Franwell and METRC Withdrawal Proposal; MJ Freeway Is Washington’s New Marijuana Traceability Software

MJ Freeway wins WSLCB seed to sale contract

Attention Licensees: The below message was sent yesterday by Deputy Director Peter Antolin to licensees who had written to the Board and staff regarding the marijuana traceability Apparent Successful Vendor and RFID tags.

WASHINGTON: The WSLCB will not require RFID as part of the marijuana traceability project. It’s Request for Proposal (RFP) was clear that the marijuana seed-to-sale traceability system must support a variety of tagging methodologies such as bar codes, RFID, etc. The RFP requirements did not allow a vendor to make any assumptions regarding use of a single tagging methodology or allow vendors to include any such costs affecting the state or our licensees in their proposal. In addition, unique plant and inventory identification numbers will be centrally created, maintained, and made available to third-party software systems via the API. Licensees will also be able to print their own labels, according to an WSLCB press release.

Traceability Advisory Group

As the WSLCB prepared the RFP, it engaged representatives of the major industry trade organizations., and held several meetings together to gather input and clearly communicate its intentions. At the most recent meeting held June 6, the LCB again asked that the representatives of the Traceability Advisory Group communicate with their members about this important point.

Change in Apparent Successful Vendor

The Apparent Successful Vendor (ASV) was not final until contract negotiations were complete and a contract was signed. Earlier today, the initial ASV, Franwell, withdrew its proposal for Washington State.  An ASV is the procurement term used for the highest scoring, responsive vendor.  The WSLCB today announced that second place bidder MJ Freeway is the new ASV.  WSLCB will soon schedule a product demonstration with our Traceability Advisory Group and begin contract negotiations quickly to get this project implemented.

Timeline

This project is on a tight timeline. The new traceability system must be in place Oct. 31, 2017.

Comments

  1. Heather says

    Washington’s narrative makes zero sense. Under what plausible scenario would Franwell withdraw only one day after Tuesday’s traceability work group meeting? The LCB’s press release last week stated that Franwell was chosen because their proposal was both “responsive” and “highest scoring”. That means that LCB has known the specifics of Franwell’s proposal the entire time, determined that it fully met the RFP rules, and then publicly announced that under the RFP rules it scored the highest. Why would Franwell walk away having won the RFP by the rules? All they’d have to say is “you accepted our proposal, we still accept our own proposal, let’s sign.” Here’s a more plausible scenario. The LCB tried to change the rules at the last moment, Franwell said “our proposal is fine, you said so yourself”, LCB said “change or we will withdraw your proposal from consideration”, and when Franwell said “we can’t budge”, the LCB took the award away. Franwell will sue the LCB for violating RFP rules and maybe even for defamation since I highly doubt there’s a written document signed by Franwell stating that they voluntarily withdrew. You heard it here first.

    • says

      Agreed, and I’ll do you one better. Something similar just happened in PA. Take a look at the Traceability Advisory Group.

      “As the WSLCB prepared the RFP, it engaged representatives of the major industry trade organizations., and held several meetings together to gather input and clearly communicate its intentions. At the most recent meeting held June 6, the LCB again asked that the representatives of the Traceability Advisory Group communicate with their members about this important point.”

      What they are describing here is most likely the National Cannabis Industry Association. This trade organization was cofounded by the CEO and President of the The Arcview Group. The Arcview Group invests in cannabis companies, and one of their investments is MJ Freeway.

      Who else is invested in MJ Freeway? The Chair of the Board of Directors of the Marijuana Policy Project. You can’t make this stuff up.

      So, the WSLCB brought their selection to the Traceability Advisory Group on June 6th. The TAG came back and said “oh no no, that won’t do. We don’t own that one” So they made up some sort of unreasonable requirement to get Franwell to withdraw.

      MJ Freeway got “hacked” 5 months ago – now they can’t stop winning contracts. Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.

      https://pammjwatch.wordpress.com/2017/05/19/pa-software-contract-goes-to-the-infinitely-cheaper-mj-freeway/

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