Medical-Marijuana Patients Don’t Always Know What They’re Getting

The vast majority of people given drug tests before Madison County District Court hearings come up positive, and that’s creating a problem for the court system.

WASHINGTON: Jessica Tonani, a Seattle biotech executive, has what she calls a “broken stomach.” Put politely, she doesn’t digest food properly, which can cause vomiting, nausea and severe weight loss.

She’s had multiple surgeries, tried all the recommended treatments for her disorder and sits twice weekly for intravenous infusions.

Tonani, 38, decided several years ago to try pot. And it has worked for her, she said, especially strains low in the psychedelic chemical THC and high in the non-psychoactive ingredient cannabidiol, known as CBD.

As a medical-marijuana patient, Tonani knows it can be hard to find the rare strains that don’t make you high — and it can be even harder to get the same kind of pot consistently.

Testing shows that some marijuana strains are not what they purport to be in name, chemical content and genetics. This is particularly concerning for patients seeking pot low in intoxicants and high in pain-relief or other therapeutic qualities.

Read full article @ Seattle Times

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