WASHINGTON: Updated List Of Pesticides Allowed For Use In Marijuana Production

WSDA and WSLCB Release Updated List of Approved Cannabis Pesticides

LCB is sharing this message on behalf of WSDA:

Bulletin No 20-02

To:         Marijuana Producers, Processors, and Retailers

From:     WSLCB and WSDA

Subject: Updated List of Pesticides Allowed for Use in Marijuana Production

The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has recently updated the list of  pesticides that are allowed for use in marijuana production in Washington State, based on  criteria previously established by WSDA.

WSDA has added six new Section 3 pesticides and four new Section 25(b) pesticides to the list of allowable products for a total of ten new products. There were no products removed from the list.  The list currently contains 307 Section 3 pesticides and 90 Section 25(b) pesticides, for a total of 397 products.

WSDA has two columns on the list: (1) Section 3 pesticides that are subject to Worker Protection Standard (WPS) requirements, and (2) Section 3 pesticides that are limited to use by non-commercial “HG Only” marijuana growers. The products designated as “HG Only=Yes” may only be used by those individuals authorized to home grow medical use marijuana.

Products marked as “HG Only=Yes” may not be used in the commercial production of marijuana.

Spray adjuvants are not included on the list—however any spray adjuvant that is labeled for use on food crops can be used with an allowed pesticide that is applied to marijuana, as long as the intended use is authorized by the spray adjuvant label. For example, a spray adjuvant labeled only for use with an herbicide cannot be used with an insecticide or fungicide. Information on spray adjuvants that are registered for distribution in Washington is available from the WSU PICOL database.

Please check your stock of pesticides against the list to ensure that you are using an allowed product. Marijuana growers can continue to use any existing stocks of pesticides that were removed from the list, but no new product can be purchased.

All of the pesticides that were added to the list contain active ingredients that were already allowed for use in marijuana production.

Some pesticides are labeled for application to soil or to crop plants, while some pesticides are labeled for application to both soil and crop plants (e.g., insecticides, fungicides). Other pesticides include herbicides labeled for direct application to, and control of, unwanted plants (i.e., weeds). Remember to read, understand, and comply with all applicable label directions and precautions when using any pesticide.

 Pesticides Added:                                                                    Registration Number

1.    Howler Lawn and Garden Organic Fungicide                  EPA No.  91197-3-92488

2.    Onward                                                                             EPA No.  90866-23-95775

3.    Promote                                                                            EPA No. 90866-23

4.    Spear LEP Biological Insecticide                                     EPA No. 88847-6

5.    Spear T Liquid Concentrate                                             EPA No. 88847-6

6.    Howler Fungicide                                                              EPA. No. 91197-3-92488

7.    Eco-1 40                                                                            WA No.  74578-19003

8.    Huma Gro Thyme Pro                                                      WA No.  999690-20001

9.    Mammoth Canncontrol                                                     WA No.  997320-20001

10.  Protection Plus Insecticide and Fungicide                       WA No.  994030-20001

You can find the complete list of pesticides that are allowed for use in marijuana production, the criteria WSDA used to establish the list, and information regarding statewide stop-sale orders in Washington on the WSDA web site: https://agr.wa.gov/departments/marijuana/pesticide-use

WSLCB Approves Jan. 1, 2020 Date For All Marijuana Products, Packaging & Labeling

WASHINGTON: On December 12, 2018, the Board adopted interim packaging and labeling policies. These policies will remain in effect until adoption of rules to implement them. It is anticipated that once adopted, all changes will be enforced January 1, 2020, giving licensees approximately one year to prepare for the new rules by selling out existing product and updating their packaging and labeling to meet new requirements.

Approved Colors, Shapes and Other Allowances

Clarifying “False and Misleading” Language

Other Resources

As Pierce County Says NO To Marijuana Businesses, Tacoma City Council Discuss How To Welcome More

MJNN EXCLUSIVE REPORT
By Aaron Ball

WASHINGTON: Just hours after Pierce County residents voted No on 1 — a measure that would have allowed legal marijuana production and sales in the unincorporated county — the Tacoma City Council convened to reconsider its cannabis policy.  The Council held a public hearing Tuesday evening to receive input about recommended amendments to its pot regulations, including modifications to Tacoma Municipal Code (TMC) Title 13 Land Use Regulatory Code and to the nuisance regulations contained in TMC Title 8 Public Safety.

In response to merging of Washington’s unregulated medical marijuana industry into I-502, and an increase in the number of Retail Licenses allotted for Tacoma by the State Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB), Tacoma Planning and Development Services manager Brian Boudet presented recommended amendments to the regulations that govern legal cannabis within city limits.  The LCB recently doubled the cap on Tacoma retail stores, from 8 to 16.  Under the current Tacoma zoning regulations, there is very little compliant space left to accommodate the increase in retail outlets.

To solve the dilemma, the planning commission recommends that the buffer for sensitive areas such as parks, libraries and arcades be reduced from 1,000ft to 500ft and transit centers be reduced to 100ft.  The 1000ft buffer from schools and playgrounds would remain.  Mr Boudet stated that it was important to maintain “equitable distribution” to ensure “that the entire community is served” while controlling against “high concentrations of retail stores.”

Staff and Planning Commission recommendations are very close on these recommendations; where they differ is the Planning Commission is recommending no buffer between retail locations while staff is recommending a 500-ft buffer downtown and 1000-ft elsewhere.

Mayor Marilyn Strickland expressed a concern for the 30 or so medical stores operating within the city limits. “The city council has always had an open minded attitude about respecting the will of the voters,” she said.  But, she bemoaned the fact that local government is still waiting “for the state to do its job and offer the guidelines” for implementing legal cannabis.   In the meantime, the council  “looked the other way,” she admits, and allowed for “many business that are open now, who wont be when these rules are put into place.”

The Mayor emphasized the importance of ensuring that “there is a place and an opportunity for those who did the right thing and played by the rules” to be able to open, while making sure that those who are operating illegally get closed down.  She concluded by saying that in the end “we are trying to normalize the market.”

There were competing views regarding limiting the number of pot shops in the city. Staff recommends that the city impose a local cap of 16 retail locations, the current cap imposed by the LCB.  The Planning Commission recommends that there be no local cap at all.  Proponents of a local cap being implemented argue that in just short of a year the LCB doubled the allotted stores for Tacoma.  If the state were to increase this allotment again staff wants the City Council to be able to revisit the new number before applications begin flooding in.  Councilman Thoms thought a cap, at least in the short term, was a good idea. “We saw in increase from 8 to 16 without having a say.”

Almost all of the public testimony was from individuals related to the cannabis industry and although some of the details varied the general message was a plea for the council to relieve some of the stifling land use regulations.  The only voice in opposition to lessening regulations was the owner of an Alzheimer assisted living home, who said that the marijuana store on the corner “changed the complexion” of the neighborhood and brought “gang activity.”

The City Council will have a study group on these proposed amendments on May 3rd and will have a first reading on May 10th.

 

  Existing Regulations Staff Recommendations Planning Commission Recommendations
Cap on Retail Stores No max cap on stores in the city Cap at 16 (Current state cap) No Local Cap
Buffers for Retail Stores
  • 1000ft for schools and play grounds
  • 1000ft for other sensitive uses (parks, arcades, libraries, etc)
  • 1000ft for schools and play grounds
  • 100ft for transit centers citywide
  • 500ft for sensitive uses within Downtown
  • 1000ft for other sensitive uses elsewhere
  • 1000ft for schools and play grounds
  • 100ft for transit centers citywide
500ft for sensitive uses citywide
Dispersion between stores Not required
  • 500ft for  Downtown
  • 1000 ft for other sensitive uses  elsewhere

 

Not required
Medical Endorsement Not currently addressed 50% of retail stores will be required to have State Medical Endorsement 100% of retail stores will be required to have State Medical Endorsement
Medical Cooperatives Not currently addressed Allow Cooperatives, with Standard State buffers:

  • 1 mile from retailers
  • 1000ft from sensitive uses
Allow Cooperatives, with reduced buffers:

  • 1 mile from retailers
  • 1000ft from Schools and playgrounds
  • 100ft from other sensitive uses

 

Green Bits Conquers Washington Cannabis Compliance Market

WASHINGTON: In episode 25 of the Investing in Cannabis Podcast, Brandon David interviews Ben Curren of Green Bits, discussing the company’s point-of-sale service designed specifically for cannabis companies. Founded on March 24, 2014, Green Bits has been growing steadily and building out its service to help canna-businesses grow and stay legal. Green Bits was also named the first runner-up at TechCrunch Disrupt, the first time in history that a cannabis technology company had been invited to participate.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5eUTNVzbx04&w=560&h=315]