Carl’s Jr. To Test CBD Infused Burger

TENNESSEE: Carl’s Jr. announced it will be testing its latest menu innovation the Rocky Mountain High: CheeseBurger Delight for one day only on April 20th at one Carl’s Jr. restaurant location in Denver.

The Rocky Mountain High: CheeseBurger Delight features two 100% charbroiled beef patties paired with Carl’s Jr. signature Santa Fe Sauce infused with hemp-based CBD oil, pickled jalapeños, pepper jack cheese and Crisscut® fries to give the burger the extra crunch – all between a premium bun.

“The new Rocky Mountain High: CheeseBurger Delight ties back to our core strategy of being the first to bring bold and unexpected flavors that are at the forefront of hot restaurant trends to a quick service menu,” said Patty Trevino, Senior Vice President, Brand Marketing at Carl’s Jr. “From our early introduction into plant-based options to bringing the rare indulgence of truffles to our menu with the new Bacon Truffle Angus Burger*, our customers have come to expect innovative and unique menu offerings, and we’re thrilled to be the first quick service restaurant to be testing CBD infused options.”

The hemp-derived CBD oil is sourced from our partner Bluebird Botanicals, a local Colorado company.

The Rocky Mountain High: CheeseBurger Delight will be available at the Carl’s Jr. restaurant located at 4050 Colorado Blvd. in Denver, CO on April 20, 2019 beginning at 6:00am MT until the store closes for $4.20, while supplies last.

* With natural and artificial truffle flavor

420MEDIA Trailblazers In Cannabis: Kim Edwards, VP Of Acacia Diversified Holdings

mjba Business

Digital marketing agency 420MEDIA and the Marijuana Business Association (MJBA) have joined forces to create a series highlighting entrepreneurs trailblazing the cannabis scene. Each week, we’ll profile a noteworthy business pioneer, and ask each 5 questions.

This week’s featured trailblazer is Kim Edwards, VP of Acacia Diversified Holdings, a vertically-integrated, publicly-traded cannabis and hemp company with a focus on cultivation, whole plant mobile CO2 processing, research and development, manufacturing, and distribution.

1. Tell us about your Company?

Acacia Diversified Holdings, Inc. through its wholly owned subsidiaries, MariJ Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (MariJ), Eufloria Medical of TN, Inc. (Eufloria), Medahub Companies, Inc. (Medahub), Canna-Cures R&D Center (CannaCures) is a vertically integrated, publicly traded cannabis/hemp company with focus on cultivation, whole plant mobile CO2 processing, research and development, manufacturing and distribution. We have completed our first year of cultivation participating in the TN hemp pilot program. We are very excited to be in TN where we will be able to cultivate and manufacture year-round within our 32,000 sq ft indoor facility. 

2. Why did you choose the cannabis/hemp business?

Love. That is what brought me to this doorstep.

When my mother received her diagnosis, I knew that I had to reach out for information and knowledge that could not only help her body fight, but eventually help many others facing a health crisis, as well. My partner, Rick Pertile and I haven’t looked back since that day. The energy I feel waking up every day being able to work with so many amazing, loving people from all sides of this business is absolutely invigorating. The powerful momentum of being part of something that is so much larger than I, is exciting.

I will be forever grateful for the amazing network of gentle people, whom I now get to call friends, that not only continue to believe in me, but believe and continue to prove time and time again, that cannabinoid therapy benefits our bodies and benefits our society. The science behind cannabinoid medicine has never been more real. So, I like to say that this industry has chosen me and many others just like me and I am simply humbled to be a little piece of the bigger picture. Together we win.


TM SOIL TO OIL (1) 3. 
What change will your firm address in the industry?

Acacia is a HIPPA compliant company (Medahub) and would like to be a part of treating cannabis/hemp with the same respect and privacies that come along with any other pharmacy prescribed medicine. 

4. Does it address an unmet need?

Yes, absolutely. As a company, we are validating and enabling doctors and patients the privacy, compliancy and consistency that they deserve. 

5. Are there any upcoming milestones for your company?

With a grateful heart, I can say yes, however honestly, I feel that we reach milestones almost every day. It is so exciting to whole plant extract and make product for some of this country’s most talented cannabis/hemp growers. Watching the love and care that surrounds this plant and knowing the time and talent that our grower families put into their farms, their cultivars and their teams make me feel like we are constantly hitting milestones together. We are looking forward to growing our Dahlia’s Botanicals charitable line as we move into 2019. I am also very excited to celebrate our upcoming 5year anniversary within this cannabis/hemp industry. I am extremely grateful for each one of my teammate’s dedication, hard work and faith in our mission to help people and to help our planet.

Where can readers learn more?

www.marijinc.com

www.acaciadiversifiedholdings.com

www.dahliasbotanicals.org

(www.eufloriamedical.com) coming soon

 

Tennessee Organizes Medical Marijuana Committee

TENNESSEE: House Speaker Beth Harwell and Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally formed a committee to study the potential impacts of legalizing medical marijuana in Tennessee.

The committee will be chaired by Sen. Steve Dickerson, R-Nashville, and Rep. Jeremy Faison, R-Cosby, who has been a staunch advocate for medical marijuana in the Volunteer State.

Speaker Harwell has recently said she is “open” to considering a law allowing medical marijuana in Tennessee and has launched a House task force to fight the state’s ongoing opioid crisis.

A 2014 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that states with medical marijuana laws are associated with a significant reduction in mortality from opioid abuse; these states saw a 25% reduction in opioid overdose deaths, compared to states without such laws.

Advocacy Groups Organize State Wide to Legalize Medical Cannabis in Tennessee

TENNESSEE: As legal reform of cannabis laws continue to progress at a fever pitch nationally and in countries such as Canada, where the newly elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau just last week ordered his Justice Minister to begin proceedings to fully legalize cannabis, reform in southern states has taken a much slower pace until now.

In an effort to educate the public and spur lawmakers into action, numerous advocacy groups, representing over 35,000 supporters, have organized to create the Tennessee Cannabis Coalition. Executive Director, Cecily Friday Shamim, said “We are here to exercise the will of the vast majority of Tennesseans who approve of providing ill patients safe access to medical cannabis.” A MTSU poll taken in 2014 showed that voters in Tennessee support access to medical cannabis by wide margins, polling at 75% in favor. “It’s time for our legislators to acknowledge the mounting evidence that cannabis does not pose any significant danger to the public and is a safe and effective medication for numerous conditions.” stated Len Armstrong, co­-founder of Tennesseans for Safe Access, a coalition member. 

Some critics argue that legalizing medical cannabis will allow the public access to another potentially addictive substance, but evidence in other medical states proves to be promising in the fight against prescription drug abuse. “States with fully implemented medical cannabis programs are seeing a 25% reduction in prescription painkiller overdose deaths.” says Shamim. As of 2014, Tennessee ranked second per capita in the U.S. for prescription drug abuse. “People are desperate for a safer alternative to these dangerous pharmaceuticals.” says Dana Arvidson, founder of the National Cannabis Patients Wall and Tennessee for Medical Marijuana. The overdose mortality rate in Tennessee is 16.9 deaths per 100,000, compared to the national rate of 12.7. Kaye Johnson, Co-Director for Tennessee Cannabis Coalition points out, “No one has ever died from using cannabis.” 

Tennessee Cannabis Coalition along with its participating organizations will a have a press conference on Tuesday, December 1st at 12:30 pm to address the upcoming legislation scheduled for review in the Senate’s Health and Welfare Summer Study, at Legislative Plaza, Room 12, at 1pm the same day.

Tennessee Farmers Seeing Mixed Results With Industrial Hemp Pilot Program

TENNESSEE:  Some farmers have seen mixed results with the state’s industrial hemp pilot program. According to the Tennessee Department of Agriculture, this is the first time in more than 70 years that farmers can grow hemp legally.

Elias Rasmussen is one of 50 farmers involved in the pilot program. He’s not your average farmer and says there were moments he thought he was going to lose everything.

“I was very emotional because it rained here several days consecutively and part of my driveway washed out even part of the field had standing water and I thought ‘oh no, this is the end,’” said Rasmussen.

He planted about 50 pounds of hemp seeds and has been pretty successful. He’s in the middle of harvesting thousands of seeds from his hemp plants.

Elias Rasmussen
Elias Rasmussen

Other farmers didn’t have as much luck. Another hemp farmer from Athens said he planted about the same amount of hemp seeds and only ended up with about an ounce worth.

Families Praise Passage Of Cannabis Oil Bill

TENNESSEE:  For the first time, medical marijuana will be available in Tennessee after a bill allowing cannabis oil as an alternative medicine for seizure patients passed the Tennessee House and Senate with unanimous yes votes Monday night.

For families of seizure patients who have been relentlessly advocating the legislature since the bill was introduced, the passage of the bills was a cause for celebration.

“It was a feeling of great joy from all the families and we gathered in the hall with hugs and tears of joy,” said Ellen McCall, a Greeneville mother who advocated for the bill to help her seizure stricken daughter, Penelope. “We had an idea that we would have at least the minimum amount of votes we would need for it to pass, but we weren’t expecting to get that many.”

The bill redefined marijuana by removing the requirement that cannabis oil containing cannabidiol and less than nine-tenths of 1 percent of tetrahydrocannabinol be transferred, dispensed, possessed or administered as part of a clinical research study to be in legal possession.

 

If CBD Oil Becomes Law Monday, It Could Have Far Reaching Effects

TENNESSEE:  Legalizing cannabis oil for use as an alternative medicine is coming up for a full vote in the Tennessee legislature on Monday after sailing through every committee.

If the bill passes, it would have far reaching effects throughout the state. It would affect law enforcement, health care workers and, maybe most importantly, seizure patients. An amendment was added to the bill during the House Health Committee which added access to people suffering from epilepsy, opening up the number of patients who could potentially have access to the oil.

The bill, introduced by Rep. Jeremy Faison, R-Cosby, would redefine marijuana by removing the requirement that cannabis oil containing cannabidiol and less than nine-tenths of 1 percent of tetrahydrocannabinol be transferred, dispensed, possessed or administered as part of a clinical research study to be in legal possession.

 

Advocates Sobered By Medical Marijuana Bill Language

TENNESSEE:  They didn’t have to pass it to find out what’s in it, but some advocates of medical marijuana were wondering if passing the Republican version was worth the wait after the legislation made it to the floor of the Tennessee House of Representatives on Tuesday.

In some ways, the bill – HB1284 in the House and SB1248 in the Senate – breaks new ground for conservative lawmakers in the state in terms of what medical conditions warranted medical marijuana (MMJ) treatment, what parts of the marijuana plant were considered usable and in the types of acceptable drug delivery methods, like vaporization.

But MMJ advocates like Bernie Ellis, a respected epidemiologist and Tennessee farmer, hoped to see something that would benefit both patients and growers in the state. Instead, he quickly identified several stipulations that amount to a “poison pill” that would severely restrict access, or make access punitive, while allowing only the wealthy to take part in the benefits of growing, manufacture and sales.

GOP Medical Marijuana Bill Has Oils, Legal Growing

TENNESSEE:  Marijuana legally grown, processed and given for treatment at the recommendation of a doctor in Tennessee could become a reality if lawmakers approve a new Republican-led initiative.

The chances of changing current law aren’t fantastic: Sen. Steve Dickerson, R-Nashville, put the odds of the General Assembly approving his limited medical marijuana plan this year at “50-50, plus or minus 5 percent.” The anesthesiologist argues the science behind the need for medical cannabis oil is more concrete.

“The data is improving every day. I’ve read 50, 60 papers and abstracts, and it looks like 60 percent plus of those have some sort of beneficial effect,” Dickerson said.

Nashville GOP Senator To Propose Medical Marijuana Bill

TENNESSEE:  A Nashville Republican senator is working on legislation that will, to some degree, suggest changing Tennessee law to allow marijuana for medicinal usage.

Sen. Steve Dickerson, who is also an anesthesiologist, confirmed Thursday he’s working on the legislation with Rep. Ryan Williams, R-Cookeville.

“We want to make sure that it’s medical appropriate, substantiated, and that it answers the real needs of Tennesseans,” Dickerson said.

Dickerson said the details won’t be finalized until Monday, but the goal is to provide some relief to people suffering from conditions that might be alleviated through the use of medical marijuana. He said he thinks the bill will be “limited,” but at the same time he hopes to make it “as inclusive as possible.”