Cannabis Leads to an Improved Sex Life, Says New Eaze Study

CALIFORNIA: Yes, cannabis does lead to better sex. That’s according to a new data report, Let’s Toke About Sex, released today by cannabis marketplace Eaze, just in time for Sexual Health Month in September. The report takes a comprehensive look at the effects cannabis can have on sex lives across multiple demographics and relationship statuses. The report reveals that across age demographics, whether single or divorced, a regular cannabis consumer or not, solo or with a partner, people report that cannabis improves sexual experiences. Eaze partnered with Lioness, the smart vibrator company — which enables users to track their climaxes via its app and advanced sensors — to study the effects of CBD and THC in the bedroom.

“Simply put, cannabis makes sex lives better,” said Peter Gigante, Head of Research at Eaze. “As an increasing number of Americans are turning to cannabis to enhance their lives, it only makes sense that it would extend into the bedroom.”

Key findings from the report include:

  • Bring me a higher love: 85% of respondents reported being more satisfied with the quality of their orgasms during solo sessions and 79% during partner sessions.
  • I’m picking up good vibrations: Overall, 84% of surveyed consumers reported cannabis helped them find sex toys more pleasurable during their solo sessions and 79% during partner sessions.
  • Don’t stop me now, cuz I’m having a good time: Cannabis had a resounding effect on increasing the length of sexual activity for both solo sessions and partner sessions. 64% of respondents said the length of their solo sessions increased and 73% said the length of their partner sessions increased.
  • When it comes to satisfying sex, cannabis > alcohol: When compared to alcohol, cannabis is associated with more intense orgasms (66% vs 2%), longer sex sessions (57% vs 6%), feeling connected to a partner (56% vs 3%), more satisfying foreplay (55% vs 3%), and a higher number of orgasms (52% vs 2%).

“The fact of the matter is, cannabis is helping people have healthier and happier sex lives,” said Liz Klinger, co-founder and CEO at Lioness. “We hope that this report will help break down outdated taboos around pleasure and are thrilled to partner with Eaze to uncover new insights about the positive effects cannabis can have on sexual exploration.”

Eaze is committed to educating both new and existing customers about the benefits of cannabis and the innovative products available to them. In addition to this study, Eaze publishes its Eaze Insights State of Cannabis Report to provide a comprehensive overview of consumer trends driving the cannabis industry year over year.

Other insights from the report include the number of married people using cannabis compared to single people, which THC form factors are proven to be most effective during sexual activity, and which provide the ability to climax more quickly. The full report can be found here.

 

 

Study: Oral THC Safe And Effective At Treating Symptoms Of Anorexia

ISRAEL:  The daily administration of low doses of oral THC is associated with treating various symptoms associated with anorexia nervosa, according to clinical trial data published in The Israeli Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences.

Investigators with Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the Eating Disorders Institution at the University of Haifa assessed the daily use of up to 2mgs of oral THC in patients suffering from chronic anorexia. Participants in the open-label trial ingested THC for a period of three weeks.

Researchers reported significant improvements in participants’ self-reported body care, depression, and asceticism (avoidance of all forms of indulgence). Authors further reported that all but two of the nine patient participants gained weight over the course of the trial.

“The present study is the first to show improvement in the psychological symptoms of patient with AN (anorexia nervosa) when treated with delta-9-THC, without side effects,” authors concluded. “These encouraging results on a group of chronic AN patients suggest that low doses of delta-9-THC should be further studied as an adjunct to the treatment of patients with AN.”


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “The impact of delta-9-THC on the psychological symptoms of anorexia nervosa: A pilot study,” appears in The Israeli Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences.

Research Shows Medical Cannabis To Become a Major Part Of Pharmaceutical Market

NEW YORK: According to a research report by New Frontier Data, medical marijuana sales are forecast to grow to $5.3 billion in 2017, accounting for 67% of total cannabis sales. Medical sales in currently legal states are forecast to grow to $13.2 billion by 2025, at which point medical sales will account for 55% of all sales. In comparison, adult-use sales in 2017 are forecast to reach $2.6 billion, rising to $10.9 billion by 2025. Medical cannabis products are known to be beneficial for such conditions as chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sleep disorders, anxiety, nerve pain and others.

The research points out that the United States constitutes 35% of the global pharmaceutical market, the largest market in the world, and a major driver of the U.S. economy, and it is estimated that cannabis and related products can replace $4.4 billion to $4.9 billion per year of current spending on existing treatments.

“Looking at these numbers, it would appear that medical cannabis would be a drop in the bucket when it comes to impacting the total pharmaceutical industry. However, when you start to break down the numbers by specific sectors of the industry, like chronic pain or symptoms associated with chemotherapy, which are very lucrative markets for pharmaceutical companies, you will certainly see cannabis have a major impact,” said Aguirre De Carcer, CEO of New Frontier Data.

 

Clinical Trial: THCV Lowers Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 Diabetics

UNITED KINGDOM: The administration of THCV (tetrahydrocannabivarin), a non-psychoactive component of cannabis, is positively associated with glycemic control in type 2 diabetics, according to the randomized, placebo-controlled data published in the journal Diabetes Care.

Investigators from the University of Nottingham, School of Medicine assessed the twice daily administration of various cannabinoids (CBD or THCV or CBD and THCV in combination) versus placebo over a period of 13 weeks in 62 non-insulin dependent subjects with type 2 diabetes.

Authors reported that the administration of THCV alone “significantly decreased fasting plasma glucose” levels and improved pancreatic cell function. By contrast, other treatment therapies failed to show detectable metabolic effects.

Investigators concluded, “THCV could represent a new therapeutic agent in glycemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes.”

Population-based observational studies have previously reported that cannabis consumers typically possess lower BMI and other favorable indices related to diabetic control compared to those without a history of marijuana use.