Case Report: Daily CBD Administration Associated With Remission Of Schizophrenic Symptoms

GERMANY: The adjunctive use of cannabidiol is associated with a remission in schizophrenic symptoms in a patient previously unresponsive to conventional treatment, according to a case report published in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry.

Investigators from the University of Leipzig in Germany assessed the use of twice-daily dosing of 750mg of CBD in conjunction with clozapine in a patient with treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Cannabidiol dosing was associated with remission criteria and improvements remained consistent over eight months.

“Our case report contradicts the assumption that CBD is not likely to be any superior than existing antipsychotics,” authors concluded. “In fact, CBD might be particularly suitable for those patients [who are] resistant to antipsychotics due to its different mode of action.”


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Remission of severe, treatment-resistant schizophrenia following adjunctive cannabidiol,” appears in the Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry.

Study: CBD Effective As Adjunctive Therapy For Schizophrenia

UNITED KINGDOM: The daily administration of CBD (cannabidiol) as an adjunctive therapy mitigates psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia, according to clinical trial data published online ahead of print in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

British researchers assessed the adjunctive use of CBD compared to placebo over a six-week period in a randomized trial of 88 schizophrenic patients. Participants ingested 1000mg of plant-derived CBD per day in addition to their conventional medications.

Subjects in the CBD treatment group “had lower levels of positive psychotic symptoms and were more likely to have been rated as improved and as not severely unwell by the treating clinician” at the conclusion of the trial. CBD administration was also associated with “improvements in cognitive performance and in the level of overall functioning,” although these changes did not reach statistical significance.

“These findings suggest that CBD has beneficial effects in patients with schizophrenia,” authors concluded. “As CBD’s effects do not appear to depend on dopamine receptor antagonism, this agent may represent a new class of treatment for the disorder.”

Results of a prior clinical trial published in the journal Translational Psychiatry determined that CBD is superior to amisulpride, a potent anti-psychotic agent, in mitigating psychotic symptoms in schizophrenic patients.


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Cannabidiol (CBD) as an adjunctive therapy in schizophrenia: A multicenter randomized controlled trial,” appears in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

Marijuana-Schizophrenia Connection Just More “Reefer Madness”

MASSACHUSETTS:  Researchers from Northwestern University reported Monday that chronic teenage use of marijuana contributes to changes in a person’s brain structure to resemble that of a person with schizophrenia, often resulting in memory issues.

Release of the research comes about a week after Uruguay became the first nation to legalize marijuana use for Uruguayans 18 and older, and after months of increased support from the general American public to end the prohibition of marijuana, prompting some to wonder if the release of this research is a last ploy to keep marijuana illegal? [Read more…]

Forget Marijuana Madness: Could Marijuana Treat Your Depression

NETHERLANDS: Depending on who you listen to, marijuana could be the solution for whatever ails you or your ultimate demise; or it could make you dumb and sick. We have a tendency to believe the research not funded by biased parties in support of federal marijuana prohibition—the research that shows cannabis may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s and obesity, kill cancer cells, and even treat depression. [Read more…]

A Link Between Marijuana, Schizophrenia Is Tenuous

NEW YORK: Samuel T. Wilkinson’s attempt to tie marijuana to mental illness (“Pot-Smoking and the Schizophrenia Connection,” WSJ op-ed, July 2) is reefer madness all over again.

The evidence indicating a causal relationship between marijuana consumption and mental disorders is “neither very new, nor by normal criteria, very compelling,” according to research published in the journal Addiction in 2010.

[Read more…]

You Don’t Have to Think Marijuana is Safe to Support Legalization

Project SAM’s Kevin Sabet and other prohibition advocates have seized on a new Wall Street Journal op-ed rehashing claims that marijuana use may be correlated with schizophrenia:Why isn’t this getting more play? Doc at Yale School of Medicine: Pot-Smoking & the Schizophrenia Connection  via @WSJ — Kevin Sabet (@KevinSabet) July 2, 2013

Washington Post blogger Jennifer Rubin, in a piece titled, “A Really Good Reason Not to Legalize Pot,” claims that “the move toward legalization of marijuana is premised on the assumption that it is ‘safe.’”

The argument that marijuana should be legalized because it is safe or safer than other substances like alcohol is an argument that some reformers often make, but it’s not an argument you’ll ever see me making, and it’s certainly not the only reason people in our movement want to end prohibition.

In my view, getting sucked into a debate over whether marijuana is good or bad is an unhelpful distraction from the core issues we need people to understand about prohibition.