Cannabis Activist Partners with Washington Traffic Safety Commission for Impaired Driving Awareness Campaign

WASHINGTON: Vivian McPeak, the executive director of Seattle Hempfest, has joined voices with Darrin Grondel, the director of the Washington State Traffic Safety Commission, to get a holiday season message out about the dangers of impaired driving. The pair participated in the production of a video promoting safe driving through awareness about the dangers of driving impaired on cannabis, alcohol, or other substances.

Vivian and DarrinPSA Video

“Seattle Hempfest takes a variety of measures in the interest of public safety, so this is just another aspect of that approach. We welcome the opportunity to get a message on impaired driving out farther than we could just by ourselves,” says McPeak. 

A recent survey showed that nine percent of Washingtonians report driving after cannabis and alcohol use. These people were also most likely to believe, mistakenly, that using cannabis after drinking helps sober them up. This combined effort puts a focus on advanced planning and alternative transportation.

“One of my personal pet peeves is folks driving after mixing alcohol and cannabis, which is a recipe for driving impaired,” says McPeak. “Driving under the influence of alcohol or cannabis increases your chance of getting a DUI as well as having a car crash. The smartest approach is to use an alternative mode of transportation,” he adds.

“Safety is no accident, it takes planning and forethought. If people plan before they party everybody wins,” McPeak continued.

Free Lyft Tickets

We are looking forward to distributing free $20 vouchers for Lyft rides on Tuesday Dec 11 at Uncle Ike’s Smoke Shop at 2310 E Union St in Seattle, and Wednesday, Dec 12 at Piece of Mind at 2808 E 30th Ave in Spokane.  “We hope everyone will come down to these stores and get a free Lyft voucher to help them plan before they party this season, “ says McPeak. “A little common sense goes a long way.”

 

Forum in Bend To Focus On Safety In Cannabis Industry

OREGON: Cannabis growers and extractors are invited to an unprecedented opportunity to learn from government and business leaders about safety and health in the cannabis industry as part of a two-day event in Bend next month.

Oregon’s Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA), a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, is one of several partners presenting the Sept. 18-19 cannabis forum – “Safety and Health in the Cannabis Industry: From Seed to Shatter” – at the Riverhouse on the Deschutes.

The cannabis forum is part of the larger Central Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Conference, which will tackle a range of other workplace health and safety issues.

The forum arrives as the industry surrounding cannabis – a legal agricultural commodity in Oregon – continues to evolve. It will address multiple health and safety topics, and afford participants a question-and-answer session. It will feature speakers from Oregon OSHA; the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC); Oregon Department of Agriculture; the Portland and Bend fire departments; and Oregon-based grow and extraction operations.

Screenshot 2018-08-16 07.55.10Topics include:

  • OLCC requirements
  • Cannabis grow operations
  • Hydrocarbon extraction
  • Carbon dioxide extraction
  • CO2 and alcohol extraction
  • Fire marshal regulations
  • Pesticide regulations
  • Ergonomic risk factors
  • Oregon OSHA consultation services

Registration for the Central Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Conference, which includes the cannabis forum, is now open. The cost to attend ranges from $55 to $210. For more details about the cannabis forum – including specific presentation times and topic areas – or to register, go to https://safetyseries.cvent.com/central18.

Farmer Tom Calls For A Safer Cannabis Workplace

WASHINGTON: Tom Lauerman, universally known as “Farmer Tom,” is a well-known and beloved figure in Washington’s cannabis community.  Attend any cannabis event in the Evergreen State – from farmer’s market to the steps of the Statehouse in Olympia – and you are likely to see Farmer Tom – long flowing Santa beard and floppy hippie hat – front and center representing the cause.

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The Feds Visit A Cannabis Farm

These days, when he’s not working with his business partners on an upcoming line of “organic” soils and nutrients, Farmer Tom can be heard espousing the benefits of establishing best practices and standards for the cannabis  industry – advocating for everything from safer pest management and testing practices to the rights of his fellow workers in weed.

ft today we farm logo

Farmer Tom is a pioneer in working with the Federal Government to create workplace safety standards for the cannabis industry. Last fall, he and his wife Paul invited the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to visit his medical marijuana farm in Vancouver, WA.  The feds spent several days on the farm reviewing for the first time the working conditions on a real cannabis farm.  The visit garnered quite a bit of attention for the media-friendly Farmer Tom, including a feature in this month’s DOPE Magazine.

ft snake oil

I Don’t Make Snake Oil

Workplace safety “runs in the family” for Farmer Tom. “My Grandfather was head of HR at both Republic Steel and Covair and was on the first national safety commission,” Lauerman told MJ News Network.  “I handled OSHA paperwork and meetings while in the corporate world and worked with the Union drafting a workplace health and safety manual.”

As part of his mission to raise awareness of safety issues among leaders of the legal cannabis industry, Farmer Tom will be a featured presenter at a “Cannabis Industry Safety Night” panel discussion on May 26th, an event sponsored by the MJBA Portland, and CannaGuard Security.   Joining Tom will be environmental, health & safety expert Sally Koch, Indy Safety; Paul Equall, Life Safety Corp; and Mike Sotelo, CEO of Consolidar Networks.

Federal agents studied cannabis workplace safety at Farmer Tom's

Tools of the Trade

Farmer Tom has plans to publish a cannabis workplace health and safety manual soon. “I’m working with a few groups developing workplace health and safety standards,” he explained, “and have been approached by Washington state university on doing continued research in the Cannabis world.”

Stay tuned here.

 

 

 

Colorado Marijuana Shop Owners Racing To Bag Safety

COLORADO:  Child-resistant packaging is a pillar of Colorado’s rules for recreational pot shops, approved as a requirement months ago to reduce the risk of accidental ingestion by young children.

But several business owners say they are struggling to find vendors that manufacture the proper bags or can supply enough to meet demand in time for the opening of the first stores Jan. 1.

All retail pot products leaving shops — from buds to brownies — must be placed in opaque and child-resistant packaging.

“A number of our members are having an incredibly difficult time,” said Mike Elliott, director of the Medical Marijuana Industry Group, the state’s largest marijuana business group. “We’re all looking for ways to comply with this rule, and everyone is worried we’re not going to be able to, basically.” [Read more…]

Colorado Marijuana Shop Owners Racing To Bag Safety

COLORADO:  Child-resistant packaging is a pillar of Colorado’s rules for recreational pot shops, approved as a requirement months ago to reduce the risk of accidental ingestion by young children.

But several business owners say they are struggling to find vendors that manufacture the proper bags or can supply enough to meet demand in time for the opening of the first stores Jan. 1.

All retail pot products leaving shops — from buds to brownies — must be placed in opaque and child-resistant packaging.

“A number of our members are having an incredibly difficult time,” said Mike Elliott, director of the Medical Marijuana Industry Group, the state’s largest marijuana business group. “We’re all looking for ways to comply with this rule, and everyone is worried we’re not going to be able to, basically.” [Read more…]