Colorado: Retail Marijuana Sales Not Associated With Increased Youth Access Or Use

COLORADO:  The establishment of retail cannabis sales for adults is not associated with either increased marijuana access or use by young people, according to data published online in the journal Prevention Science.

A team of investigators with the University of Colorado, School of Public Health assessed marijuana use trends among a representative sample of Colorado high-school students for the years just prior to the implementation of retail sales and again 18-months later.

Authors reported: “There was an absence of significant effects for change in lifetime or past 30-day marijuana use. Among those reporting past 30-day use, frequent use and use on school property declined. There was a significant decline in the perceived harm associated with marijuana use, but we did not find a significant effect for perceived wrongfulness, perceived ease of access, or perceived parental disapproval.”

They concluded, “We did not find a significant effect associated with the introduction of legal sales of recreational marijuana to adults in Colorado on adolescent (illegal) use.”

The data is consistent with prior studies finding that neither the enactment of medical cannabis legalization nor the enactment of adult use regulation is independently associated with increased marijuana use by young people. Separate survey data released by the Department of Public Health and Environment last month reported that rates of marijuana use by Colorado teens have remained virtually unchanged following legalization, and are consistent with the national average.


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Adolescent marijuana use, marijuana-related perceptions, and use of other substances before and after initiation of retail marijuana sales in Colorado (2013-2015),” appears in Prevention Science.

Fort Collins Schools Won’t Get Marijuana Money

COLORADO:  When Colorado residents legalized the retail sale of marijuana in 2013, some supported the measure because a portion of tax revenue was destined to boost school funding.

However, Poudre School District will not receive a dime of that money. Fort Collins-area parents who see critical needs in the district’s 50 schools, including a lack of air conditioning in some schools, are angry.

The constitutional amendment to legalize retail pot sales promised the first $40 million collected from a 15 percent excise tax on unprocessed retail marijuana would be used to help Colorado’s 178 public school districts.

The tax goes into the public school capital construction assistance fund and is transferred to the state’s Building Excellent Schools Today, or BEST, competitive grant program. Funding awarded through the program established in 2008 can be used for construction of new schools, renovation of existing public school facilities or addressing critical public health and safety issues.

 

Fort Collins’ Retail Marijuana Sales To Begin This Week

COLORADO:  As of Friday, anyone looking to get their hands on recreational pot and marijuana-infused edibles won’t even have to venture outside downtown Fort Collins.

Organic Alternatives, 346 E. Mountain Ave., will open its doors to retail sales Friday at 10 a.m., making it the first Fort Collins dispensary to venture into the growing market. The day will mark the culmination of years of campaigning for pro-pot regulation and public education efforts by the business’s owner, Steve Ackerman.

“We expect it to be popular. We’re not just inside the city limits of Fort Collins, but we’re in Old Town. We’re very central,” Ackerman said Tuesday.

The City of Fort Collins on Sept. 17, 2013 adopted a temporary ban on retail marijuana establishments within the city. While hundreds of retails shops have sprouted across Colorado since New Year’s Day – and only a few within Northern Colorado, primarily Garden City near Greeley – Fort Collins staffers took additional time to fine-tune a regulatory framework and conduct more public outreach.

Here's How Many Pot Shops Will Open In Denver After Weed Is Legal

COLORADO:  As few as five to ten Denver-area pot shops may be allowed to start selling recreational weed when Colorado’s landmark law goes into effect on January 1, despite more than 100 businesses waiting for approval from the city.

Dispensary owners say they’re facing delays that could prevent a vast majority of shops from being able to sell retail marijuana to adults 21-and-over come the new year.

“It has been very frustrating from a multitude of angles working with Denver City and County, the various departments within the government,” Toni Fox, owner of 3D Cannabis Center in Denver, told The Huffington Post. “Right now what’s happening is there are a few of us that have had all of our T’s crossed and I’s dotted since day one and we’re ready, but there’s just this delay.” [Read more…]

Love It Or Hate It, Consensus Is Colorado Prop AA Pot Tax Will Pass

COLORADO: It’s not just about forcing marijuana customers to pay more, it’s also about setting precedent for legalization around the country, say advocates opposed to the steep consumption tax voters are being asked to approve next month. [Read more…]

Public Health Goes After Seattle Hookah Bars – Bad News For Marijuana Clubs?

WASHINGTON: In 2005, Washington voters approved an initiative banning smoking in bars, restaurants … any indoor public place. And, while some have tried to get around the law by calling themselves private clubs, public health officials are taking action to shut those businesses down. [Read more…]

Canon City Appears To Be Leaning Toward Marijuana Retail As Big Decisions Loom

COLORADO: Retail marijuana will be the talk of the town Tuesday when the Board of Fremont County Commissioners hosts a special meeting and public hearing at 9 a.m. and the Cañon City Council discusses it during its 6 p.m. meeting. [Read more…]

Retail marijuana labels in Colorado will have to include potency, expiration dates, safety warning

DENVER: Colorado has announced detailed rules for how recreational pot should be grown and sold starting next year.

The state department that will regulate marijuana released more than 60 pages of rules Monday for how marijuana sales will be licensed and regulated. The Colorado Legislature set broad parameters earlier this year, but the nitty-gritty rules were left to the Department of Revenue.

[Read more…]

Colorado Springs Council Gets Earful on Pros, Cons of Retail Marijuana Sales

COLORADO: Colorado Springs City Council hosted a town hall meeting to talk about pot and about 60 people signed up to speak. But first the council heard from 19 community leaders, who spoke for more than two hours on the pros and cons of opening marijuana stores in the city. [Read more…]

Colorado Springs Council Gets Earful on Pros, Cons of Retail Marijuana Sales

COLORADO: Colorado Springs City Council hosted a town hall meeting to talk about pot and about 60 people signed up to speak. But first the council heard from 19 community leaders, who spoke for more than two hours on the pros and cons of opening marijuana stores in the city. [Read more…]