There Are More Marijuana Legalization Initiatives Than GOP Presidential Candidates

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Not counting initiatives for industrial hemp or non-plant medical marijuana or low-THC cannabidiol oil, there are at least* 20 efforts going on in 8 states nationwide to legalize medical and recreational access to cannabis in 2016. As of this week, there are 16 Republican candidates running for president in 2016.

Arizona

Arizonans for Mindful Regulation (AZFMR) will legalize possession of an ounce of flowers and an ounce of concentrates, home cultivation of twelve mature plants per adult plus possession of the harvests, but landlords could prohibit cultivation on their properties. Localities could not ban home growing. Most marijuana crimes below a half-pound or 100 plants are reduced to misdemeanors. Marijuana metabolites in their urine can no longer be used to fire employees or convict DUIs. Marijuana will be taxed at 10 percent.

Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol  (RegulateAZ) will legalize possession of an ounce of flowers and 5 grams of concentrates, home cultivation of six mature plants per adult and a max of 12 per household plus possession of the harvests, but landlords could prohibit cultivation on their properties and localities can ban home growing altogether. Marijuana will be taxed at 15 percent. The proposal is backed by the Marijuana Policy Project.

House Rejects Bill To Legalize Marijuana

MAINE:  The Maine House of Representatives has rejected a bill that seeks to legalize marijuana for recreational use in the state. The Democratic-controlled House voted, 98-45, against the bill on Monday. It will now be considered by the Republican-controlled Senate but is not expected to pass there either.

The bill would allow people ages 21 and older to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and would set up a system to regulate and tax the drug. It would have to be approved by voters in a statewide election.

Two groups have already launched referendum drives to try to get marijuana legalization proposals on the ballot next year.

GOP Hopefuls Criticize Obama Marijuana Policy But Hedge On Their Own

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Republican presidential hopefuls are united in blasting President Obama for his chaotic enforcement of marijuana laws, but the unity quickly breaks down when they are asked how they would handle things if they were in the White House.

Some have sent mixed signals, saying state decisions should be respected while questioning how Mr. Obama has respected those decisions. Others have refused to say how they would wield the federal bureaucracy against marijuana.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is one of the few potential candidates to take a firm stance, saying he would insist on following federal statutes that outlaw the drug.

“I don’t think you can ignore federal law,” Mr. Jindal told radio talk show host Hugh Hewitt, who asked whether the governor would “bring the hammer” down on pot stores in states with legalization laws. “Federal law is still the law of the land. It still needs to be enforced.”

GOP Congressman: Republicans Should Embrace Marijuana Legalization

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  The federal courthouse in right-leaning Orange County, Calif., is named after former president and Republican Party icon Ronald Reagan. Countless drug cases prosecuted in that building can be traced back to an expanded war on drugs under the 40th president, who once called marijuana “probably the most dangerous drug.”

The Republican congressman who represents the land of Reagan, however, wants marijuana legalized. After winning reelection in a landslide last week despite that well-publicized position, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher returned to Capitol Hill on Thursday with a message for his party.

“To my fellow Republicans,” said Rohrabacher, a former Reagan press secretary and speech writer, “Wake up! . . . The American people are shifting on this issue.”

Flanked by lawmakers from Colorado, Oregon and the District of Columbia, where voters have chosen to legalize marijuana, Rohrabacher on Thursday made his most forceful case yet for Republicans to stand down on the issue.

 

Legalization Advocate Says Marijuana ‘Literally Saved My Life’

MINNESOTA:  Legalizing marijuana for medical purposes has nothing to do with a liberal agenda, says Kevin “KK” Forss.

“I’m a born-again Christian. I’m a veteran. I’m a Republican,” said the Cloquet man. “It isn’t liberal; it’s about people who are suffering.”

Forss, now 47, never imagined himself as an advocate for legalized marijuana.

The events that changed all that began on May 19, 2004.

Forss, a freelance photographer then living in Virginia, had driven to the Twin Cities to meet with his first book’s publisher.

He stayed in his publisher’s house overnight, and when he woke up “it felt like someone had torn my clavicle completely out of my body,” Forss recounted.

Legalization Advocate Says Marijuana ‘Literally Saved My Life’

MINNESOTA:  Legalizing marijuana for medical purposes has nothing to do with a liberal agenda, says Kevin “KK” Forss.

“I’m a born-again Christian. I’m a veteran. I’m a Republican,” said the Cloquet man. “It isn’t liberal; it’s about people who are suffering.”

Forss, now 47, never imagined himself as an advocate for legalized marijuana.

The events that changed all that began on May 19, 2004.

Forss, a freelance photographer then living in Virginia, had driven to the Twin Cities to meet with his first book’s publisher.

He stayed in his publisher’s house overnight, and when he woke up “it felt like someone had torn my clavicle completely out of my body,” Forss recounted.