Cannabis Sales Projected To Increase as California Paves the way for Recreational use

CALIFORNIA: The global legal cannabis market was valued at $14.3 billion in 2016 and is forecast to grow at a CAGR of 21.1% between 2017 to 2024 or culminating to $63.5 billion by 2024, according to a report by Ameri Research.

The market is going through a period of strong growth thanks to increasing legalization and decriminalization of cannabis products across North America and Europe. The report indicates that due to the complex regulatory structure at state and federal level, the full potential of the market is not yet clear. A recent report published by Arcview Market Research explains that growth of the legal cannabis industry will reaccelerate beginning 2018, as adult use sales ramp up in CanadaCalifornia, and Massachusetts along with medical sales in Florida.

In states like California for example, where new recreational cannabis laws went into effect on January 1st, 2018, analysts are projecting an increase in sales of Cannabis. The new industry is also expected to contribute to California’s tax revenue. The LA times reported that, California is on the verge of creating a legal market for marijuana worth more than $5 billion that will help make the state a destination for pot-loving tourists.

Colorado To Cannabis Retailers: How We Doing?

COLORADO:  The State of Colorado wants to be a better partner it’s legally-licensed pot shops, and in an effort to better understand their needs has tapped the expertise of Clear Voice Research to conduct a first-ever research study.  Designed to help inform how the Colorado Department of Health and Environment can be a better partner to the state’s marijuana retailers, and make improvements to its Good to Know campaign, the state is scheduling 75-minute focus groups for April 10 and 11 across Colorado, and is seeking industry participants.  If you qualify for and complete the focus group you will be rewarded $60 cash.

Good To Know

The purpose of the study is to better understand customer experiences in predominantly recreational marijuana dispensaries across the state. For that reason, this survey be completed by staff members who work in the “front of house” and is responsible for handling customer interactions and transactions.

Think that’s you? Click HERE to continue. 

Not you, but you think your staff would be interested? Please forward this email along to them.

Your time and participation are greatly appreciated! If you have any questions or problems with the survey, please contact Kate directly at kate.flaherty@clearvoiceresearch.com or at 303-895-3596.

The fine print: This survey is being conducted by ClearVoice Research, Inc. an independent research firm based in Denver, Colorado. ClearVoice Research respects your privacy and any answers or information you share with us will remain completely confidential. This email contact is for research purposes only. Nothing you share with us will ever be used for sales or marketing purposes.

Berkley Is Next Michigan City Expected To Vote On Easing Marijuana Penalties

MICHIGAN: Volunteers who’ve walked the streets of Berkley for the last month said Monday they plan to turn in about 700 signatures today aimed at putting yet another marijuana-legalization question before yet another city’s voters.

By the time the door-to-door campaigns end, similar questions likely will appear on ballots in nearly 20 communities around the state, from Utica to the U.P., said leaders of Safer Michigan, a Detroit-based nonprofit group coordinating the far-flung petition drives.

Campaigners said they’re hard at work in Berkley’s neighbors, Huntington Woods and Pleasant Ridge. They expect that the three towns’ November ballots will ask residents: Should the city allow “the use, possession or transfer” of up to 1 ounce of marijuana on private property that is “not used by the public” by those 21 and older.

Legal Marijuana, Drug-Free Workplaces On Collision Course

COLORADO:  Marijuana legalization is on a collision course with employers wanting drug-free workplaces, say two attorneys on the front lines of the new legal battlefield.

Legalization of pot also is the enemy of employers seeking to maintain high quality, low absenteeism and steady healthcare costs, says an addiction counselor.

Increased marijuana use is producing more Americans unfit for work and unable to lead productive lives as the head of healthy families, says counselor Richard Taite. In 2003, Taite, who is a recovered addict, founded Cliffside Malibu, an upscale addiction rehabilitation center located on the shores of the Pacific Ocean.

In the face of increased marijuana use, both Taite and Colorado attorney Danielle Urban agree business leaders have the right to protect themselves and hold their ground on drug-free workplaces. Urban works for Fisher & Phillips Attorneys at Law in Denver and has been involved in workplace issues across the country.

Pope Francis Condemns Legalization Of Marijuana

VATICAN CITY:  Pope Francis has come out strongly against the legalization of recreational drugs, lending his voice to the debate which is raging from the U.S. to Uruguay and beyond.

Francis told members of a drug-enforcement conference meeting in Rome on Friday that even limited attempts to legalize recreational drugs “are not only highly questionable from a legislative standpoint, but they fail to produce the desired effects.”

Francis has frequently railed against the “evil” of drug addiction and has met with addicts on several occasions.

Study of Pot Smokers’ Brains Shows That MRIs Cause Bad Science Reporting

This week a study of cannabis consumers published by The Journal of Neuroscience provided powerful evidence that MRI scans cause shoddy science reporting. Researchers at Northwestern University and Massachusetts General Hospital used MRIs to compare the brains of 20 young adults who reported smoking pot at least once a week and 20 controls who had used marijuana no more than five times in their lives and had not consumed it at all in the previous year. The pot smokers had higher gray-matter densities in the left nucleus accumbens, and there were “significant shape differences” between subjects and controls in that area and in the right amygdala. The differences were more pronounced in subjects who reported smoking marijuana more frequently. “Because this is a cross-sectional study,” the authors noted, “causation cannot be determined.” In other words, it is not clear whether the brain differences were caused by marijuana. It also is not clear how long the differences last or whether they have any functional significance.

Those nuances generally were lost in press coverage of the study, which presented the MRI scans as evidence that smoking pot causes brain damage. News outlets claimed the study found that “marijuana re-shapes brains of users” (NBC News), that “even casually smoking marijuana can change your brain” (The Washington Post), that “casual pot use impacts brains of young adults” (The Oregonian), that “recreational pot use” is “harmful to young people’s brains” (Time), that “casual marijuana use” is “bad for young adults” (The Times of India), and that “even ‘casual’ marijuana use can knacker bits of your brain” (Gizmodo UK). Medical News Today headline quoted the researchers as saying “casual marijuana use changes the brain,” although that statement does not appear in the article under the headline, in the study itself, or in press releases about the study issued byNorthwestern UniversityMassachusetts General, and the Society for Neuroscience, which publishes The Journal of Neuroscience. Similarly, an MSN NZ headline had the study claiming that “cannabis use ‘alters brain regions,'” another phrase that is absent from the study and the press releases.

Arizona Poll Shows Growing Support For Legalized Pot

ARIZONA:  Arizona voters may be ready to follow the lead of Colorado and Washington residents and make marijuana use by anyone legal.

A new statewide poll shows 51 percent of those asked said the drug, now authorized for those with a medical need, should be made available to all, compared with 41 percent opposed.

Jim Haynes, president of the Behavior Research Center, said the numbers are little short of a sea change in public opinion.

He said that while this is his first statewide poll on the question, a 1974 national survey found legalization opposed by a margin of close to 3-1. Now nationwide numbers pretty much track what was found here, with 54 percent in support.

Some of this may be an increasing acceptance of what was once considered by many to be a dangerous drug.

No, Marijuana Dispensaries Are Not Selling Out Of Weed In Colorado

COLORADO:  An overwhelmingly high demand for recreational marijuana in Colorado sparked rumors last week that pot shops were starting to sell out of weed — a problem that could prompt some people to return to the black market.

However, now that the dust has settled since the dash to buy pot during its first days of commercial legalization in the state, those rumors appear to be the result of an opening-week rush.

“We do have a smaller crowd today compared to last week, and we’re not selling out,” Pete Vasquez, general manager at the Denver dispensary Medicine Man, told The Huffington Post over the phone. “From customers I’ve heard that no one else is selling out either, it’s just something going around on the news.”

Other dispensaries validated Vasquez’s assessment.

“We are not sold out and have tons of inventory,” Ryan Garbey, a bartender at Denver Kush Club, told HuffPost.

 

No, Marijuana Dispensaries Are Not Selling Out Of Weed In Colorado

COLORADO:  An overwhelmingly high demand for recreational marijuana in Colorado sparked rumors last week that pot shops were starting to sell out of weed — a problem that could prompt some people to return to the black market.

However, now that the dust has settled since the dash to buy pot during its first days of commercial legalization in the state, those rumors appear to be the result of an opening-week rush.

“We do have a smaller crowd today compared to last week, and we’re not selling out,” Pete Vasquez, general manager at the Denver dispensary Medicine Man, told The Huffington Post over the phone. “From customers I’ve heard that no one else is selling out either, it’s just something going around on the news.”

Other dispensaries validated Vasquez’s assessment.

“We are not sold out and have tons of inventory,” Ryan Garbey, a bartender at Denver Kush Club, told HuffPost.

 

The do's and don'ts of Colorado's new recreational marijuana rules

DENVER – A sampling of rules for retail sales of recreational marijuana in Colorado. The rules were released Monday, but retail sales don’t start until January.

• No single package of an edible marijuana product can contain more than 100 milligrams of active THC, no matter how many servings it contains.

• Colorado residents can buy up to an ounce of marijuana at a time. Out-of-state residents can buy up to a quarter-ounce.

• Labels on marijuana-laced snacks have to list their ingredients and carry warnings including “The intoxicating effects of this product may be delayed by two or more hours.”

• Licensed growers can’t sell to consumers. Marijuana can’t be consumed at a cultivation site.