Medical Product Sales On The Rise At Recreational Cannabis Shops

By Sue Vorenberg
Cannabis Daily Record

WASHINGTON: Recreational cannabis shops in Southwest Washington are seeing an increasing demand for products with medical properties, such as high CBD edibles and cannabis-infused topicals for pain.

Store managers and owners at the Cannabis Country Store in Battle Ground and The Herbery in Vancouver, Washington, report so much demand for CBD-based products that at times they say it’s hard to keep up.

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“CBDs are on the rise – we really can’t carry enough of it,” said Jim Mullen, chief operating officer at The Herbery, which has two stores in Vancouver. “We have so many people coming in looking for it.”

CBD, or cannabidiol, is a non-psychoactive component of cannabis used in medical marijuana markets for pain relief, as an anti-inflammatory and for reducing seizures. Requests for high CBD products – or products with a balance of CBD and THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis – at recreational stores often come from customers looking for relief of nausea, pain and a variety of other issues.

Initially there weren’t many high-CBD products in Washington’s recreational market because owners and growers anticipated the greatest demand would be for high-THC cannabis. But as more Baby Boomers and older Americans return to marijuana in legal markets, the demand is changing.

Washington State House Passes Recreational Marijuana Reform Bill

WASHINGTON:  The House on Friday passed a measure that makes several changes to the state’s new recreational marijuana market, including eliminating the three-tier tax structure and replacing it with a single excise tax of 37 percent at the point of sale.

House Bill 2136 passed the House on a 59-38 vote and now heads to the Senate for consideration. An amendment that passed Friday removed language from the original bill that would have only allowed local bans on licensed marijuana businesses if approved by the jurisdiction’s voters. 

To encourage more cities and counties to allow marijuana businesses, the bill directs the state to share pot revenue with jurisdictions that do so. It would also allow them to adopt more flexible zoning for where pot grows and stores can be located.

Washington Retail Landscape Update 2/12/2015

by Dominic Corva, Executive Director CASP

WASHINGTON: It’s been a while since we’ve looked at the progression of I 502 Retail Cannabis landscape, pictured above in the map by Steve Hyde.  The conjunctural interest is driven by our need to understand how fast I 502 retail stores are currently being approved, now that the availability of supply is no longer a barrier to entry. We expected more retailers to open up once this happened, and in the trendline below we see that around January 1, 2015, the pace of new approvals began to exceed the overall trend since July 6.

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There are lots of other factors that influence retail decisions to go into business, of course. The availability of affordable retail space for lottery winners, and subsequent lottery replacements for the 25 retail applicants who for one reason or another failed to cash in on their lottery number, is the most significant variable. This of course is also influenced by jurisdictional bans and moratoria that represent a ceiling on how many of the 334 retail slots can possibly open, even given approval.

It’s also important to note that many “approved” applicants are not yet open, because it takes a little while to open retail doors once approved. As of February 3, 2015, 117 retail stores have been approved. Dozens of that number are not yet open, and we anticipate that their arrival in the market will help clear the harvest bounty. It is too early to say how much.

But one thing we can say with some confidence, is that the flip side to the Producer/Processor glut problem is that prices are down and quite possibly, I 502 recreational stores may be picking up consumers for whom I 502 product is a reasonable substitute for medical access point product, if price of flower is the main obstacle to switching over. Of course, there’s a lot more to it than that, but the closer retail prices for comparable product for comparable consumers (ie, not patients), the easier it will be for I 502 producers to clear inventory.