Cannabis Industry Needs More Budtenders

The Cannabis industry is thriving right now, as more and more states legalize the natural drug for medical consumption and recreational use. The industry is worth an astonishing $50 billion dollars and one of the most in demand positions is what’s known as the budtender.

Budtender’s are the front of house staff, the first people you will see when you visit a Cannabis dispensary when you obtain your Medical Cannabis Prescription. These positions are in huge demand, generally, they have a huge wealth of knowledge and must know about a variety of strains, what they are used for and what they do. Not only this, they are also offer up advice, recommendations and product safety.

This means, anywhere that Cannabis is legal, there are firms headhunting super-savvy sales people with the ability to sell the heck out of as much Cannabis as humanly possible. The salesforce is not for the faint hearted, let’s face it, the Cannabis industry did not grow to be 50 Billion dollars by being passive when it comes to sales.

Dispensaries need very knowledgeable people to push as many grams, oils and edibles into the bags of hundreds of consumers that pass through their doors each day. Those who can do this and focus in on the customer care at the same time are the most successful in the business.

Dispensaries look for people who are very enthusiastic about Cannabis. The best Budtender’s can make in excess of $35-40K in their first year. Most dispensaries start their staff out at $12-14 dollars an hour. It’s a very good sustainable income if you can get it! Let’s face it, Medical Cannabis is a green niche, no pun intended.

So how do you get the job?

To become a budtender, there are some requirements. You can forget thinking that it involves growing dreadlocks, having blazed red stoner eyes and tie-dye clothing. The industry is trying to project an image that goes against the grain of the stereotype. Adding “I have watched get high 50 times” to your CV will not work, so forget that.

Budtender Requirements

  1. Gift of the gab – Budtenders are not just enthusiastic about the products, they also possess a certain finesse when it comes to selling. It is a fine art that is not learnt but something every good salesman possesses. They can answer any question about any product within a split second and turn that answer into a sale.
  2. Knowledge – A good Budtender will always be able to answer any questions on any product immediately. They have extensive knowledge on a wide variety of product. Though dispensaries supply on-the-job training, having knowledge about the different strains will be a bonus.
  3. Customer Service Skills – Customer service is always a must in Business, especially the retail sector. Successful sales people can talk to a customer in such a way that they feel very comfortable and confident that the product they are selling them is what they need.
  4. Highly Organized – Every second is a hustle in any Business on the sales floor. Showing your employer, a great level of determination early-on is the sure-fire way to success in the Business. The Business of sales is a cut-throat world, nobody will carry you through it, it’s a path you learn on your own and put your unique twist on.

 Photo: Jake Dimmock, the original budtender at Seattle’s Diego Pellicer.

Recently Pardoned? Lowell Herb Co. Is Hiring

CALIFORNIA: Lowell Herb Co., the fast growing cannabis company behind the number one pre-roll in California, is expanding and hiring. Through its trailblazing Social Equity and Reparative Justice Program, special consideration will be given to recently pardoned, non-violent cannabis offenders and will offer a wide spectrum of resources to individuals hoping to enter the cannabis space at various levels. CEO David Elias describes the ideal candidate as a motivated team member who will contribute to the day-to-day operations of the company in a dynamic way, adding that “We value hard work and dedication and we’re putting a strong emphasis on employing people negatively impacted by cannabis incarceration and those whose lives have been affected by cannabis convictions on their records.”

To get the word out to a wider audience, Lowell unveiled a billboard near the Men’s Central Jail and Twin Tower Correctional Facility (the sign is located on Daly St. north of Mission Road facing the 5 South Fwy.) announcing the jobs initiative and will be actively promoting the project on TV, radio, and online venues.

herbco employees

Lowell has career opportunities across various fields and levels of expertise such as package design, sales, marketing, distribution, shipping and customer service. Most of the jobs will be in Los Angeles, but there are also openings in the Bay Area, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and San Diego.

In addition, Lowell and its coalition of brand and retail partners, will offer internship roles in each division of its operations. This structured approach to on-the-job training industry education and specialized career focus, will help propel interns to the next level when they enter the workforce.

Beginning later this year, Lowell will host a series of meet-up style workshops which will be open to the public and will offer panel discussions and intensive training sessions as a crash course introduction to participants hoping to obtain roles in the industry. “It’s our priority to establish programs such as these to give motivated, bright individuals a second chance, and allow them to participate in this thriving industry” said Elias.

Report: Legal Cannabis Industry Responsible For 150,000 Full Time Jobs

WASHINGTON: The legal cannabis industry is responsible for the creation of an estimated 150,000 full-time jobs, according to state-by-state datacompiled by the online content provider Leafly.com.

Their analysis identified 149,304 full-time jobs supported by the legal marijuana industry. Not all of the jobs included in the tally involved direct contact with the plant, as ancillary businesses like consultants and hydroponics providers were also included.

The total represents a 22 percent increase in the number of full-time cannabis-related jobs created within the past 12 months.

States reporting the largest number of cannabis-related jobs were California (47,711) Colorado (26,891), and Washington (26,556).

Marijuana Industry Entrepreneurs Enjoy Hottest Career Opportunities

By John Levy

The marijuana market is among the fastest growing of all time. It is also becoming more socially acceptable, and as such, many young people are opting for a career in the cannabis industry. According to Forbes, the pot sector will create more employment than manufacturing by 2020. There are many job opportunities in the cannabis industry and thousands are taking advantage of them.

Job listings are available abundantly online. People are flocking to cannabis job fairs in droves. Companies employ many attendees at a time, but more people are just trying to get into the space. Most have little to no experience working with marijuana, but they believe wholeheartedly in the product and because these jobs are typically unique, there is place for anyone willing to learn.

The cannabis industry is not only attractive to the youth. Older folk are also involving themselves, particularly those too old for the traditional workforce, yet with bachelor’s degrees. Store managers are not especially unique, but marijuana industry entrepreneurs can choose from other job positions found nowhere else.

These are currently the top five job opportunities in the cannabis industry:

  1. Store Manager
  2. Grow Master
  3. Bud Trimmer
  4. Extraction Technician
  5. Owner

1. Store Manager

Managers play a crucial role in any retail environment, including recreational outlets and medical dispensaries. Store managers earn a very good salary in the cannabis industry. At the very least, they can make upwards of $75,000 per year, and they can expect a bonus based on gross sales.

Commission can be particularly lucrative when you consider how some Californian dispensaries turn over up to $10 million annually, which adds up to a very healthy bonus. As with traditional jobs, these employees also get health insurance and vacation pay. There is also room for job growth, as many managers become supervisors overseeing several stores.

2. Grow Master

You need a unique skillset to become a cannabis grow master. This person has the responsibility of cultivating the different marijuana strains. Much like a master chef, it is a seller’s market for grow masters. There is a very high demand for people with growing skills, and because of this, they can command their own salaries. Some earn a basic wage of $100,000 per year and a profit percentage.

Currently, the best cultivators originate from states with the longest legalization period, such as California and Colorado. They are already used to earning exceptional wages and working by themselves, and they have had the time to perfect their skills and solidify their reputations. The future will likely have celebrity cultivators, much like the celebrity chefs we have today.

3. Bud Trimmer

Bud trimming is an entry-level position, but it will get you into the cannabis industry. These employees earn the lowest wages. In California, bud trimmers typically make approximately $13 per hour, but there is always work available for them. Some earn according to the pound, which adds up to between $100 and $200 for every pound of bud they trim.

In medical marijuana dispensaries, bud trimmers are valuable. They remove flowers from stems and it is paramount that they waste as little as possible, cut only what is necessary, and ensure buds are in pristine condition. They also separate and weigh leaves, stems, and buds. Although it is certainly a tedious job, bud trimming is one of the easiest ways to work your way into the cannabis industry.

4. Extraction Technician

When people think of marijuana, they picture the flowers. However, cannabis extracts are becoming increasingly popular, accounting for as much as 40 percent of sales at some outlets. Considered “extract artists,” these employees typically have PhDs and unique skills. Salaries are as high as $125,000 in profitable dispensaries.

Some states only allow patients to use medical marijuana extracts. According to the New York State Department of Health, patients in New York may not smoke pot. They may only use it as an extract. Although expensive machines have the actual job of extracting, technicians have the expertise and knowledge to make them work, as well as the experience to provide consistent quality to patients.

5. Owner

Owning a marijuana business is not as fun a job as it sounds. It comes with one headache after another. People think owners make millions, but this is untrue in most cases. There are banking and legal worries, as well as a constantly shifting regulatory environment. Marijuana business owners cannot claim the same deductions other businesses can, making expenses extremely high.

For many cannabis business owners, it takes years for revenues to pay off initial capital investments. They fork out millions of dollars and only see profits years later. Even so, the marijuana industry is in its earliest phase, and with forecasters predicting decades of explosive growth, owning a cannabis business can be both lucrative and far more pleasant than the daily grind of traditional jobs.

Final Thoughts

If you are considering a career in the cannabis industry, then there are plenty of job opportunities already available. If you take the time to hone specialized skills, then you can command the best salary in a market desperately looking for you. Consider taking a cultivation or extraction course if you are serious about joining the ranks of marijuana industry entrepreneurs.


John Levy blogs for Pot Valet, a leading company to provide cannabis delivery service in Los Angeles.

 

The Legal Cannabis Market Contributes to Job Creation

NEW YORK: New data shows that the growing legal cannabis industry is strongly contributing to job creation. A recent report by New Frontier Data, which provides comprehensive analysis and reporting for the cannabis industry, projects that by 2020, the legal cannabis market will create more than a quarter million jobs for American workers.

The legal cannabis market was worth an estimated $7.2 billion in 2016, and is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 17%. The medical cannabis market is projected to grow at 13% CAGR through 2025, growing from $4.7 billion in 2016 to an estimated $13.3 billion in 2020.

“These numbers confirm that cannabis is a major economic driver and job creation engine for the U.S. economy,” said Giadha Aguirre De Carcer, Founder and CEO of New Frontier Data. “While we see a potential drop in total number of U.S. jobs created in 2017, as reported by Kiplinger, as well as an overall expected drop in GDP growth, the cannabis industry continues to be a positive contributing factor to growth at a time of potential decline. We expect the cannabis industry’s growth to be slowed down to some degree in the next 3 to 5 years, however with a projected total market sales to exceed $24 billion by 2025, and the possibility of almost 300,000 jobs by 2020, it remains a positive economic force in the U.S.”

Highest Reward Rolls Out 2016 Cannabis HR Benchmark Survey

COLORADO:  Highest Reward, a Denver-based canna-tech startup providing affordable online solutions that automate the human resource process, is surveying cannabis establishing HR benchmarks for the Cannabis industry.   For the second year running, the company is asking participants in the legal marijuana industry to detail how the fastest growing industry in the country is managing HR.

Ashley Afable, Highest Reward Cofounder, VP Biz Development, tells MJ News Network the survey will provide valuable data and insights to employers on topics including:

  • Attracting and retaining Cannabis talent
  • Compensation planning and making pay decisions
  • People strategy, processes, and structure
  • HR technology
  • HR staff size and budgeting

benchmarket survey“All of the data will be aggregated, and anyone who participates gets the report for free,” Afable said.  The survey is available online until July 15th, and takes 20 minutes or less to complete.   Take the survey now

How Healthcare Professionals Are Getting Involved In The Legal Cannabis Industry

Medical professionals and their approaches to the growing MMJ industry

By Zack M

As the medical marijuana industry continues to grow, so too does the opportunity for innovation. Healthcare professionals in particular are taking part in this boom and have been approaching the legal cannabis industry in a multitude of ways.

Education and Training

Although medical marijuana is legal in certain states, there remains a dearth of licensed healthcare professionals catering to patients wishing to seek treatment via medical cannabis. A study of physicians’ attitudes towards marijuana as conducted by Konrad and Reid concluded that whilst only 19% of respondents believed physicians should recommend medical cannabis to patients, a whopping 92% agreed that education about medical marijuana should be made available to them. As such, several organizations exist that are helping educate medical professionals about how to incorporate MMJ in their practice.

The New York State Medical Marijuana Program for instance offers practitioner education, practitioner registration, patient certification, and the identification of registered practitioners. These facilities allow doctors to recommend medical marijuana to their patients and understand the laws surrounding it with ease. 602 physicians have registered as of June 21, 2016 and many similar organizations and resources for doctors can be found online and nationwide.

Ivy league doctor, Dr. David Casarett has too recognized the lack of medical cannabis education available to not merely physicians, but patients, dispensary owners, and growers. In his book, Stoned: A Doctor’s Case for Medical Marijuana, Casarett makes compelling arguments for medical marijuana’s risks and benefits. He hopes that his book will serve as a guide and that it can address the fact that many of his “physician colleagues are realizing that [medical marijuana] is something they should know about,” adding that “they may decide that they won’t recommend [medical marijuana], but they have to know about it.”

Less conventional than that of doctors’ is the introduction of nurses to the field of medical marijuana.Unlike physicians, nurses do not legally require certification to assist patients wishing to obtain prescriptions for medical marijuana.  Just as there is a lack of physicians working with MMJ patients, even more pronounced is the absence of nurses in this respect.

Patients normally receive most of their advice from doctors and dispensary staff regarding the appropriate cannabinoids, dosage, and delivery methods. Organizations like the American Cannabis Nurses Association (ACNA) have emerged in order to fill this gap. With a mission to “advance excellence in cannabis nursing practice through advocacy, collaboration, research, education, and policy development,” the ACNA stands as a forum and platform for education. Understanding “how and why patients are choosing this treatment” and “how this use effects other medical treatments” can help nurses better connect with their MMJ patients and ensure patients get proper therapy.

Unconventional Approaches

A new service in California called Meadow—which began as a medical marijuana delivery service—ventures outside the box in the name of convenience. It permits doctors to make house calls for medical cannabis related concerns. Services such as these help bridge the gap between potential patients and doctors and make it easier for people to receive accessible treatment.

Dermatologists too are taking advantage of the legal cannabis industry by creating topical skincare products with marijuana as the active ingredient. Some skincare experts claim that when applied topically, marijuana could make skin look younger as well as treat certain skin conditions such as dry and itchy skin.

With all these new developments in an industry only in its infancy, we can be sure to expect a future of healthcare professionals entering the field in a wider range and larger volume of ways.

Guest Post: Cannabis Working Conditions Vary, Need Better Controls

By Edmonde Franco

Guest Editorial

WASHINGTON: I remember sitting on my living room floor smoking a joint with friends while watching Saturday Night Live. Laraine Newman was doing an ad for the American Dope Growers Union. We laughed so hard tears were running down our cheeks.

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It was April 1977. Looking back on it now maybe it isn’t so funny after all. Maybe it is an idea whose time has come.

One evening I was talking with friends about the possibilities of investing in the new cannabis industry. We wondered if it would be a good bet for the future, since the clone to customer chain seemed to be where the real money was to be made.

So I took a job at a Washington State producer/processor. No better way to see and learn an
industry than from the bottom up.

I lasted less than a month. Not because the job was hard but because I was asked to work in a closed room with an non-ventilated propane heater. Carbon monoxide poisoning is not on my list of ways I want to die.

When my concerns were brushed aside I quit. I wasn’t there because I needed a job. I could easily walk away.

Sadly that is not the case for the many people still out there working in conditions just like that.  “Just go outside if you start to feel dizzy” is not the proper way to handle the situation.

Recent articles on pesticides found on retail samples of cannabis raise a larger question for me.   Do you think the worker who was told to spray that pesticide was wearing anything more than a paper mask? Was he wearing even that?

I began to wonder if what I was seeing was typical of the industry so I talked to other workers from producer/processors around the state. I was not surprised to find conditions ran the full gamut from serious laboratory conditions to down right sweat shops.  Most seem to fall somewhere in between.

I did hear a fair number of people who complained about problems with getting paid. Some had to wait past scheduled paydays for their checks and a number complained of checks bouncing but eventually getting paid.

I did notice a large number of people were hired as contract agricultural workers, not as employees.   This leaves the worker open to paying their own taxes and payments. It also gives them none of the protections given to employees.

Five Things To Know Before Joining The Cannabis Industry

By Sue Vorenberg
Cannabis Daily Record

WASHINGTON: Legal cannabis may be the fastest growing industry in the country right now, but how do you know if it’s the right fit for you?

Working in the industry comes down to a lot more than just a love of pot. Whether you’re looking for a career as a bud trimmer, budtender, grower or anything else, it’s important to keep in mind that the rules in this young industry aren’t well established – and joining it isn’t for the faint of heart.

Still think you’re ready to go? Here are five things to consider before jumping in:

1. Every business is a startup business.

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Why does it matter if a business is old or new? It comes down to money and structure.

Established industries offer jobs with benefits, stability and often a well-thought-out chain of command.

Don’t expect that in the cannabis industry.

The oldest marijuana businesses – at least legal recreational ones – have only been around for about a year and a half. Most don’t offer health or retirement benefits, and with markets in legal states still in flux, there’s no assurance that your job will still be there in six months.

Management and human resources aspects of these businesses may also not be as well thought out as you’d find in other industries. If you want to work for a good company, do some research first, ask questions about how employees are treated, and don’t just jump at the first offer that comes along.

 

This Newspaper Is Looking for a Marijuana Critic

OREGON: The employment outlook is looking up for cannabis aficionados.

The Oregonian, the main newspaper in Portland, is looking for a critic to review marijuana strains and other weed-related products. The job listing for the freelance position demands an “experienced cannabis consumer” with deep knowledge of the strains of marijuana available in the state.

The role will also include writing about the state’s “robust cannabis culture and marketplace.”