OLCC Announces Spring 2017 Recreational Marijuana Workshops

OREGON: The Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC), along with the Oregon Department of Agriculture, the Oregon Department of Revenue, and Franwell Metrc – the provider of Oregon’s Cannabis Tracking System (CTS), will hold Recreational Marijuana Program licensee workshops around the state in May, 2017.

The workshops will be held in Eugene at Lane Community College on May 3, in Ashland at Southern Oregon University on May 4, in Newport at the Best Western Agate Beach on May 11, and in Bend at the Riverhouse on the Deschutes on May 18th.  At this time the Oregon Department of Revenue will present only at the Newport and Eugene workshops. Registration is now open. The workshops will include program updates and information on:

  • Update on Rules & Licensee information
  • Pesticides
  • Packaging and Labeling
  • Cannabis Tracking System – Bring Your Own Device/Data (BYOD) – Metrc will answer your questions
  • Taxes: Collecting & Reporting

There will be two tracks offered, one for producers and processors, and another for wholesalers and retailers.  The content will be tailored to the license categories.

Producers/Processors  

9:30 a.m             Check-in

10 a.m.               Pesticides

10:45 a.m.          Break

11 a.m                Packaging & Labeling

12 p.m.               Lunch Break – Networking

1 p.m.                 Rules & Compliance

1:45 p.m.            Metrc

2:45 p.m.            Break

3:00 p.m.            Taxes

3:15 p.m.            General Q&A session

Wholesalers/Retailers

9:30 a.m             Check-in

10 a.m.               Rules & Compliance

10:45 a.m.          Break

11 a.m                Metrc

12 p.m.               Lunch Break – Networking

1 p.m.                 Pesticides

1:45 p.m.            Packaging & Labeling

2:45 p.m.            Break

3:00 p.m.            Taxes

3:15 p.m.            General Q&A session

The workshop is open to all licensees or their representatives; one licensee per track.  Non-licensees can register but will be waitlisted until licensees have had the opportunity to register.

Note:  Anyone who registers for the workshop, is a “no-show” and doesn’t cancel their reservation will be placed on a “no-show” list.  Anyone on the “no-show” list will be restricted from registering for future OLCC workshops until other licensees have registered. Interested parties can register here for the workshops.

Oregon Cannabis And Pesticides

OREGON: For the purpose of pesticide regulation, the Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) considers cannabis grown in Oregon to be an agricultural crop.

​​Updates on pesticide products and cannabis

​More information on cannabis and working with ODA​. As additional resources become available, they will be posted here.

Guide list for pesticides and cannabis

Always read the label!

Always read the label!

The guide list for pesticides and cannabis was updated Oct. 17, 2016, and is sorted by active ingredient then product name. The intent of the list is to assist growers in distinguishing those pesticide products whose labels do not legally prohibit use on cannabis from those that clearly do not allow use. The list is not an endorsement or recommendation to use these products in the production of cannabis in Oregon. Do not hesitate to contact Pesticides staff with questions or for label clarification.​ ​​

​​​​Resources

Cannabis and pesticides: Letter to producers (2016)

Pesticide information for cannabis producers

Cannabis email subscription

Sign up to receive email when new information is available from ODA on cannabis.Subscribe

Guidelist for Pesticides and Cannabis

The guidelist was updated Oct. 17, 2016, and is sorted by active ingredient then product name. The intent of the list is to assist growers in distinguishing those pesticide products whose labels do not legally prohibit use on cannabis from those that clearly do not allow use. The list is not an endorsement or recommendation to use these products in the production of cannabis in Oregon. Do not hesitate to contact Pesticides staff with questions or for label clarification.Guidelist

Internal management directive (criteria)

Guidance to ODA staff on how to determine whether a pesticide may be used on cannabis and included on guidelist.Document

Licensing Requirements for Pesticide Applications to Cannabis

Document

Marijuana Production: Chemigation and Fertigation Practices

Information from the Washington State Department of Agriculture about applying pesticides and fertilizers through an irrigation system when growing marijuana either indoors, outdoors, or in a greenhouse. Details about practices

Oregon Flags Potential Problem With Popular Pesticide Used On Marijuana

OREGON: The Oregon Department of Agriculture on Friday temporarily removed a popular pesticide from its list of chemicals cannabis growers may use on their crop.

Rodger Voelker, a chemist with OG Analytical, a marijuana testing lab in Eugene, said he recently noticed that abamectin, a common insecticide, had turned up in a handful of cannabis samples submitted by growers who said they grew organically. One mentioned he used only Guardian Mite Spray. Voelker asked for a sample of the mite spray, tested it and detected abamectin, an active ingredient not listed on the product label.

Voelker alerted agriculture officials about his results on Thursday since the mite spray is included on the state’s newly released list of pesticides growers may be able to use on their plants. The product is marketed as an all natural pesticide containing products like cinnamon oil and lemon grass oil.

Oregon Lawmakers Hear About Pesticides, Edible Serving Sizes And Marijuana Tracking

OREGON: The Oregon Department of Agriculture has identified 250 pesticides that marijuana producers may use to combat pests, mold and other problems common in the industry.

The pesticides on Oregon’s list pose minimal risk to human health, according to the federal government, which sets pesticide policy nationally. Most pesticides approved for use in organic agriculture, for instance, would be allowed. Pesticides must list broad agricultural uses on their labels to be included on the state’s list.

The agency’s assistant director, Lauren Henderson, briefed Oregon lawmakers Monday about the state’s new policy on pesticide use in cannabis. The issue is a major one for the industry, which has relied on pesticides to deal with mites and other problems that can render a crop worthless.

 

Official: Oregon Hemp Industry Not What Was Envisioned

OREGON:  A state agriculture official said Tuesday that Oregon’s hemp industry is not turning out the way lawmakers envisioned, so the department will recommend changes to the law regulating how it is grown.

The law authorizing industrial hemp production in Oregon was written to regulate it as an agricultural crop, with large fields of densely planted hemp grown for fiber, seed and oil, said Lindsay Eng, who oversees the hemp program for the Oregon Department of Agriculture.

Instead, the nine operations inspected by the department this year seem more interested in producing compounds known as CBDs, which don’t get people high, but are believed to have medical benefits. They are also found in marijuana.

 

Marijuana Growers Warned Not To Use Illegal Pesticides – Which Is Nearly All Of Them

OREGON: The Oregon Department of Agriculture is warning marijuana growers to stop using illegal pesticides, while the state scrambles to put together a list of acceptable chemicals.

The federal government puts pesticides through tests that determine in what context a chemical may be used in agriculture and how much may be used. Those accepted uses are then listed on the label of the pesticide.

However, because cannabis is an illegal substance according to federal laws, there are no approved pesticides to use in marijuana cultivation. So, while many growers use pesticides, the application is technically against the law.

 

State’s First Industrial Hemp License Goes To A Southern Oregon Man

OREGON:  A man who was issued the first state permit to grow industrial hemp said he and a nonprofit group of growers and activists hope to plant a 25-acre field in Southwest Oregon this spring.

Edgar Winters, of Eagle Point, Ore., who describes himself as director of the Oregon Agriculture Food & Rural Consortium, acknowledged there are problems obtaining seeds for planting and other complications, but said he is optimistic. Winters also said warehousing and processing facilities will be ready to go when a crop is harvested in late summer.

“We are in position to do 40 tons a day at our processing mill,” Winters said. “We’ve got our ducks in a row.”

Getting seed to plant is one of the major hurdles. Importing it requires the approval of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Oregon Department of Agriculture and Oregon State University are working with the DEA on that process. In addition, Winters said a major Canadian hemp company, Hemp Textiles International, has breeders’ rights to its seed and will not allow Oregon growers to retain seed for planting. Meanwhile, the existing state statute requires hemp seed produced in Oregon to be replanted.

 

Industrial Hemp In Oregon: State Officials Drafting Rules For Hemp Production

OREGON: Oregon agriculture officials on Tuesday said they hope to have rules in place for the possibility of producing industrial hemp by the spring planting season. 

The Oregon Department of Agriculture has assembled a committee of policy officials and agriculture experts, including Russ Karow, head of the Oregon State University crop and soil science program, to draft rules for industrial hemp production. [Read more…]