How To Make and Cook With THC Coconut Oil

Making and cooking with THC coconut oil is not as difficult as it may sound. It is a nifty way to consume cannabis. You can bake cannabis coconut oil into different types of edibles or take it alone. Most cannabis strains complement the flavor of coconut oil. You can use Sativa, Indica, or other higher CBD strains of cannabis to get your desired effect. However, you will often need a canna-butter while cooking with cannabis.

If you have certain dietary restrictions or follow a vegan lifestyle, butter may not be an option for you. Fortunately, when it comes to binding to different types of plant or animal-based fats, cannabis does not discriminate. CBD and THC molecules tether easily to fat molecules since they are fat-soluble and lipophilic. In other words, they dissolve in fats quite easily. When you bind cannabis in this manner, you will enhance its benefits more than when you use alcohol or water bases.

Making THC coconut oil is very easy. It is also a great way to use up hash, kief, or trim from harvest. It is not necessary to overcomplicate the process or simmer it for a long time. The method outlined below will give you fancy, tasty, and potent cannabis coconut oil.

What You Will Need

To begin with, you will need a large measuring cup or bowl, cheesecloth, bowl to store the THC coconut oil, and sieve. You will also need two cups of unrefined coconut oil and 40 grams of decarboxylated cannabis. You can learn how to decarboxylate cannabis by doing a simple Google search.

Dosing, Strains, and Expectations

1.5 grams of trim per one tablespoon of cannabis coconut oil is quite a strong dose. It is ideal for people who suffer from frequent migraines, which require a stronger dose. You can use anywhere from 0.5 to 1.5 grams of hash, bud, or trim per tablespoon of coconut oil. If this is your first time making and cooking with THC coconut oil, 16 grams of cannabis to two cups of coconut oil should serve you well.

If you prefer to use buds instead of trim, using a bit less is okay. This is because there will be more trichomes, which translates to more THC. Therefore, if you choose to use buds in the batch above, you should probably use 0.5 grams of buds for each tablespoon of coconut oil.

If you choose to take cannabis orally, it can take quite a while to feel it. However, the effects will probably linger for much longer. Cannabis coconut oil, on the other hand, it very potent and will likely make you sleepy. Therefore, if you have obligations later, do not take a new dose. Alternatively, you can use only Sativas in your coconut oil to combat sleepiness.

Combine the Cannabis and Coconut Oil and Simmer

Combine the coconut oil and cannabis in a saucepan and simmer over the lowest heat possible. Once the oil melts, let the mixture simmer for an hour while stirring every so often. If it turns out not green at all or too green, it is okay. The color does not have anything to do with the strength of cannabis coconut oil.

You need to use your cheesecloth in a sieve to strain the mixture over your measuring cup. Pour the hot mixture into the cheesecloth and let it drip for about an hour. Afterward, squeeze the rest out by hand. Finally, pour the THC coconut oil into a bowl or glass jar and leave it uncovered to cool. Once it is cool, close the container and store it in a cool dark place or the refrigerator.

Cooking With THC Coconut Oil

If this is your first time using THC coconut oil, try taking a tiny amount by mouth to test its potency. Before taking any more, however, you will need to wait at least three to four hours. This will help you get a baseline for how to use it on food and whether you need to increase or decrease the dose.

If you choose to cook with THC coconut oil, you should use recipes you are familiar with. Knowing how many slices of cake, muffins, or cookies that your recipe produces will help you figure out how much of the cannabis coconut oil you need to use per serving. If you need your edibles to be less potent, you can use half butter and half THC oil.

MJBA Founder To Talk Media And PR At King Cannabis Expo

WASHINGTON: Before he founded the influential Marijuana Business Association in 2012, MJBA Founder David Rheins was a successful media and marketing executive, with an impressive track record of brand building at some of the world’s most successful media companies, including Rolling Stone, Spin, and AOL Time Warner.

Rheins is fond of drawing the parallels with his publishing work and his new mission of helping to build the legal cannabis industry.  “The emerging legal cannabis industry is exciting and noisy, chaotic and hyper-competitive,” Rheins told MJNN.  “Tens of thousands of new cannabis brands are vying for consumer attention, shelf-space and market share.  Licensees must navigate complicated and expensive regulations, and are limited in how they market and advertise their legal wares.  Similar to the challenges that faces independent rock & rollers or garage tech startups, today’s legal marijuana entrepreneurs must learn how to effectively stand out from the cacophonous competitive clutter — it’s differentiate or die.”
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On Saturday the MJBA founder and executive director will be a featured speaker at the King Cannabis Expo in Spokane, WA, where he’ll speak to an audience of licensed cannabis producers, processors, retailers and brand builders on the topic of  “Managing Your Media and PR.”

Five years ago when I started the MJBA, my mainstream media colleagues thought I was crazy, that I had literally ‘gone to pot.’  Now, those same executives are reaching out looking for unique stories to tell.  That presents a huge opportunity for cannabis companies and thought-leaders,” Rheins said. 

 

 

Study: Cannabis Use By Seniors On The Rise

NEW YORK:  Self-reported marijuana use by those age 50 and older is increasing, according to demographic data published online ahead of print in the journal Addiction.

Researchers at New York University’s School of Medicine and at Columbia University evaluated marijuana use patterns for those over 50 years of age for the years 2006 to 2013.  Investigators reported that the prevalence of past-year cannabis use rose approximately 60 percent for those age 50 to 64, and increased 250 percent for those over 65 years of age. Overall, use rates increased 71 percent (from 2.8 percent in 2006 to 4.8 percent in 2013) for all of the respondents.

Authors reported that marijuana use was significantly higher among older males than among females (6.8 percent to 3 percent). Those respondents who reported suffering from two or more chronic medical conditions were more likely to use cannabis than those who did not.

“We found a significant increase in the prevalence of past-year cannabis use in the US among older adults from 2006/2007 through 2012/2013, with large relative increases particularly among those ages 65 and older,” they concluded. “This increase in cannabis use is not unanticipated given the high rates of substance use among the Baby Boomer generation. … Given that the majority of Baby Boomers have still not yet reached the age 65, we will likely continue to see the trends continue into the next decade.”