Medical Marijuana NY-Based Biotech Company Enters Clinical Trials

NEW YORK:  AXIM Biotechnologies, Inc., a world leader in cannabinoid research and development, has entered clinical trials on treating irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with the Company’s CanChew Plus cannabidiol (CBD) gum at Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

Human Clinical Trials Detail Include:

  • Controlled-release hemp oil CBD chewing gum and matching placebo gums will be tested for the clinical studies
  • The amount of the hemp oil CBD gum is set at 50mg of CBD per serving
  • Per the trial protocol patients can use up to 6 chewing gums a day to control their stomach cramps, bloating, pain and other symptom
  • The main study outcome is perceived pain reduction. Furthermore, the study will record general relief and change in stool frequenc

The clinical trial will include a group of 40 patients, age 18-65, diagnosed with IBS according to ROME III criteria to determine the effectiveness of CanChew Plus in alleviating IBS symptoms

“The clinical trial at Wageningen University is the first of its kind to treat IBS symptoms by cannabinoid-containing chewing gum, and we look forward to sharing updates from the trial with you,” added Anastassov.

 “With positive outcome from the IBS clinical trial, we will be ready to proceed immediately with further trials on our pharmaceutical grade CanChew Rx products to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. We are committed to finding research-based cannabinoid

Holland’s New Marijuana Laws Are Changing Old Amsterdam

NETHERLANDS:  The last time Derrick Bergman came to Amsterdam to buy cannabis, he did so behind a locked door with a long, thick curtain obscuring his activity from the canal-lined residential street outside, in the quiet Lastage neighborhood. The secretary of the Netherlands’s Union for the Abolition of Cannabis Prohibition, Bergman comes here to weekly gatherings of a two-month-old—and seriously clandestine—“cannabis social club” called the Tree of Life, because it’s the only place in town he can find one of his favorite strains: Super Silver Haze.

Since 1976, authorities across the Netherlands have chosen to openly ignore that cannabis use is illegal here, and they prosecute no one in possession of less than five grams of marijuana for personal use. The policy, called gedoogbeleid, is known as the “Dutch model,” and it’s why hundreds of “coffee shops” sprung up across Amsterdam and the Netherlands, luring marijuana connoisseurs from across the globe to one of the few places they could roll and smoke a joint without fear. But that’s no longer the case.

While U.S. States Relax Marijuana Laws, Pot Haven Netherlands Cracks Down, With Mixed Success

NETHERLANDS: A young man at a bus stop hisses at a passer-by: “What you looking for … marijuana?” It’s a scene of street peddling that the Netherlands hoped to stamp out in the 1970s when it launched a policy of tolerating “coffee shops” where people could buy and smoke pot freely.

But Maastricht’s street dealers are back, local residents complain. And the reason is a crackdown on coffee-shops triggered by another problem: Pot tourists who crossed the border to visit the cafes and made a nuisance of themselves by snarling traffic, dumping litter and even urinating in the streets. [Read more…]

Forget Marijuana Madness: Could Marijuana Treat Your Depression

NETHERLANDS: Depending on who you listen to, marijuana could be the solution for whatever ails you or your ultimate demise; or it could make you dumb and sick. We have a tendency to believe the research not funded by biased parties in support of federal marijuana prohibition—the research that shows cannabis may reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s and obesity, kill cancer cells, and even treat depression. [Read more…]

Report: Dutch Lessons For U.S. Marijuana Policy

NETHERLANDS: A new report from the Open Society Global Drug Policy Program finds that the Dutch have effectively separated the markets for marijuana and hard drugs, leading to the “lowest rate of problem drug use in Europe”.

The report titled “Coffee Shops and Compromise: Separated Illicit Drug Markets in the Netherlands” finds that only 14 percent of Dutch cannabis users say they can get other drugs from their weed dealer. By contrast in Sweden, 52 percent of pot smokers say they can buy other drugs from their pot sources. The Netherlands has the lowest rate of problem drug use in Europe, the report finds. [Read more…]