Nebraska Tribe Interested In Growing Marijuana

NEBRASKA: About an hour and half north of the city of Omaha, the Omaha Tribe of Nebraska sits on 300 square miles of reservation land stretching into Iowa’s Monona County.

“We need jobs,” Daniel Webster said, who lives on the reservation.

KETV reports, historical issues such as poverty and unemployment have reached critical levels.

“Right now, my community has a 69 percent unemployment rate,” Omaha Tribe of Nebraska chairman Vernon Miller said.

Miller said the dire economy is leading to desperate solutions.

 

After Federal Raids, U.S. Tribes Cautioned About Marijuana

NEW MEXICO: Tribes across the U.S. are finding marijuana is risky business nearly a year after a Justice Department policy indicated they could grow and sell pot under the same guidelines as states.

Federal raids on tribal cannabis operations in California followed by a South Dakota tribe’s move this month to burn its crop amid fears it could be next have raised questions over whether there’s more to complying with DOJ standards than a department memo suggested last December.

The uncertainty — blamed partly on thin DOJ guidelines, the fact that marijuana remains an illegal drug under federal laws, and a complex tangle of state, federal and tribal law enforcement oversight on reservations — has led attorneys to urge tribal leaders to weigh the risks involved before moving forward with legalizing and growing pot.

“Everybody who is smart is pausing to look at the feasibility and risks of growing hemp and marijuana,” said Lance Gumbs, a former chairman of the Shinnecock Tribe in New York and regional vice president of the National Congress of American Indians. “But are we giving up on it? Absolutely not.”

These Native American Tribes Legalized Weed, But That Didn’t Stop Them From Getting Raided By The Feds

CALIFORNIA:  In the foggy early morning hours of Wednesday, July 8, special agents from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Drug Enforcement Administration and state and local law enforcement descended on the Pit River Tribe’s XL Ranch and the Alturas Indian Rancheria in northeastern California, seizing 12,000 marijuana plants and 100 pounds of processed pot from the two large-scale growing facilities.

The Alturas Indian Rancheria and the XL Ranch are located on opposite sides of the town of Alturas, California. The tribes that operate them, Alturas and Pit River, are separate federally recognized tribes, but are descended from the same 11 bands of Achumawi- and Atsugewi-speaking peoples that called the region home long before the arrival of white settlers.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office has not yet filed any charges against the tribes or individuals related to the raid. The office declined to comment on the ongoing investigation.

Pit River tribal leaders have declared the raid a violation of their sovereign rights. “We are very disappointed with the decision of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, as the lead federal agency, to descend on sovereign land with an army of nearly fifty law enforcement officers,” Pit River Tribal Chairman Mickey Gemmill Jr. said in a press release. “That the BIA would take such a disrespectful approach to an Indian tribe on its own land is a serious assault to the Tribe’s right to self-governance.”

Tribe’s OK Of Marijuana Brings South Dakota AG Warning

SOUTH DAKOTA:  The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe in eastern South Dakota plans to sell marijuana by Jan. 1; but that prompts a warning from the SD attorney general that tribal laws won’t protect non-Native Americans, nor anyone off tribal land.

The Santee Sioux will grow marijuana at one site; hopefully earning a monthly profit of $2 million according to an Associated Press story.

In a news release, South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley stated that while he respects each tribe’s authority to pass laws, people also have to recognize South Dakota’s laws prohibiting “physical possession, distribution, and manufacture of marijuana by all non-Indian persons anywhere in South Dakota including within Indian Country; and all Indian persons outside of Indian Country.”

Penticton Indian Band Considers Medical Marijuana Cultivation

CANADA:  The Penticton Indian Band is looking into cultivating medical marijuana on their land, after being contacted by a company interested in doing so.

Chief Jonathan Kruger said they were recently approached by Kaneh Bosm BioTechnology to see if the band was interested in doing a joint venture.

“The PIB is going through a land use planning process with the community and there is a long list the commuity created of what they would like to see, and medical marijuana and hemp production was on that list,” he said.

Band members put the cultivation on the list because some band members are using medical marijuana for healing. Many have also shared their heartbreaking stories of complications using other medication, which have really been eye opening, said the chief.