Acreage Announces Sale Of Maryland Dispensary

NEW YORK: Acreage Holdings, Inc., a vertically integrated, multi-state operator of cannabis licenses and assets in the U.S., today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement with an undisclosed buyer, pursuant to which the Buyer, when permitted by state law, will purchase all of the issued and outstanding membership interests of Maryland Medicinal Research & Caring, LLC. MMRC is licensed to operate a medical cannabis dispensary in Baltimore, Maryland.

The terms of the deal were not disclosed.  Due to regulatory restrictions regarding license transfers, the Buyer, upon approval by the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission, will enter into a managed services agreement with MMRC until the requisite time has elapsed before Acreage and the Buyer can close the transaction under the definitive agreement.  Closing of the transaction is contingent upon regulatory approvals.

“The sale of our Maryland dispensary is another step forward in our refocused strategy to accelerate our pathway to profitability,” said Bill Van Faasen, Interim Chief Executive Officer of Acreage. “It follows our divestiture in North Dakota, plus other cost-cutting measures completed earlier this year.  We are moving forward with our refocused plan as quickly as possible and we will continue to update shareholders on our progress as new events transpire.”

Four Things To Know Before Growing Marijuana For Business

Every business is potentially profitable, if know how to operate it. The most important quality you need to have as a businessman is the love for the work you do. It’s not a myth or quote by some old man. All experienced businessmen believe that you are unlikely to fail if you love your business. The love for CBD is constantly increasing, and so its usage. Most of those people will buy it and some smart people will grow it.

It’s not as difficult as you might think. There are already many people doing the same thing, but the demand is so high that you are unlikely to fail in this industry. You can learn everything online and get to farm a thing you love. You won’t just be doing it for the money. It will have your heart in it, and you will always try to grow the best possible product. Here are a few things you should know before getting started to help you along the way.

Make Sure You Know Everything About Marijuana

While love is important, knowledge has no replacement. You need to learn everything you can about growing marijuana and the dos and don’ts before making any investments. If you think that you will learn on the job, you are not wrong. However, each lesson comes at a cost. That’s why it’s best to learn all these things before taking any step.

Pick the Best Strains

For the best product, you are going to need the best strains. You need two things for that—a reliable best seed bank and full knowledge of its types and qualities. Be sure to choose the strains that best fit your growing space. Choose a seed bank only from the top ones and build long term professional relationship with it to ensure your business grows smoothly.

Know Your Light Needs

Cannabis plants need a lot of light. You have to specially plan their power needs if you are growing in an indoor space. They need 400W to 600W of light for about 18 hours every day. You will need to buy the best quality lights and other electrical equipment like extractor and fans. Many residential power circuits can’t support more than 1500W, so you will have to take decisions accordingly.

Plan Finances in the Business Plan

Every business needs money to run. You will start to get a profit that you can reinvest later, but you will have to arrange a lot of finances at the beginning. It is suggested to create a full-fledged business plan and answer all questions of all categories after doing thorough research and brainstorming. This will help you efficiently plan your finances. Once you know exactly how much money you need, you can get to the struggles of arranging it. You can easily get a loan when you are sure to get the return according to your business plan.

How To Make and Cook With THC Coconut Oil

Making and cooking with THC coconut oil is not as difficult as it may sound. It is a nifty way to consume cannabis. You can bake cannabis coconut oil into different types of edibles or take it alone. Most cannabis strains complement the flavor of coconut oil. You can use Sativa, Indica, or other higher CBD strains of cannabis to get your desired effect. However, you will often need a canna-butter while cooking with cannabis.

If you have certain dietary restrictions or follow a vegan lifestyle, butter may not be an option for you. Fortunately, when it comes to binding to different types of plant or animal-based fats, cannabis does not discriminate. CBD and THC molecules tether easily to fat molecules since they are fat-soluble and lipophilic. In other words, they dissolve in fats quite easily. When you bind cannabis in this manner, you will enhance its benefits more than when you use alcohol or water bases.

Making THC coconut oil is very easy. It is also a great way to use up hash, kief, or trim from harvest. It is not necessary to overcomplicate the process or simmer it for a long time. The method outlined below will give you fancy, tasty, and potent cannabis coconut oil.

What You Will Need

To begin with, you will need a large measuring cup or bowl, cheesecloth, bowl to store the THC coconut oil, and sieve. You will also need two cups of unrefined coconut oil and 40 grams of decarboxylated cannabis. You can learn how to decarboxylate cannabis by doing a simple Google search.

Dosing, Strains, and Expectations

1.5 grams of trim per one tablespoon of cannabis coconut oil is quite a strong dose. It is ideal for people who suffer from frequent migraines, which require a stronger dose. You can use anywhere from 0.5 to 1.5 grams of hash, bud, or trim per tablespoon of coconut oil. If this is your first time making and cooking with THC coconut oil, 16 grams of cannabis to two cups of coconut oil should serve you well.

If you prefer to use buds instead of trim, using a bit less is okay. This is because there will be more trichomes, which translates to more THC. Therefore, if you choose to use buds in the batch above, you should probably use 0.5 grams of buds for each tablespoon of coconut oil.

If you choose to take cannabis orally, it can take quite a while to feel it. However, the effects will probably linger for much longer. Cannabis coconut oil, on the other hand, it very potent and will likely make you sleepy. Therefore, if you have obligations later, do not take a new dose. Alternatively, you can use only Sativas in your coconut oil to combat sleepiness.

Combine the Cannabis and Coconut Oil and Simmer

Combine the coconut oil and cannabis in a saucepan and simmer over the lowest heat possible. Once the oil melts, let the mixture simmer for an hour while stirring every so often. If it turns out not green at all or too green, it is okay. The color does not have anything to do with the strength of cannabis coconut oil.

You need to use your cheesecloth in a sieve to strain the mixture over your measuring cup. Pour the hot mixture into the cheesecloth and let it drip for about an hour. Afterward, squeeze the rest out by hand. Finally, pour the THC coconut oil into a bowl or glass jar and leave it uncovered to cool. Once it is cool, close the container and store it in a cool dark place or the refrigerator.

Cooking With THC Coconut Oil

If this is your first time using THC coconut oil, try taking a tiny amount by mouth to test its potency. Before taking any more, however, you will need to wait at least three to four hours. This will help you get a baseline for how to use it on food and whether you need to increase or decrease the dose.

If you choose to cook with THC coconut oil, you should use recipes you are familiar with. Knowing how many slices of cake, muffins, or cookies that your recipe produces will help you figure out how much of the cannabis coconut oil you need to use per serving. If you need your edibles to be less potent, you can use half butter and half THC oil.

WSLCB Invitation For Public Comment: Draft Conceptual Rules For Marijuana Business Premise Certificate of Compliance

WASHINGTON: The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (WSLCB) is seeking public comment regarding draft conceptual rules. These draft conceptual rules are narrowly scoped to include a new rule subsection that provides a marijuana business premise certificate of compliance.  A draft, conceptual version of WAC 314-55-020 is linked here. The new subsection (6) is highlighted in blue.

Background
On July 8, 2020, the WSLCB filed a pre-proposal statement of inquiry (CR 101) to consider amending WAC 314-55-020 to establish a certificate of compliance for marijuana business premises consistent with the mandates of Substitute Senate Bill (SSB) 6206 (Chapter 154, Laws of 2020). The CR-101 filing and supporting documents are located here.

Specifically, SSB 6206 amended RCW 69.50.331 to create a certificate of compliance for marijuana business premises, and became effective June 11, 2020. The amendment requires the Board to issue a certificate of compliance for a marijuana business applicant’s premises, if the premises met the distance requirements from restricted entities (such as parks, schools, and playgrounds) at the time the application was filed. The certificate allows the licensee to operate the business at the proposed location notwithstanding a later occurring, otherwise disqualifying factor regarding restricted entities.

The WSLCB invites and encourages your comment on the draft conceptual rule language offered as WAC 314-55-020 (6). Your feedback will be reviewed and considered before a CR 102, or rule proposal, is presented to the Board for approval.

Public Comment
Please forward your comments to Casey Schaufler at casey.schaufler@lcb.wa.gov by September 4, 2020. The CR102 proposal is anticipated to be presented to the Board on or after September 30, 2020.

Planet 13 Awarded Nevada Dispensary License

Planet 13 awarded Nevada retail cannabis license through settlement of the lawsuit against the Nevada Department of Taxation

NEVADA:  Planet 13 Holdings Inc., a leading vertically-integrated Nevada cannabis company, today announced it has agreed to a settlement of its ongoing lawsuit against the Nevada Department of Taxation and other parties which subsequently joined the litigation. As part of the Settlement, Planet 13 is receiving one provisional adult-use dispensary license in unincorporated Clark County, Nevada. The License will be used to re-open Planet 13’s former dispensary located at 4850 Sunset Road in Las Vegas, Nevada that closed on October 30, 2018 (the “Medizin Dispensary”).

“We’ve always known that as one of the top operators in Nevada, responsible for 9% of the state’s sales, we deserved to win a license from the Nevada Department of Taxation. Although we are not happy with how long the process took for us to obtain the license to re-open our original location, we are thrilled to be able to service our loyal customers who supported Planet 13 from day one,” said Larry Scheffler, Co-CEO of Planet 13. “The Medizin Dispensary at 4850 Sunset Road in Las Vegas is a fully built-out 4,750 sq. ft. store that offers the same dedication to customer service, high-quality products, and innovation that Planet 13 is known for, all in a compact footprint designed to compliment its local neighborhood.”

The Medizin Dispensary was closed on October 30, 2018, to transfer the license to the Planet 13 SuperStore located next to the Las Vegas Strip. During the last full quarter of operations, Q3 2018, the Medizin Dispensary generated $4.9 million in revenue with a gross margin of 53%. The Medizin Dispensary requires no additional CAPEX to open.

First Half 2020 Tax Revenues Top $39 Million From Oklahoma Medical Marijuana

OKLAHOMA:  According to statistics released by the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority (OMMA), the Sooner State generated more than $39 Million in tax revenues from its robust medical marijuana program in the first half of 2020.

Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority Names New Director

OKLAHOMA:  The deputy director of the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority will serve as interim director of the authority, officials announced Friday.

Kelly Williams replaces Travis Kirkpatrick, who was recently named deputy commissioner of prevention and preparedness at the Oklahoma State Department of Health.

Kirkpatrick, who will oversee the OMMA from his new position, chose Williams for the interim post. Kirkpatrick had been named director of the authority in January after serving as interim director for about three months.

“This is a young agency and we have seen massive growth over the past two years,” Williams said in a statement. “I look forward to the challenges and the rewards of growing the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority into an agency that will make Oklahomans proud.”

Nevada CCB Launches Investigations Into Three Nevada Dispensaries, Selling Potentially Unsafe Product

NEVADA: The Nevada Cannabis Compliance Board (CCB) has opened investigations into three dispensaries for selling product that twice failed microbial testing.

On March 5, 2020, the Department of Taxation and CCB issued a directive to all dispensary/retail stores to immediately stop selling the product, Cherry OG F3, which failed laboratory testing for yeast and mold, coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae and Aspergillus.

At that time, the CCB instructed dispensary/retail stores to destroy or return the affected product to the cultivator and communicate that they took such action with the State. Despite the CCB’s directive, it appears three dispensaries retained their inventory of Cherry OG and began selling the product again in May.

Approximately 375 grams of the Cherry OG product were sold between May 19, 2020 and June 29, 2020 at the following Retail Stores/Medical Dispensaries:

1. Waveseer of Las Vegas, LLC (Jenny’s Dispensary), 5530 N Decatur Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89130 (License # 83760475147127946601);

2. Paradise Wellness Center, LLC (Las Vegas ReLeaf), 2244 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, NV 89104 (License # 54283805068313943868); and

3. Desert Aire Wellness, LLC (Sahara Wellness), 420 E Sahara Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89104 (License # 25729455103203031356)

On May 16, 2020, a hold on the product was temporarily lifted due to a CCB error that occurred during an unrelated investigation. However, the CCB’s health and safety advisory remained in effect; and under the directive, dispensaries should not have had the product in their inventory.

The CCB advises those who have purchased the product to avoid consuming it. Consumers should check any Cherry OG products for the source package # 1A404030000076F000006649. The CCB notified the aforementioned dispensaries and initiated investigations which are ongoing. There are no known reports of illness.

Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission Issues Second Amended Quarantine Order for Vaporizer Products

Cannabis Control Commission Issues Second Amended Quarantine Order for Vaporizer Products

Following the agency’s three-phased testing and public comment period, licensees may retest and release, or destroy quarantined products subject to order requirements

MASSACHUSETTS:The Cannabis Control Commission (Commission) has issued a Second Amended Quarantine Order Applying to Vaporizer Products following three phases of testing and a public comment period which examined conditions that could allow for the retest and sale of vaporizer products that were previously quarantined since December. Under the second amended order, licensees may retest and release—or destroy—certain products with enhanced warning labels, depending on testing and remediation outcomes, and compliance with Commission regulations and policies. The order emphasizes that measured, transparent testing mitigates, but does not eliminate, all public health risks posed by quarantined vaporizer products.

This latest action modifies previous Commission quarantine orders issued in November and December 2019 and related investigative findings from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that identified vitamin E acetate (VEA) as a chemical of concern among people with e-cigarette, or vaping, product-use associated lung injury (EVALI). On December 12, 2019, the Commission issued the First Amended Quarantine Order authorizing licensees to sell newly manufactured vaporizer products, but requiring that more than 600,000 vaporizer products manufactured before December 12, 2019 remain subject to quarantine.

“Since the Commonwealth declared a vaping public health emergency last fall, the Commission has dedicated significant energy and resources to investigating the additives, hardware, and storage practices that licensees use to produce and sell cannabis vaporizer products,” Commission Executive Director Shawn Collins said. “Fortunately, repeat tests of licensed product samples did not return any detectable levels of VEA; unfortunately, they did establish that heavy metal contamination may increase in vaping products over time.

“This new order seeks to strike a balance between those products that can be retested or remediated safely for sale or repurposing with proper warning to patients and consumers, and those that cannot. As the nation continues to learn more about the broader health implications of vaping in all forms, I urge patients and consumers to understand the risks when they choose to consume any cannabis vaporizer product.”

The Commission’s regulations require all marijuana products to undergo contaminant testing, including testing for heavy metals, by an Independent Testing Laboratory accredited to the International Organization for Standardization 17025 (ISO/IEC 17025: 2017) and in accordance with the Commission’s Protocol for Sampling and Analysis of Finished Medical Marijuana Products and Marijuana-infused Products.

Under the second amended order, previously quarantined products may be:

  • Disposed. Licensees may voluntarily dispose of previously quarantined vaping products at any time, subject to Commission disposal regulations.
    • Production batches that previously failed both Commission-initiated tests for heavy metals shall be deemed unable to be remediated and face mandatory disposal, if, after two attempts at remediation, the product does not pass testing for heavy metals. Respondents may dispose of such products voluntarily or upon receiving an order of destruction from the Commission.
  • Retested and Released. Previously quarantined products may be made available for sale if they are first retested and deemed compliant with the Commission’s regulations and policies, subject to conditions specified in the order.
  • Reclaimed. Previously quarantined products may also be repurposed into other products using the reclaimed marijuana oil, although any new product manufactured with that oil must undergo testing and include a statement indicating to the patient or consumer that the product was manufactured with previously quarantined material.

If, after two attempts at remediation, retested or reclaimed products do not pass testing for heavy metals, they will be considered unable to be remediated and must be disposed. Vaporizer products with original testing dates in excess of one year are considered expired and may not be dispensed, sold, transferred or otherwise conveyed until another screen for all contaminants, excluding pesticides, is conducted. In accordance with Commission regulations, licensees must notify the agency of any vaporizer product test result exceeding acceptable levels for heavy metals and describe the method for remediation or disposal.

The second amended order also specifies labeling requirements for all vaporizer products sold by licensees in the Commonwealth, including, but not limited to those products that are retested or reclaimed in accordance with the second amended order:

  • Labels on previously vaporized products that pass retesting and are made available for sale must disclose, “This product was previously quarantined. Passed retesting for heavy metals and Vitamin E Acetate. Store at room temperature.”
  • Labels on previously vaporized products that have their marijuana concentrate reclaimed for other marijuana products must disclose, “This product was produced using previously quarantined concentrate. Passed retesting for heavy metals and Vitamin E Acetate. Store at room temperature.”

Retailers and Medical Marijuana Treatment Centers (MTCs) must include in the sale of vaporizer products a disclosure that the patient or consumer may request to inspect a copy of the product’s associated testing results. Disposable and reusable vaporizer pens also must include a product insert that identifies the materials used in the device’s atomizer coil. Any quarantined vaping product that is resold also must include the item’s original packaging date.

The Commission has mandated that Marijuana Product Manufacturers retain certain records pertaining to marijuana vaporizer ingredients, additives, devices, component parts, or other materials purchased from any manufacturer or supplier; the name and business address of the manufacturer of any cartridge, battery, atomizer coil (and its materials used), hardware, or other component of marijuana vaporizer products; and the Certificate of Analysis for each thickening agent, thinning agent, and terpene infused or incorporated into a marijuana vaporizer device during production.

Starting last December, the Commission conducted three phases of testing into vaporizer products manufactured and sold by licensees. Results are available on the Commission’s website under MassCannabisControl.Com/Documents.

The Commission’s first two testing phases investigated VEA and heavy metal (lead) levels in samples of vaporizer products collected from geographically diverse locations. Phase III involved confirmatory tests of certain products that failed for heavy metal concentrations above the acceptable limits for inhalation (500 ppb), and found varying results, to suggest that heavy metal contamination may increase over time. Testing limitations identified during the investigation included limited sampling scope, product batch homogeneity, inconsistent extraction procedures for testing finished cartridge samples, and lack of known sources of metal contamination. VEA has not been detected in any Commission-initiated testing.

After testing methods precluded reliable results, the Commission determined further investigation and collaboration was necessary before issuing a second amended order pertaining to the quarantined vaping products. A survey was issued on July 2, 2020 to obtain public comment from government, industry, scientific, and public health stakeholders, among other constituents, including patients and consumers, to help identify the root cause of the heavy metal contamination, the health effects of elevated lead levels, and whether heavy metal content within vaporizer products could become more prominent without use over time or post-use. The survey closed on July 14, 2020 and public comments are currently available on the Commission’s website under MassCannabisControl.Com/Documents.

The Commission continues to research and evaluate information relative to vaporizer device product manufacturing processes and safety standards in furtherance of its obligation to ensure a safely regulated industry.

Surna Announces Largest Contract In Its History

Announces $2.8 million Sales Contract in July

COLORADO: Surna announced today that it recently signed a sales contract valued at $2.8 million.

The project in Illinois is for a multi-state operator with whom Surna has worked on previous facilities in other states. The facility is approximately 88,000 square feet, of which approximately 66,000 square feet is dedicated to cultivation, drying and processing areas. Surna is under contract to provide a full suite of climate control products and technologies for the cultivation and processing spaces (the mechanical engineering design was done by Surna through a previous contract), supply of major mechanical equipment, SentryIQ environmental controls, and system start-up. While Surna can and does provide MEP design and equipment for a wide range of climate control approaches, in this case the priorities of reducing electrical infrastructure requirements and reducing roof loading, along with the desire for precise control of the facility’s environment, resulted in the selection of a 4-pipe hydronic system. The design has integrated dehumidification, in which Surna is providing its proprietary line of multi-function fan coils, destratification fans, dehumidifiers and heat recovery chillers.

Tony McDonald, CEO commented: “The team at Surna has worked diligently to secure the largest single contract in the Company’s history. Now our operations and controls departments will be hard at work ensuring the delivery of a precisely controlled environment and on-time delivery of equipment to meet our customer’s requirements.”