How To Pick A Cannabis Consultant Or Lawyer For Your AGCO Retail Dispensary In The Greater Toronto Area Or Ontario

CANADA:  The regulation of cannabis in Canada has come a long way to where it is today. Since the federal legalization took place, it has proven to be an area that is performing relatively well. However, it’s still a sector that’s highly regulated; in essence, a prospective business owner has to go through stringent processes before being granted a license to operate.

To increase your chances of being granted a license, it’s always recommended that a person seeks legal and consultancy assistance. There are several cannabis consultants in the Greater Toronto and Ontario. Choosing one can be the difference between success and failure.

The purpose of a cannabis consultant is to provide their clients with vital information especially in the areas that they are lacking in knowledge. Besides the horticultural aspect of consultancy, a good adviser should also educate potential business owners about the facility design.

The following is a detailed guide that’ll help you with finding the right cannabis lawyer or consultant:

Things to Consider When Choosing a Cannabis Consultant or Lawyer

Given the popularity of the cannabis industry, it’s quite unfortunate to learn that multiple unscrupulous firms have cropped up claiming to be cannabis consultants. To make matters worse, many naive business owners have fallen prey to them. Here’s how you can avoid such pitfalls and pick the right adviser.

Probing the Advisers

When you’ll be looking for the right adviser, it’s very important to thoroughly vet the person. If you notice that a prospective consultant is quite reserved or hesitant in giving you answers, that may be an indication that he or she isn’t worth hiring. Consultants are vastly knowledgeable and are very quick to offer advice. Some of the questions you shouldn’t fail to ask include the number of years they’ve been in the field, relevant credentials and certification, their current and past clients, and the amount of time he or she will dedicate to you.\

Watch out for the red flags

As you search for the most qualified adviser who’d help you, it’s also good to be on the lookout to avoid anything that can potentially ruin your chances of getting a license. Some examples of red flags you should watch out for include; being asked for equity, a consultant who’s reluctant to track time, not being treated as a partner, and avoiding to answer your questions adequately.

Identify your Needs

Before you seek consultancy services, you should first and foremost understand the specific needs of your business venture. This will help you in determining the particular type of consulting you require as well as providing you with a clear picture of the amount you’ll be willing to pay for that service. Due to the complexity of this industry, this area tends to be a field that has many consulting firms. Thus, you should only go for a person who specializes in a particular niche.

On many occasions, business owners find themselves requiring more than one consultancy service. Even though it may appear costly, the person seeking the services will end up gaining a lot in the long run.

Understanding the Consultancy Process

When it comes to cannabis consultancy, different business owners usually have varying needs. The consultancy process tends to follow three fundamental stages.

Problem definition

This stage usually seeks to identify the particular need of the client and how he or she can work along with the consultant to facilitate a successful outcome.

Business Licensing

Apart from facing other startup challenges, acquiring a cannabis license is usually a difficult hurdle on its own. This step involves acquiring the right license for the client’s business.

Compliance 

For your business to remain operational, it should always comply with the set guidelines in the industry. The Consultant’s work at this stage would be to ensure that your business remains compliant and attains profitability

Conclusion

Getting the help of a cannabis adviser or lawyer is a crucial step before anyone begins operating a cannabis retail dispensary. For any consultancy services to work perfectly, there has to be a positive relationship between both parties. Honesty and timely communication can help in cementing a solid relationship. If you’re searching for the appropriate adviser in Greater Toronto or Ontario, be sure the following the guidelines provided above.

Oregon: OLCC Commission Approves Marijuana Licensee Stipulated Settlements

OREGON: At its regular monthly meeting on August 20, 2020, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission approved six marijuana violation stipulated settlement agreements. The Commission also ratified the following violation fines and suspensions based on stipulated settlements (detailed information on specific cases can be found here on the OLCC website):

  • KALEAFA GRESHAM in Gresham will pay a fine of $7,000 for one violation, consolidating multiple packaging and labeling violations, against its recreational marijuana retailer license.

Licensee is: 1450 SE Orient, LLC; Chris Ostlund, Member; WWMP, LLC, Member; 3 Kids, Inc., Member; John Widmer, President/Stockholder; Julie Widmer, Secretary/Stockholder; Visionary Enterprises, Inc., Member; Rod Maguire, President/Stockholder; Melissa Maguire, Secretary/Stockholder.

KALEAFA will pay a fine of $28,000 for one violation, consolidating multiple packaging and labeling violations, against its recreational marijuana wholesaler license.

Licensees are: WWMP, LLC; 3 Kids, Inc., Member; John Widmer, President/Stockholder; Julie Widmer, Secretary/Stockholder; Visionary Enterprises, Inc., Member; Rod Maguire, President/Stockholder; Melissa Maguire, Secretary/Stockholder.

  • CANNA FLOW FARMS will pay a fine of $6,435 OR serve a 39-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for two violations.

Licensees are: CannaFlo Farms, LLC; Jeffrey Schlageter, Member.

  • IVY CANNABIS will pay a fine of $4,125 OR serve a 25-day recreational marijuana wholesaler license suspension for three violations.

Licensees are: Attikus Enterprises, Inc.; Matthew Schwimmer, President/Stockholder; David Schwimmer, Vice President/Secretary/Stockholder.

  • MODERN FOREST in Lebanon will pay a fine of $14,025 OR serve an 85-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension for two violations.

Licensee is: Modern Forest, LLC; Charles Troxell, Member; Laura Troxell, Member; Sven Roberts, Member; Amber Roberts, Member.

  • BUTTE CREEK FARMS will pay a fine of $14,850 OR serve a 90-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for four violations.

Licensees are: Butte Creek Ranch Farm 1100, LLC; Thor Thompson, Member; Deborah Gadberry, Member; Tyler Lennick, Member.

125 Groups Urge Congressional Action On The MORE Act

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, Drug Policy Alliance, and 123 other national and state organizations today called on House Leadership to swiftly advance the bipartisan Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act (H.R. 3884) to the House floor when Congress returns in September. The MORE Act, the most comprehensive marijuana justice legislation to be considered in Congress, is needed now more than ever to alleviate economic hardship caused by COVID-19 and meet the calls for justice reform echoing all across America.

“In November 2019, the House Judiciary Committee made history when it advanced the MORE Act, becoming the first congressional body to vote favorably for a marijuana de-scheduling bill. Since that time, the circumstances of 2020 have made the failed War on Drugs even more untenable and amplified the voices of those demanding transformation in our criminal legal system. In the face of the evolving COVID-19 pandemic and a growing national dialogue on unjust law enforcement practices, marijuana reform as a modest first step at chipping away at the War on Drugs is more relevant and more pressing than ever before. The MORE Act remains the most effective and equitable way forward,” the groups said in the letter.

The MORE Act, a sweeping marijuana measure that addresses criminal justice reform, racial justice, and equity, would:

  • Remove marijuana from the list of Schedule 1 drugs under the Controlled Substances Act, thus decriminalizing the substance at the federal level and enabling states to set their own policy, expanding research opportunities, and broadening access to medical marijuana to underserved populations such as veterans.
  • Emphasize reparative justice, establishing social equity programs that acknowledge those who have been most impacted under criminalization by building community infrastructure and diversifying the regulated marijuana marketplace.
  • Provide for the expungement and re-sentencing of marijuana offenses.
  • Prevent the government from denying an individual federal benefits, student financial aid, or security clearances needed to obtain government jobs because of marijuana use.
  • Protect non-citizens from immigration consequences due to marijuana activity, including non-citizens working in state-legal marijuana marketplaces.

The MORE Act is supported by the Marijuana Justice Coalition as well 125 national and state organizations.

The signatories and letter are available here.

Maine: 17 New Adult Use Conditional Licenses Issued

MAINE: How big is Maine’s new adult-use cannabis industry? According to the Maine Office of Marijuana Policy, there are 17 new adult use conditional licenses. The breakdown includes seven marijuana stores, five cultivation facilities, four products manufacturing facilities, and one testing facility.

FDA Issues Draft Guidance To Encourage Cannabis-Related Clinical Research

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  The following quote is attributed to FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Amy Abernethy M.D., Ph.D.:

“A range of stakeholders have expressed interest in development of drugs that contain cannabis and compounds found in cannabis. Recent legislative changes have also opened new opportunities for cannabis clinical research. As that body of research progresses and grows, the FDA is working to support drug development in this area.

“It is critical that the FDA continues to do what we can to support the science needed to develop new drugs from cannabis. The FDA believes the drug approval process represents the best way to ensure that safe and effective new medicines, including any drugs that contain cannabis or cannabis-derived compounds, are available to patients in need of appropriate medical therapy.

“The agency is committed to supporting the development of these new drugs through the investigational new drug, drug review and drug approval processes – and one key element of this support involves development of guidance, like this one.”

  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration last week issued “Cannabis and Cannabis-Derived Compounds: Quality Considerations for Clinical Research, Draft Guidance for Industry,” which describes the FDA’s current thinking on several topics relevant to clinical research related to the development of drugs containing cannabis or cannabis-derived compounds.
  • The draft guidance covers sources of cannabis for clinical research, information on quality considerations and recommendations regarding calculating tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels.
  • The draft guidance also introduces key FDA regulatory concepts to stakeholders who may be less familiar with the FDA and the FDA’s authorities.

Recap: Nevada Cannabis Compliance Board’s Inaugural Board Meeting

NEVADA: This week the Nevada Cannabis Compliance Board (CCB) held its first board meeting at the Grant Sawyer Building. Led by former Nevada Supreme Court Chief Justice Michael Douglas, who serves as Chair, the CCB moved to approve its core set of regulations, the Nevada Cannabis Compliance Regulations (NCCR 1-14).

Moving forward, the NCCR 1-14 will guide regulation of the cannabis industry in this State. Within those regulations, some highlights include: -An increase to all civil penalty categories (NCCR 4). -A more expansive and comprehensive licensing and approval structure for cannabis companies, owners and employees (NCCR 5). -Enhanced requirements for cannabis testing facilities, including more transparency of results (NCCR 11).

Additionally, the CCB voted to lift the extended review period, now allowing for the processing of transfers of interest. The extended review period was put into place last year, at the recommendation of the special task force, formed by Governor Steve Sisolak, to ensure a more thorough and appropriate vetting process within the cannabis industry.

Lastly, the CCB approved a disciplinary settlement with CWNevada, which held 14 licenses and certificates in this State. The settlement includes the revocation of six licenses, a fine of $1.25 million, remittance of all taxes owed in the amount of $1.5 million, and the forced sale of all remaining licenses to pay back owed employee wages and other financial obligations.

All registered owners of CWNevada will not be allowed to collect any proceeds from the sale and could face additional discipline. The full board meeting can be viewed here. The final NCCR 1-14 can be found here

Washington: WSLCB Virtual Listen and Learn Forum: Rules Regarding Tier 1 Producer Licensing, Session #1

WASHINGTON: The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (WSLCB) is hosting two Listen and Learn forums about the current rules regarding marijuana producer licenses, specifically the consideration of revisions and new rule sections that would incrementally expand the plant canopy square footage allowed for licensed Tier 1 producers. This is the first of two planned sessions. Session #1 will cover WAC 314-55-075 Sections 1 through 5. Session #2 will focus on Sections 6 through 11. The full text of WAC 314-55-075 is provided here.

Please join us virtually on Tuesday, June 23, 2020, from 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. via WebEx in alignment with guidance and recommendations issued by the Governor’s office.

As you may recall, the Board began to consider revisions to existing producer license rules by initiating a formal rule inquiry on December 18, 2019. The Pre-proposal Statement of Inquiry filed by the Liquor and Cannabis Board may be found here.

The Board has received requests from medical marijuana patients and segments of the industry to increase the availability of Department of Health (DOH) compliant product in licensed retail stores. The Board has also learned that smaller producers are concerned about business sustainability based on canopy space restrictions. Recognizing this, the Board would like to explore the ways that it can support Tier 1 producer business viability. Revisions considered may also include clarifying and technical updates to existing rule within the scope of this topic.

An agenda is attached to help you prepare. Please come prepared to offer feedback and suggestions regarding this rule section.

If you wish to join us virtually, we’d like to offer the following reminders:

  • Virtual participation will be structured to allow one speaker at a time though the hand-raising feature on WebEx.
  • If you experience difficulty with audio or visual elements of virtual participation, please be patient.

Please remember that we are still in the developmental phase of rule-making, and there are not yet any proposed or final rules amendments. To help you prepare for this listen/learn/contribute forum, please review the guidance document prepared for this and future forums.

Questions? Contact Casey Schaufler at casey.schaufler@lcb.wa.gov

To join the WebEx meeting online:

https://watech.webex.com/watech/onstage/g.php?MTID=e1886460dce4a796b28a08402e1a194b6

To join the WebEx meeting via audio conference only:

Toll Free: 1-855-929-3239
Access Code: 133 082 7909

OLCC Commission Approves Marijuana Licensee Stipulated Settlements

OREGON: At its regular monthly meeting on May 28, 2020, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission approved four marijuana violation stipulated settlement agreements:

MANA FARMS * will pay a fine of $2,640 OR serve a 16-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for two violations.

Licensee is: Mana Holdings, LLC; Gordon Massie, Member; WWM, LLC, Member; Morgan Whitford, Member; Shadow Ray Unltd, LLC, Member; Reuben Ray, Manager/Member; Joint Holdings, LLC, Member; Sean Carriger, Manager/Member.

TKO RESERVES* will pay a fine of $4,950 AND serve a 69 day recreational marijuana producer license suspension, OR pay a fine of $9,900 for two violations.

Licensees are: TKO Holdings, Inc.; Charlie Cassidy, Pres/Dir/Stkhldr; Joanne Beckett, Secretary; Tracy Bouchard, Treas/Dir/Stkhldr; Bruce Beckett, Director/Stkhldr.

TAP RELOOP* will pay a fine of $6,105 OR serve a 37-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for two violations.

Licensees are: Tap-ReLoop, LLC, Co-Licensee; High Spirit Acres, LLC, Co-Licensee; Patrick Pooler, Member.

AJ’S NIRVANA FARM* will surrender its recreational marijuana producer licenseAND each licensee agrees to accept a letter of reprimand for two violations.

Licensees are: AJ’s Nirvana Farm, LLC; Michael Petrin, Member.

NECTAR in Portland will pay a fine of $3,465 OR serve a 21-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension for one violation.

Licensees are:  Nectar Markets, LLC; Nectar Holdings, Inc., Member; Jeremy Pratt, Pres/Dir/Stkhldr; Jeffrey Johnson, Vice President; Michael Olson, Sec/Treas.

NECTAR* will either serve a 79-day suspension OR pay a fine of $11,880 AND serve a seven-day recreational marijuana wholesaler license suspension for eight violations.

Licensees are:  Nectar Markets, LLC; Nectar Holdings, Inc., Member; Jeremy Pratt, Pres/Dir/Stkhldr; Jeffrey Johnson, Vice President; Michael Olson, Sec/Treas.

NECTAR/APPLEGATE VALLEY (AVO) (#A0F3)* will either pay a fine of $4,950 OR serve a 30-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for three violations.

Licensees are:  Applegate Valley Organics, LLC; Nectar Holdings, Inc., Managing Member; Jeremy Pratt, Pres/Dir/Stkhldr; Jeffrey Johnson, Vice President; Michael Olson, Sec/Treas.

NECTAR/APPLEGATE VALLEY (AVO) (#E7E2)* will either pay a fine of $8,250 OR serve a 50-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for five violations.

Licensees are:  Applegate Valley Organics, LLC; Nectar Holdings, Inc., Managing Member; Jeremy Pratt, Pres/Dir/Stkhldr; Jeffrey Johnson, Vice President; Michael Olson, Sec/Treas.

NECTAR/APPLEGATE VALLEY (AVO) (#7A3E)* will either pay a fine of $4,950 OR serve a 30-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for three violations.

Licensees are:  Applegate Valley Organics, LLC; Nectar Holdings, Inc., Managing Member; Jeremy Pratt, Pres/Dir/Stkhldr; Jeffrey Johnson, Vice President; Michael Olson, Sec/Treas.

NECTAR/APPLEGATE VALLEY (AVO) (#3833)* will either pay a fine of $19,800 OR serve a 120-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for four violations.

Licensees are:  Applegate Valley Organics, LLC; Nectar Holdings, Inc., Managing Member; Jeremy Pratt, Pres/Dir/Stkhldr; Jeffrey Johnson, Vice President; Michael Olson, Sec/Treas.

NECTAR/APPLEGATE VALLEY (AVO) (#8267)* will either pay a fine of $13,200 OR serve an 80-day recreational marijuana producer license suspension for four violations.

Licensees are: Applegate Valley Organics, LLC; Nectar Holdings, Inc., Managing Member; Jeremy Pratt, Pres/Dir/Stkhldr; Jeffrey Johnson, Vice President; Michael Olson, Sec/Treas.

USDA To Present At Oregon Hemp & CBD Connex Conference

OREGON: The HEMP & CBD CONNEX CONFERENCE will take place January 29-30, 2020 at the Portland Expo. 

GROWING HEMP IS NOT THE “FIELD OF DREAMS”
What you need to know before you grow: From seed to harvest to shelf, invest in two days in educating yourself in all aspects of the industry.

When the farm bill passed in December 2018, there were 500 farmers growing 11,000 acres of hemp. We saw a demand for hemp biomass and smokable flower with a limited supply. Biomass was selling for $35-$45 a pound. Fast forward to 2019: this looked like the “Field of Dreams”. Applications increased to 1,900 farmers registered and over 60,000 acres farming hemp. We estimate that over 50% of the crops failed in 2019 for many reasons: lack of planning, bad genetics, and harvest and drying roadblocks. Mother nature brought record rainfall and a hail storm that damaged over 1,000 acres. With any new industry and no limit to how many acres could be grown, farmers planted too many acres, not realizing the massive undertaking and hurdles they would encounter. In 2019, farmers soon realized this was not the “Field of Dreams” with overproduction and prices plummeting to $5-$15 per pound and finding reputable buyers makes for a challenging year.

The Hemp & CBD Connex Conference is a collaboration of the entire hemp supply chain from seed to harvest to products on the shelf. Invest two days in educating yourself in all aspects of the industry. Here is your chance to have one-on-one contact with the pros that will guide you in best practices for your business. Oregon & Washington Department of Agriculture and the USDA will present updated rules and regulations and offer clarity to the confusing, evolving nature of these regulations. The conference will feature hands-on displays and demonstrations, will address roadblocks and offer solutions for best production and profit. Visit the “Farmers, Processors & Buyers Lounge” to consult on selling your biomass. Learn about crop insurance, farmer co-ops, futures contracts and partnering with processors for splits and toll processing.

With 30+ educational seminars and nearly 60 speakers, the CCC 6.0 Hemp + CBD Connex offers educational sessions, providing up-to-date data on Regional and Federal legislation. We are honored that USDA Under Secretary, Greg Ibach has the Chief of the U.S. Domestic Hemp Production Plan for the USDA, Bill Richmond, joining us to review and provide updates on the Interim Hemp Regulations. Ben Thiel, USDA Risk Management Agency Regional Director, will discuss NEW Hemp Crop insurance as well as Whole Farm Revenue Protection. Regionally, both Oregon and Washington will be providing updates via their Departments’ of Agriculture representatives, Sunny Summers and Steve Howe, and via their cannabis programs with Steve Marks and Rick Garza.

Dr. Jeffrey Steiner from the Oregon State University Global Hemp Innovation Center will touch on Hemp Research. Economic analysts Beau Whitney and Chase Hubbard will discuss issues regarding economic impact and global market hemp supply chain that limited the market in 2019, and what it will take to be successful in the future. Additional topics below will be covered by representatives from the likes of Big Sky Scientific, Canopy Growth, CO2 Dynamics, Empower Bodycare, Lazarus Naturals, Strength of Hope and Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm.

The INDUSTRIAL HEMP SHOWCASE will feature displays of the many industrial uses made from hemp-fiber, including hempcrete, biofuel, livestock feed, paper, rope, bioplastics. The is even discussion about Hemp as a replacement for Kevlar. Hemp offers many different uses that can promote a more sustainable world. Hemp products can be recycled, reused and are 100% biodegradable. Proponents of hemp claim that it can help reduce global warming because it takes out large amounts of carbon dioxide per acre, more than most plants.

The CBD MARKETPLACE, a shop within the expo, will offer a wide variety of hemp and CBD products to review and purchase, from health food products, topicals, transdermal patches, edibles, beverages, pet brands and much more. On January 30th, consumers are invited to try products, meet the producers and consult with medical professionals about the benefits of CBD products.

In this 6th year of the conference, we explore the expansion of the Hemp industry highlighting the vast potential of HEMP and CBD products. We are grateful for the many people who donated their time to help others in this industry, including top pros and regulators sharing their insights. We’re proud to offer this conference at an amazing value compared to other higher-priced events. Oregon is at the forefront of establishing a business model that can be shared with other states. We’re focused on fostering the innovators so they can learn, share and help build the industry. The Hemp & CBD Connex Conference is brought to you by the Cannabis Collaborative Conference.

 

Oregon: OLCC Issues Marijuana Product Recall

Winberry Farms Sweet Leaf Blend Pre-rolls Failed Pesticide Test 

Portland, OR — The Oregon Liquor Control Commission is issuing an immediate health and safety advisory due to the identification of potentially unsafe pesticide residue on plant material used in a packaged retail marijuana product.  The product in question was cultivated by licensed marijuana producer Ard Ri and packaged for sale to retailers by licensed wholesaler DYME Distribution.

The affected marijuana flower failed its pesticide test, because it exceeded the acceptable level, known as the “action limit”, for the insecticide Imidacloprid*.  The flower was incorporated into pre-rolled joints marketed under the Winberry Farms Sweet Leaf Blend; the strain name is Trap Star.

The impacted product (see above images) has a Unique Identification (UID) number of 1A4010300022859000015892.

The OLCC has locked down the product in the Cannabis Tracking System (CTS) to prevent further distribution or sale to consumers.  The product was sold through nine OLCC licensed marijuana retailers around Oregon.  DYME distributed approximately 700 units of the contaminated pre-rolls; retailers have pulled the remaining 328 packages from their shelves.

Screenshot 2020-01-17 07.43.34The impacted Winberry Farms Sweet Leaf Products were sold from December 17, 2019 through January 8, 2020 at the following licensed retailers:

  • Spark, 5103 NE Fremont Street, Portland
  • Ancient Remedies, 2350 State Street, Salem
  • Puff Oregon, 47700 NW Sunset Highway, Manning
  • Rogue River Herbal PMC, 510 East Main, Suite C, Rogue River
  • The Joint, 3270 Market Street NE, Salem
  • Stoney Only Clackamas, 10289 SE Highway 212, Clackamas
  • Tsunami Marijuana LLC, 36412 Highway 26, Seaside
  • Track Town Collective, 3675 Franklin Blvd., Eugene
  • Green Room, 2521 NW 9th Street, Corvallis

Initial test results for the source marijuana flower produced by Ard Ri was entered into CTS by PREE Laboratories in Corvallis on December 4, 2019; the test results indicated that both test samples failed.  PREE re-analyzed one of the samples, as allowed under marijuana testing rules, on December 11, 2019 and the sample passed.  However marijuana testing rules then require a second lab to re-sample and re-test the original product That verification test never took place.

Because of PREE Laboratories’ incorrect entry of test results into CTS the tracking system designated the marijuana flower as having passed its pesticide test.  Subsequently DYME Distribution packaged and distributed the contaminated marijuana as pre-rolled joints.

The OLCC detected the discrepancy January 6, 2020 when conducting a monthly audit on products that have failed pesticide tests at the point of origin – in this case the marijuana flower.  When the OLCC initiates an administrative hold of a product it automatically puts a hold on any product produced from the original flower.

OLCC is investigating both the contamination test failure, and the licensees’ use of CTS.

Consumers who have these recalled products should dispose of the products or return them to the retailer where they were purchased.  Consumers can follow these instructions found on the OLCC Recreational Marijuana Program website to destroy marijuana on their own.

There have been no reports of illness. The possible health impact of consuming marijuana products with unapproved pesticide residues is unknown. Short and long-term health impacts may exist depending on the specific product, duration, frequency, level of exposure, and route of exposure. Consumers with concerns about their personal health should contact their physician with related questions. Consumers with questions or concerns about recalled product or pesticide residues in marijuana products are encouraged to contact the product retailer and/or the Oregon Poison Center at 800-222-1222.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture maintains a guide list for Pesticides and Cannabis that be found here.

*The Oregon Health Authority is responsible for establishing pesticide and solvent action levels for marijuana testing.