Ohio Board Of Pharmacy Publishes Updated Patient & Caregiver Numbers For June 2020

OHIO: The State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy today published updated patient & caregiver numbers for June 2020. These numbers include:

  • 147,245 Recommendations
  • 116,497 Registered patients
    • 8,349 Patients with Veteran Status
    • 8,713 Patients with Indigent Status
    • 644 Patients with a Terminal Diagnosis
  • 91,330 Unique patients who purchased medical marijuana (as reported to OARRS by licensed dispensaries)
  • 13,140 Registered Caregivers

For the full list of program numbers, please visit the Program Update page.

OLCC Marijuana Advisory Committee Meeting Is Thursday July 9, 2020

OREGON: The next OLCC Marijuana Advisory Committee Meeting will take place Thursday, July 9, 2020

Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, we are holding our meetings virtually. An audio recording of the meeting will be posted on our website.

You can listen live using your phone: 1 (872) 240-3311 Access Code: 786-241-877

 

Pritzker Administration Announces Fourth Month Sales Totals For Illinois Adult Use Cannabis

State’s new adult-use cannabis industry generated more than $37 million in sales in April

ILLINOIS: The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation has announced preliminary numbers show statewide adult-use cannabis sales in April totaled $37,260,497.89. Dispensaries across the state sold 818,954 items over the 30-day period. Sales to Illinois residents totaled $29,735,650.41, while sales to out-of-state residents totaled $7,524,847.47. These figures do not include taxes collected. A portion of every cannabis sale will be reinvested in communities harmed most by the failed war on drugs.

Medical and adult use cannabis dispensaries remain open as part of the essential businesses and operations named in Governor Pritzker’s executive order signed on March 20, 2020. Both sides of the cannabis industry were included to ensure the cannabis supplier industry protects medical cannabis patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, the revenue generated by adultuse cannabis sales funds the important social justice and equity goals at the core of Illinois’ adult-use law.

“Our top priority is to ensure consumers are safe when they go to a dispensary to purchase cannabis,” said Toi Hutchinson, Senior Advisor for Cannabis Control to Gov. Pritzker. “The steps we’ve taken to increase social distancing at dispensaries are accomplishing that, while also enabling this new industry to continue to grow. As such, curbside pickup will remain an option for medical cannabis users to obtain the product they need through May 30.”

Dispensaries are permitted to sell medical cannabis outside of their limited access area on their property or on a public walkway or curb adjacent to the dispensary. Medical cannabis patients will be able to continue to utilize their designated caregiver to purchase medicine for them. However, dispensaries may not deliver medical cannabis to a patient or caregiver’s home. These rules do not apply to adult-use cannabis sales; those must still take place inside the limited access area. A complete list of the rules extended may be found here.

Oregon Delivery, Curbside Pickup Rules Eased To Help During COVID-19 Crisis

Applications Prioritized, Temporary Action Eases Delivery Requirements

OREGON: The Oregon Liquor Control Commission took action designed to ease the economic hardship faced by the hospitality industry as result of public health mandates to help stop the spread of the novel infectious coronavirus (COVID-19).  The Commission’s action relaxes some of the requirements relating to delivery of malt beverages, wine and cider by licensees who qualify for same-day delivery.

At its monthly meeting today the Commission approved emergency rules to enable licensees that currently have an Off-Premises license – or a license that includes Off-Premises Sales Privileges with Same-Day Delivery approval to make delivery of malt beverages, wine and cider to customers at curbside. Home delivery was already permissible, but with the Commission’s action today, the hours for same-day delivery of alcohol have been extended to 2:30 a.m.

Separately, Commission staff have created a streamlined application process for existing Limited On-Premises Sales and Full On-Premises Sales Licensees (restaurants & bars) to start selling malt beverages, wine and cider to go. Qualified licensees can apply for a “90-day Authority To Operate” (ATO) with an Off-Premises Sales license.

“We are looking to help our licensees – economically helping them get every dollar they can, but also administratively by giving them the tools they need,” said Steve Marks, OLCC Executive Director. “These are difficult times for all our industries, and we are looking across our licensee types to do what we can do to help business.”

Curbside delivery includes delivery to a location that is within 100 feet of the boundary of the licensed premises. Licensees can utilize e-commerce operators (beverage & food-delivery app couriers) for delivery provided that the e-commerce providers and the licensees comply with amended delivery rules and the temporary policy which can be located here OAR 845-006-0392 and OAR 845-006-0396.

Licensees seeking to apply for a 90-day ATO with an Off-Premises Sales license can begin the process online here. Statewide there are approximately 5500 eligible licensees for this license; the processing time for each application will vary and a timeframe for granting the ATO cannot be specified.

The Governor of Oregon declared an emergency under ORS 401.165 due to the public health threat posed by the novel infectious coronavirus (COVID-19). The Governor has ordered that immediate implementation of social distancing and community mitigation measures necessary to slow the spread of COVID-19. The Governor’s March 17, 2020 Executive Order 20-07 further prohibits on-site consumption of food and drink at restaurants, bars, and similar establishments.   The penalty for failure to comply includes immediate suspension of the license of the licensed premises.

Licensees that have general questions about their license should contact Licensing Services at olcc.liquorlicenseapplication@oregon.gov.

Click here for the COVID-19 Temporary Changes: Off-Premises Sales & Delivery Fact Sheet

Colorado Legal Cannabis By The Numbers 2/2020

COLORADO: Just how big is Colorado’s legal cannabis business?  Here are the official MED numbers, as of February, 2020.

2020 colorado cannabis nos

 

Medical Marijuana Business License Numbers:

  • 435 Centers
  • 462 Cultivations
  • 216 Infused Product Manufacturers
  • 11 Testing Facilities
  • 7 Operators
  • 7 Transporters
  • 1 Research and Development and Research Cultivation

 Retail Marijuana Businesses License Numbers:

  • 575 Stores
  • 680 Cultivations
  • 282 Product Manufacturers
  • 13 Testing Facilities
  •  9 Operators
  • 10 Transporters

Individual Licensees:

  • 1,712 Owners Licensees
  • 40,168 Employee Licensees

 

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program Mandatory Product Recall

Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program

OHIO: The Ohio Medical Marijuana Control Program (MMCP) is issuing a patient communication to alert patients about a mandatory product recall. This recall is being initiated by the MMCP due to product development using a non-compliant process.

AFFECTED PRODUCT:

Product Name: Pineapple Express Rosin

Purchase Dates: Any purchase date

Processor Name: One Orijin

Product ID:
M00000038808: Sol Vap 62.3 – 12.6 – 5
M00000039812: Sol Vap 59.8 – 0.025 – 5
M00000036317: Sol Vap 45.85 – 47.44 – 10
M00000036932: Sol Vap 48.79 – 50.59 – 10
M00000037232: Sol Vap 68.8 – 0.18 – 5
M00000038319: Sol Vap 40.7 – 46.8 – 10

No reports of adverse reactions for this product have been reported to the MMCP at this time.

Patients who have purchased the recalled product should stop using it. All unused product should be returned to the dispensary where purchased. Returned products will not count toward a patient’s 90-day possession limit. For more information on returns, please contact the dispensary where the product was purchased.

Anyone who thinks that they may be experiencing serious or life-threatening issues should seek immediate medical attention. Patients are reminded that any adverse reactions should be reported to the MMCP toll-free helpline (1-833-464-6627).

FDA Warning Letters And Test Results For Cannabidiol-Related Products

MJLegal

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Over the past several years, FDA has issued several warning letters to firms that market unapproved new drugs that allegedly contain cannabidiol (CBD).

As part of these actions, FDA has tested the chemical content of cannabinoid compounds in some of the products, and many were found to not contain the levels of CBD they claimed to contain. It is important to note that these products are not approved by FDA for the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of any disease. Consumers should beware purchasing and using any such products.

FDA WARNING LETTTERS

WSLCB Adopts Emergency Rules Following Flavored Vapor Ban

WSLCB

The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (Board) today adopted emergency rules consistent with the directives of Executive Order 19-03, dated September 27, 2019. On October 10, 2019, the Washington State Board of Health followed by issuing emergency rules that prohibited the sale of flavored vapor products by persons licensed under chapter 69.50 or 70.345 RCW.

To carry out the directive established by EO 19-03 and State Board of Health emergency rules, today’s emergency rules require two actions by licensees.

  1. Marijuana licensees must disclose all compounds, including but not limited to ingredients, solvents, additives, preservatives, thickening agents, terpenes and other substances used to produce or added to marijuana concentrates for inhalation or marijuana-infused extracts for inhalation at any point during production and processing, regardless of source and origin.

Because the outbreak of lung disease is occurring now and growing, the immediate adoption of rule requiring disclosure of compounds and other substances added to marijuana concentrates for inhalation or marijuana-infused extracts for inhalation is necessary for the preservation of public health, safety and general welfare by assisting public health officials in isolating the compounds and products that may be connected to the recent outbreak of lung disease.

This disclosure form can be found here. Please follow the instructions within the document and submit to mjdisclosureform@lcb.wa.gov.

  1. Executive Order 19-03 orders and directs the Board to provide consumer warnings by requiring that warning signs regarding the posting of warning signs regarding the health risks of vaping at retailers where vapor products containing THC are sold. The Board worked with the industry representatives and marijuana licensees to develop these warning signs.

This emergency rule requires licensed marijuana retailers to conspicuously post a warning sign provided by the Board regarding the health risks of vapor products where vapor products, as defined by WAC 246-80-010(12), are sold. The sign may be downloaded from the Liquor and Cannabis Board website here.

Note: please note that this sign is different than the sign provided earlier. Today’s Board action aligns all signs within the marijuana and vapor/tobacco marketplaces

This notice can be found at lcb.wa.gov/laws/laws-and-rules.

OHA, OLCC Ban Flavored Vaping Sales, Including Online

MJLegal

OREGON: The Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission today filed temporary rules that put into effect Gov. Kate Brown’s Oct. 4 executive order banning all flavored vaping product sales in the state.

The temporary rules, which will remain in effect for six months starting Oct. 15, prohibit the sale of all flavored vaping products—including online sales—to consumers in Oregon.

The ban covers all tobacco and cannabis (marijuana and hemp) vaping products that contain natural or artificial flavors including, but not limited to, chocolate, coffee, cocoa, menthol, mint, wintergreen, vanilla, honey, coconut, licorice, nuts, fruit, any candy, dessert, alcoholic or non‐alcoholic beverage, herb or spice. Tobacco‐flavored tobacco or nicotine products, as well as marijuana‐flavored marijuana or THC products that use only marijuana‐derived flavorings, including terpenes, are not included in the ban.

Retailers found violating the temporary rules will receive a warning letter and recommendations on coming into compliance. Continued violations could result in civil penalties of up to $500 per day, per violation. In addition, cannabis. In addition, cannabis retailers or processors could face violations up to and including cancellation of their license. Additional components of vaping products could be banned in the future. The Governor’s executive order directs OHA and OLCC to “take immediate action and adopt additional emergency rules” to prohibit any chemical or contaminant found to have caused or contributed to vaping‐associated lung injuries being investigated in Oregon and 48 other states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. There are nine cases of this illness in Oregon, including two deaths. OHA and OLCC officials say the temporary rules filed today are significant steps toward stemming the well‐documented tide of e‐cigarette use and vaping by youth, as well as keeping products that may expose people to unsafe chemicals and other contaminants off store shelves. Among Oregon high school students who use e‐cigarettes exclusively, nearly 90% use flavored e‐cigarette products, OHA found.

And there is strong evidence that e-cigarettes increase youth nicotine addiction and increase the risk that youth will start using combustible tobacco such as cigarettes. “We have been warning Oregonians about the health effects of these products before this current outbreak of serious lung injury added more evidence of the dangers of vaping,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed., health officer and state epidemiologist. “These rules stop the sale of a potentially dangerous product, and they’re part of a comprehensive approach to curbing youth vaping and additional cases of vaping‐associated lung injuries.”

He points to additional directives in the Governor’s executive order that call on OHA and OLCC to develop consumer warnings for THC and non‐THC products; expand easy access to FDA‐approved cessation resources; implement a statewide prevention and education campaign; and submit legislative proposals with long‐ term solutions to reduce public health harms from vaping.

The temporary rules affect not only OLCC recreational marijuana licensed retailers and processors, but also alcohol licensees that sell nicotine vaping products, including retailers that sell beer and wine, bars and taverns, and liquor store agents. The OLCC said the flavor ban is just the latest step in its evolution from focusing on public safety to an agency with an equivalent focus on consumer protection. Through increased review of products sold in the OLCC‐licensed retail market and the development of testing capacity, the OLCC will continue to work to refine consumer product disclosure.

Screenshot 2019-10-11 12.45.42

“This Commission is working very hard to ensure the cannabis industry can grow, thrive and compete in the Oregon marketplace,” said Paul Rosenbaum, chair of the OLCC. “We are doing so with a clear focus on the integrity of the marketplace for businesses, consumers and public safety. However, it is our overwhelming responsibility to protect public health and our consumers from undue risk. This agency’s rapid and nimble action to implement the Governor’s executive order is exactly why regulated cannabis will always be a superior consumer choice over illegal markets.” Additional rules were filed earlier this week. On Wednesday, OHA filed temporary rules that require health care providers to report hospitalizations and deaths due to “vaping‐associated lung injury.” Physicians have long had to report “uncommon illness of potential public health significance,” but the new rules are intended to reduce confusion by specifically naming this new lung illness as reportable by Oregon law to public health agencies. Due to the ongoing investigation of vaping‐associated lung injuries, OHA health officials continue to recommend people stop vaping immediately.

Those experiencing symptoms of the illnesses, such as shortness of breath, cough or chest pain should immediately seek medical attention. Those needing help quitting vaping cannabis and nicotine can take advantage of a variety of cessation services, including the Oregon Quit Line, Truth Initiative, Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Helpline, and SAMHSA’s National Helpline.

OLCC Action on Governor Brown’s Vaping Executive Order

Commission Will Meet to Pass Emergency Temporary Rules

OREGON: The Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) will meet next week to act on the Executive Order on the Vaping Public Health Crisis issued today by Oregon Governor Kate Brown.  The Governor’s order directs the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the OLCC to enact a temporary ban on the sale of flavored vaping products, as well as other sources or additives that public health investigators link to the vaping-related illness.

Governor Brown emphasized protecting Oregonians’ health as the primary focus of her action, by removing possibly unsafe products from the marketplace, discouraging vaping by children and youth, and reducing human exposure to potentially dangerous chemicals.

Brown further encouraged Oregonians to stop using vaping products until more is known about the cause of the respiratory illness.  The Governor also called on the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) to step in to regulate flavored vaping products and additives.

The order directs both agencies to enact a 180-day ban on all flavored vaping products and to develop plans within 90 days to address consumer warnings about the dangers of vaping, vaping product ingredient disclosure, product safety tests of vaping equipment, improved health care provider reporting of vaping lung injuries to OHA, and creating a statewide prevention and education campaign aimed at discouraging the use of vaping products.

The Governor is also asking the agencies to develop proposals for long-term solutions to present to the Legislature during the 2020 legislative session.  Governor Brown will include the OLCC in a Vaping Public Health Workgroup tasked with studying the vaping illness crisis and making recommendations to the legislature.

“We will act quickly on the Governor’s directive to address this growing public health crisis,” said Steve Marks, OLCC Executive Director.  “The OLCC will utilize the real-time findings of public health officials here in Oregon and across the country as they continue their investigation into the cause of the vaping respiratory illness outbreak.  We’ll let scientists guide us as we contemplate taking additional actions with a measured approach.”

The OLCC Commission will act on temporary rules proposing to ban licensed marijuana retailers from selling any cannabinoid (marijuana and hemp) products containing any flavor, including non-marijuana terpenes.  In this interpretation the OLCC does not include terpenes derived from marijuana as a “flavor.”  The temporary rule will also prohibit licensed processors from manufacturing or distributing those same products.

After the Commission acts the OLCC will provide further guidance to licensees about taking inventory of flavored or non-marijuana terpene-containing products, removing them from retail store shelves and setting those items aside.  The OLCC will make compliance checks at licensed processors and retailers to make sure affected product is not being offered for sale.