‘Seed-To-Sale’ Marijuana Tracking System Proposed For Michigan Medical Dispensaries

MICHIGAN:  Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.

House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.

The legislation would complement an ongoing to push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.

The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.

‘Seed-To-Sale’ Marijuana Tracking System Proposed For Michigan Medical Dispensaries

MICHIGAN: Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.

House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.

The legislation would complement an ongoing to push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.

State Panel To Vote On Medical Marijuana For Autism

MICHIGAN:  A state panel is meeting again to consider whether to add extreme forms of autism to the conditions that qualify for medical marijuana in Michigan.

Supporters say oil extracted from marijuana has been effective in controlling severe physical behavior by kids with autism. The Michigan Medical Marijuana Review Panel is meeting Friday.

The group’s recommendation will go to the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, which makes the final decision.

New Marijuana Law Section in Michigan State Bar

MICHIGAN:  Michigan’s medical marijuana law has been called confusing and inconsistent, but a group of attorneys is now working to help people better understand it.

The group recently gained recognition from the State Bar of Michigan, which makes Michigan the second state to have a Marijuana Law Section of the state bar. The other is Colorado, where recreational marijuana is legal. That state has a Cannabis Law Committee.

“This isn’t just going to be a social club. This is going to be a proactive section that’s going to try to get some things done,” Lapeer attorney Bernard Jocuns, who will serve as the new Marijuana Law Section’s chair, told 24 Hour News 8 in a Wednesday phone interview.

Jocuns had to get at least 50 other Michigan attorneys to sign on in order to get approval from the Michigan State Bar Board of Commissioners. He was notified of the approval just days ago.

State Supreme Court Rules For And Against Medical Pot

MICHIGAN:  For the ninth time, the Michigan Supreme Court has weighed in on the state’s medical marijuana law, remanding a pair of cases back to Oakland County Circuit Court to have another hearing on whether two men can claim immunity from prosecution for growing and providing weed to people with medical marijuana cards.

Richard Hartwick and Robert Tuttle were charged in 2011 and 2012, respectively, after police raided their homes and found marijuana and plants. Both men had been certified as medical marijuana users, and Hartwick also was certified as a caregiver, growing and selling marijuana to five other people. Tuttle was charged with selling marijuana to three people, but it was unclear if he was a certified caregiver.

In pre-trial motions, both men claimed they should be immune from prosecution because of their medical marijuana user and caregiver status. And they both wanted to assert such a defense. Oakland County Judges Colleen O’Brien and Michael Warren denied the motions for both men, and their decisions were upheld by the state Court of Appeals when attorneys for the two men appealed the rulings.

The state Supreme Court ruled unanimously today that the Oakland judges must hold hearings on the immunity motion. The high court said that the lower court ruling on what type of information a caregiver needed to have before providing marijuana to a patient — such as proof of the doctor-patient relationship and the nature of the patient’s debilitating condition — isn’t a part of the medical marijuana law.

 

Michigan Medical Marijuana ‘Provisioning Centers Act’ Hijacked And Corrupted

MICHIGAN:

1,500 marijuana plants in a single garden? Armed guards transporting pot brownies from the kitchen to the warehouse? A 16% tax on medical marijuana?

With the release of the latest draft of Michigan’s medical marijuana dispensary bill, HB 4209, sponsor Rep. Michael Callton (R-Nashville) has taken The Provisioning Centers Act in a “drastically different” direction. The flip-flop by Callton has longtime supporters insistent on change and threatening to abandon their support for the four-year old proposal.

Seemingly involved in the major shift in direction: the Michigan Cannabis Development Association (MCDA) and Lansing-area real estate mogul Ron Boji, Commissioner of the Department of Transportation for the State of Michigan serving a term through 2017.

 

$100K Problem: Half Of Marijuana Tickets In Grand Rapids Going Unpaid

MICHIGAN:  Barely half of the people ticketed for marijuana possession are paying their fines.

More than $100,000 in civil infraction fines has gone uncollected since voters decriminalized the drug, according to Grand Rapids District Court data. Several hundred offenders haven’t paid up, prompting the court to consider enforcing non-response to tickets as a misdemeanor crime.

“We are looking at this point in time at some statutory provisions that will allow us to take some additional enforcement,” said Gary Secor, court administrator. “We don’t have any recourse (right now) on these municipal civil infractions for marijuana. If they don’t pay, they don’t pay.”

 

Marijuana Legalization Could Be On 2016 Ballot In Michigan

MICHIGAN:  Two measures to legalize marijuana could appear on the November 2016 state ballot after the Board of State Canvassers approved petition wording Thursday.

At least one and possibly two more measures to legalize marijuana for recreational use could still be on their way to the ballot.

The board on Thursday unanimously approved petition wordings for the Michigan Cannabis Coalition and the Cannabis Law Reform Committee, though board members expressed concern that the petition wording for the Cannabis Law Reform Committee — though apparently meeting legal requirements — was too small and narrowly spaced to make it easily legible for members of the public.

Marijuana Legalization Petitions Approved By Michigan Board

MICHIGAN:  Michigan would legalize the use of marijuana for recreational use under two proposed initiatives for which advocates will soon begin collecting voter signatures.

The Board of State Canvassers approved the form of the petitions on Thursday. Two advocacy groups need about 253,000 valid signatures each to put the bills before the Republican-led Legislature.

The measures would receive statewide votes in November 2016 if lawmakers do not act.

One initiative is being led by traditional marijuana activists. The other has backing from a Republican political operative working on the behalf of anonymous business interests.

Let’s Legalize And Tax Marijuana To Help Pay For Michigan Roads, Schools, Police

MICHIGAN:  It’s no secret that Michigan has a problem finding enough money to invest in critical priorities like roads, education and public safety. The costs of providing a good education to our kids, fixing our roads and providing even basic services to residents continue to climb.

Taxpayers have made it clear in the voting booth that they are skeptical about forking over more of their hard-earned money until they know the Legislature has asked corporations to pay their fair share and looked to alternative options to generate significant revenue. What we need are consistent, permanent revenue solutions that don’t simply raise taxes on middle-class, working families.

That’s why I cosponsored and attended a recent discussion at the Grand Rapids Community Media Center’s Peter Wege Auditorium, featuring Ethan Nadelmann and Maj. Neill Franklin. Nadelmann, founder and executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, is a leading proponent of drug policy reform, while Maj. Franklin, the executive director of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and a 23-year veteran of the Maryland State Police, wants to see ineffective and dangerous drug policy reconsidered.