Michigan Medical Marijuana Registry Card Application Fee Reduced, Other Fees Eliminated

Screenshot 2019-10-30 09.48.41MICHIGAN: The Marijuana Regulatory Agency announced today that new administrative rules for the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act (MMMA) are now in effect. The new rules lowered the registry card application fee by 33 percent while eliminating fees associated with processing updates or replacing marijuana registry cards.

“Our team has worked hard over the last year to streamline the process for Michigan’s medical marijuana cardholders,” said MRA Executive Director Andrew Brisbo. “Not only have we lowered the costs, but we’ve made it significantly easier for patients to apply for – and receive – their registry cards.”

The MMMA was passed by Michigan voters in 2008 and authorizes the medical use of marijuana for qualifying patients and provides for the issuance of registry identification cards to qualifying patients and their caregivers, if applicable.

Highlights of the new changes are as follows:

  • The patient application fee (for a two-year card) has been reduced from $60.00 to $40.00.
  • The $25.00 caregiver criminal background check processing fee has been eliminated.
  • The $10.00 fee has been eliminated for the following services:
    •  Update the name or address on a registry card
    • Add or remove a caregiver
    • Request a replacement card
  • The renewal period for patients has increased from 60 to 90 days.
  • A provision is now in effect that authorizes patients to change the person designated to be in possession of the plants.
  • Email is now included as a method by which the Michigan Medical Marijuana Program (MMMP) may contact a patient, caregiver, or physician.

The new rule changes come shortly after the MRA expanded the MMMP online processes to allow marijuana patients in Michigan who apply for their marijuana registry card online to use their approval email as a temporary substitute for a valid registry card in order to obtain their medication the same day they are approved.

The email that patients receive after an approved online application serves as a temporary substitute for a valid registry card. This approval email is valid until patients receive their card in the mail or for up to 15 days from the date of the approval email.

As a result, patients do not have to wait to receive their registry cards in the mail and will be able to purchase or obtain medication the same day they are approved. A valid driver’s license or government-issued identification card with a photographic image is also required to purchase marijuana.

To utilize this online service please visit www.michigan.gov/mmp and note the following:

  • A patient’s certifying physician must have an online account with the MMMP
  • A patient must register for an online account
  • The patient must submit an online application

If you have questions about the temporary card or about the online application process, please call the Marijuana Regulatory Agency MMMP Division at 517-284-6400.

Michigan: Marijuana Possession Becomes Legal Next Week

MJLegalMICHIGAN: Key provisions of the state’s voter-initiated marijuana measure will take effect next week. Members of the Board of State Canvassers certified the midterm election results on November 26, and Proposition 1: The Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act becomes law on Thursday, December 6.

Provisions specific to the adult possession and cultivation of cannabis will take immediate effect. Those over the age of 21 may legally possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana and/or 15 grams of cannabis concentrates in a private residence. Adults may also legally cultivate up to 12 marijuana plants in private, and possess the harvest (up to ten ounces) of those plants. Public use of cannabis will remain a violation of law.

Under the new law, the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs has up to 12 months to begin accepting applications from those seeking to operate licensed cannabis businesses.

Michigan is the tenth state to regulate the adult use of marijuana, and it is the ninth to do so via voter initiative.

For more information, contact Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at (202) 483-5500 or visit Michigan NORML.

Michigan: Adult Use Legalization Measure Certified For November’s Ballot

MICHIGAN: Election officials have confirmed that proponents of a statewide ballot measure, the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act, have gathered a sufficient number of signatures from registered voters to place it on the electoral ballot this November.

Proponents of the voter-initiated measure, The Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, submitted more than 360,000 signatures in an effort to qualify it for the November 2018 ballot. The initiative permits those over the age of 21 to grow and possess personal use quantities of cannabis and related concentrates, while also licensing activities related to the commercial marijuana production and retail marijuana sales.

According to statewide polling commissioned by Michigan NORML, which is a member of the Coalition, 61 percent of voters say that they intend to vote yes on the measure.

Voters in other states will also be deciding on marijuana-related ballot questions later this year. Oklahomans will decide in June on State Question 788, which permits qualified patients to access and cultivate marijuana for therapeutic purposes. Utah voters are also expected to decide on a narrower medicalization measure in November, though officials have yet to officially certify that measure for the ballot. Proponents of a medical marijuana measure in Missouri have surpassed the number of signatures required to place it on the November ballot, well ahead of the state’s May 6 deadline. In South Dakota, officials have confirmed that proponents of a 2018 medical use initiative failed to gather the necessary number of signatures to qualify for November’s ballot.


For more information, contact Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at (202) 483-5500.

Michigan: Support Grows For Proposed Adult Use Initiative

MICHIGAN: More than six in ten Michigan voters endorse a proposed statewide ballot initiative legalizing the adult use and sale of cannabis.

According to polling data compiled by the EPIC-MRA polling research firm and commissioned by Michigan NORML, 61 percent of voters say that they would vote yes on the measure “if the election were held today.” That percentage is up four percentage points from last year, and is an increase of 11 percent since 2014.

Commenting on the statewide polling, MINORML Board Member Brad Forrester said: “I’m not surprised. These results are the product of Michigan NORML’s effective advocacy for the past several years.”

Michigan NORML is a member of The Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, which is backing the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act. The initiative permits those over the age of 21 to possess and grow personal use quantities of cannabis and related concentrates, while also licensing activities related to the commercial marijuana production and retail marijuana sales.

In November, proponents turned in more than 360,000 signatures in an effort to qualify the measure for the November 2018 ballot. State officials must certify a total of 252,523 valid signatures from registered voters in order to place the initiative on the November 2018 ballot.

Marijuana law reform advocates are continuing to gather signatures for voter-initiated efforts in Missouriand Utah. Proponents of a medical marijuana initiative in South Dakota have turned in their signatures and are awaiting a review by the Secretary of State’s office.

In Oklahoma, voters will decide on June 26 whether or not to approve State Question 788 – a broad-based initiative that permits physicians to recommend medical cannabis to patients at their sole discretion. NORML endorsed State Question 788 in January.


For more information, visit: Michigan NORML or The Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol.

Michigan: Legalization Coalition Turns In 360,000 Signatures To Place Issue On 2018 Ballot

MICHIGAN: Proponents of a voter initiative effort to legalize and regulate the personal use and retail sale of cannabis in Michigan have turned in more than 360,000 signatures in an effort to qualify the measure for the November 2018 ballot. Advocates must possess a total of 252,523 valid signatures from registered voters in order to place the initiative – the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act – on next year’s ballot.

The initiative permits those over the age of 21 to possess and grow personal use quantities of cannabis and related concentrates, while also licensing activities related to the commercial marijuana production and retail marijuana sales.

Proponents of the effort, The Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, include members of the Marijuana Policy Project, the ACLU of Michigan, the Drug Policy Alliance, the National Patients Rights Association, Michigan NORML, MI Legalize, the Michigan Cannabis Coalition, and lawyers from the State Bar of Michigan Marijuana Law Section.

Advocates sought to place a similar measure on the Michigan ballot in 2016. That effort was ultimately turned back when lawmakers imposed and the courts upheld new rules limiting the time frame during which signatures could be collected.

Marijuana law reform advocates are presently gathering signatures for voter-initiated efforts in Missouri and Utah. Proponents of a medical marijuana initiative in South Dakota have turned in their signatures and are awaiting a review by the Secretary of State’s office. A statewide initiative legalizing the use of medical marijuana in Oklahoma has already qualified for the 2018 electoral ballot.


For more information, contact: https://www.regulatemi.org or Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at (202) 483-5500.

MILegalize Extends Deadline For Petition Signatures

MICHIGAN: A Lansing-based group collecting signatures to get a marijuana-legalization question on statewide ballots next year says it’s extending its petition campaign past a previous deadline of Dec. 21 that its leaders had set.

“For a variety of reasons, MILegalize is extending its campaign,”  Lansing attorney Jeffrey Hank, chair of the Michigan Comprehensive Cannabis Law Reform Committee, said this weekend.

“We’re really strong financially,” Hank said.  “We’ve received or have pledged to us more than $500,000.”

Medical Marijuana May Go The Way Of Alcohol In Michigan Senate

MICHIGAN: Michigan would create a tiered system for medical marijuana growers, distributors and retailers under evolving legislation up for a likely vote Tuesday in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, said Monday medical pot bills approved by the House earlier this year will be amended in his committee to prevent an owner from being licensed to operate multiple types of medical marijuana businesses.

The state regulates alcohol in a similar, three-tiered fashion.

Michigan Prosecutors Pressured Lab On Medical Marijuana Results

MICHIGAN: The Michigan State Police Forensic Science Division finds itself embroiled in scandal as newly released emails paint a picture of a crime lab in turmoil over how to classify marijuana. Attorneys and medical marijuana advocates accuse Michigan prosecutors of pressuring the state’s crime lab to falsely classify the origins of THC found in hash oils and marijuana edibles as “origin unknown.”

Prosecutors exploited the ambiguity to charge medical marijuana users for possession of synthetic THC, despite the fact that the personal use of medical marijuana has been legal in Michigan since it was approved by voters in 2008. Under Michigan law, possession of synthetic THC constitutes a felony, whereas possession of marijuana and its derivatives by someone who is not a licensed medical marijuana user is a misdemeanor.

The emails were obtained by Michael Komorn, lead lawyer for Max Lorincz, a medical marijuana patient who lost custody of his child and now faces felony charges after the lab’s misleading classification of hash oil found in his home.

“I’d never seen a lab report reporting origin unknown,” Komorn told The Intercept. “What was produced for us was the most unbelievable set of documents I’ve ever seen.”

Michigan Marijuana Legalization Advocates See Promise, Peril In Ohio Pot Proposal

MICHIGAN: Michigan groups hoping to legalize marijuana in 2016 are turning their attention to Ohio today, as voters in the Buckeye State decide the fate of a unique pot proposal.

The Responsible Ohio measure would legalize recreational and medical use of the drug but restrict commercial growing to 10 sites controlled by wealthy investors, who would essentially be granted a monopoly or “oligopoly” on the agricultural side of the marijuana industry.

“You want to see legalization, but you don’t want to see it done that way,” said Jeffrey Hank, chairman of the Michigan Comprehensive Cannabis Reform Committee, commonly known as MI Legalize, one of two groups running a petition drive here.

Rules For Marijuana Shops Debated At Detroit Hearing

MICHIGAN: Concerned Detroiters who cringe at the rapid spread of marijuana dispensaries and medical marijuana card-holders who say they rely on the product for treatment packed a public hearing Monday to debate proposed regulations of the city’s medical marijuana industry.

The Detroit City Council is considering a proposal that includes a way to license the city’s approximately 150 medical marijuana shops. The proposal also has zoning restrictions on how close they can operate near schools, churches and other dispensaries.

Eunice Gantt, a lifelong Detroiter, said the growing number of marijuana dispensaries hurts the city’s reputation.  “I’m concerned about the fact there’s so many dispensaries here when you look at other cities,” Gantt said. “We are becoming a laughing joke.”