Aurora Cannabis to Acquire Mexico’s Farmacias Magistrales S.A.

First License to Import, Manufacture, Store, and Distribute Medical Cannabis Containing THC in Mexico

CANADA: Aurora Cannabis has announced that the Company has entered into a Letter of Intent to acquire all of the issued and outstanding shares of Farmacias Magistrales, subject to customary due diligence provisions, the completion of definitive agreements, and regulatory and government approval.

As previously announced, Farmacias recently became Mexico’s first and only federally licensed importer to date of raw materials containing THC, gaining the necessary licenses, facilities, and permissions to import raw THC material, and manufacture, store, and distribute medical cannabis products containing over 1% THC. This transaction firmly establishes Aurora’s first-mover advantage in one of the world’s most populous countries, where more than 130 million people will have federally legal access to a range of Aurora’s non-flower medical cannabis products containing THC.

Under the regulations governing the Mexican medical cannabis market, domestic cultivation, import or sale in Mexico of dried flower products is prohibited. Consequently, Farmacias is the only company to date with the ability to supply THC containing products, and the only THC-containing offerings available initially will be Aurora-sourced higher-margin derivative products.

Mexico: Supreme Court Strikes Down Marijuana Ban

MJLegal is published by the MJBA.

MEXICO: Justices for Mexico’s Supreme Court have ruled that laws criminalizing the private use and cultivation of cannabis by adults are unconstitutional. Justices opined, “The effects caused by marijuana do not create an absolute prohibition on its consumption.”

In accordance with the ruling, lawmakers may enact regulatory policies governing adults’ personal marijuana use, but they must repeal those laws that broadly prohibit marijuana use per se. By contrast, neither commercial marijuana production or sales are addressed by the Court’s ruling.

In September, South Africa’s highest court similarly struck down laws criminalizing the personal, private consumption of cannabis by adults.

Mexican lawmakers in 2009 decriminalized the possession of small amounts of cannabis (5 grams or less) and other substances. Last month, Canada began licensing the retail production and sale of cannabis to those 18 years and older.


For more information, contact Erik Altieri, NORML Executive Director, at (202) 483-5500.

 

Analysts Forecast High Growth For North America Cannabis

IRELAND: The legal Cannabis revolution is only beginning. The 80+ years prohibition against its use is now ending and the tides are clearly turning. Despite being illegal for so long, more than 37 million people in the U.S. and millions more in Canada use Cannabis, both legally and illicitly.

The market for Cannabis in North America already is large and growing quickly. In 2018, more than $41 billion will be sold and by 2026 that figure will rise to $95 billion according to a new report, “North America Cannabis: New Markets, Competitors and Opportunities: 2018-2026 Analysis and Forecasts.

Authors state the Cannabis revolution offers new hope for many medical problems, a substitute for alcohol and tobacco, and unrivaled investment opportunities for individuals and companies wanting participation in this emerging market.

This report is focused on the U.S. and Canada (North America) markets for Cannabis, both legal and illicit. Specifically, this report covers:

  • North America Cannabis industry including market size and growth, price trends and competitive environment including the black market.
  • United States Cannabis market size and growth, regulation issues, market drivers, transition from illicit to legal, prices, user base, incidence of use, tax incentives, legal risks, financing issues, state metrics and characteristics, branding, derivative products, threats/opportunities to other industries.
  • Canada Cannabis industry including market size and growth, country metrics, regulation issues, comparisons with Colorado and California, black market, prices, market potential, production capacity, supply concerns, opportunities beyond cultivation, competitive environment.
  • Selected company profiles detailing product offerings, brands, facilities, operations, sales, distribution, prices, JVs, exports, expansion plans, yields, costs, patients, M&A activity, competitive advantages, strategies.

For more information about this report visit 

 

‘Grandma’s Magic Remedy:’ Mexico’s Medical Marijuana Secret

MEXICO: When her legs ache, this Mexican grandmother rubs them with marijuana-infused alcohol. She is well aware the homemade remedy defies the country’s cannabis ban, but her family has used the concoction to treat ailments since she was a child, handing it down the generations.

“I really have a lot of faith in it,” said the slender 53-year-old, a housewife and amateur dancer who spoke to AFP about her cannabis use on condition of strict anonymity.

“When I’m very tired, I spread it on my legs, feet and body. It’s really good. I can go without salt but not without marijuana with alcohol. My grandmother used it,” she said, holding a plastic bottle filled with the leaves and liquid.

In turn, she used the family remedy to care for her three children, and three grandchildren. For the kids, a piece of cotton soaked in the liquid is placed in the bellybutton to fight fevers. When they’re congested, the alcohol is rubbed on the chest and back.

A debate on whether to legalize marijuana for recreational or medicinal uses in Mexico is in its infant stages, but Mexicans have used cannabis for therapeutic purposes for centuries.

 

Mexico Issues First Permits For Growing And Possessing Marijuana

MEXICO: The Mexican government granted the first permits allowing growing and possession of marijuana for personal use on Friday.

The government’s medical protection agency said the permits will apply only to the four plaintiffs who won a November Supreme Court ruling.

The permits won’t allow smoking marijuana in the presence of children or anyone who hasn’t given consent.

The permits also don’t allow the sale or distribution of the drug.

The court’s ruling doesn’t imply a general legalization. But if the court rules the same way on five similar petitions, it would then establish the precedent to change the law and allow general recreational use.

Ruling In Mexico Sets Into Motion Legal Marijuana

MEXICO: The Mexican Supreme Court opened the door to legalizing marijuana on Wednesday, delivering a pointed challenge to the nation’s strict substance abuse laws and adding its weight to the growing debate in Latin America over the costs and consequences of the war against drugs.

The vote by the court’s criminal chamber declared that individuals should have the right to grow and distribute marijuana for their personal use. While the ruling does not strike down current drug laws, it lays the groundwork for a wave of legal actions that could ultimately rewrite them, proponents of legalization say.

The decision reflects a changing dynamic in Mexico, where for decades the American-backed antidrug campaign has produced much upheaval but few lasting victories. Today, the flow of drugs to the United States continues, along with the political corruption it fuels in Mexico. The country, dispirited by the ceaseless campaign against traffickers, remains engulfed in violence.

Homegrown, Gourmet Pot On The Rise In Mexico

MEXICO:  Once upon a time, Mexican marijuana was the gold standard for U.S. pot smokers. But in the new world of legal markets and gourmet weed, aficionados here are looking to the United States and Europe for the good stuff.

Instead of Acapulco Gold, Mexican smokers want strains like Liberty Haze and Moby Dick — either importing high-potency boutique pot from the United States, or growing it here in secret gardens that use techniques perfected abroad.

It’s a small but growing market in a country where marijuana is largely illegal, unlike the U.S. states of Colorado and Washington that have legalized recreational use, and others where medicinal pot is available.

A text message will bring a Mexico City dealer to the customer’s doorstep with a menu of high-end buds for sale at the swipe of a credit card through a smartphone reader. Hydroponic shops have sprung up that supply equipment to those who want to cultivate potent strains in sophisticated home-grown operations. Some even are setting up pot cooperatives to share costs like high electrical bills and swap what they grow with each other.

Bill Clinton Apologizes To Mexico For War On Drugs

MEXICO:  Former President Bill Clinton apologized to Mexico during a speech there last week for a backfired U.S. war on drugs that has fueled spiraling violence.

“I wish you had no narco-trafficking, but it’s not really your fault,” Clinton told an audience of students and business leaders at the recent Laureate Summit on Youth and Productivity. “Basically, we did too good of a job of taking the transportation out of the air and water, and so we ran it over land.

“I apologize for that,” Clinton said.

Clinton was referring to U.S. drug enforcement policy that began under his predecessors, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, who invested heavily in shutting down the Caribbean Sea as the favored trafficking route between the U.S. and South America and Central America. That effort pushed smuggling west, over land in Mexico.

Losing Marijuana Business, Mexican Cartels Push Heroin And Meth

CALIFORNIA:  Mexican traffickers are sending a flood of cheap heroin and methamphetamine across the U.S. border, the latest drug seizure statistics show, in a new sign that America’s marijuana decriminalization trend is upending the North American narcotics trade.

The amount of cannabis seized by U.S. federal, state and local officers along the boundary with Mexico has fallen 37 percent since 2011, a period during which American marijuana consumers have increasingly turned to the more potent, higher-grade domestic varieties cultivated under legal and quasi-legal protections in more than two dozen U.S. states.

Made-in-the-USA marijuana is quickly displacing the cheap, seedy, hard-packed version harvested by the bushel in Mexico’s Sierra Madre mountains. That has prompted Mexican drug farmers to plant more opium poppies, and the sticky brown and black “tar” heroin they produce is channeled by traffickers into the U.S. communities hit hardest by prescription painkiller abuse, off­ering addicts a $10 alternative to $80-a-pill oxycodone.

Mexican President Hints To Change In Marijuana Laws

MEXICO:  Mexico and the United States cannot pursue diverging policies on marijuana legalization, Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto was quoted as saying on Sunday, hinting he may be open to following the lead taken by some U.S. states in changing drug laws.

Political pressure has grown in Mexico to take a more liberal stance on marijuana since Washington and Colorado decided to legalize possession and sale of the drug for recreational use in 2012. Other U.S. states plan votes soon.

Marijuana, along with contraband like cocaine and crystal meth, has been a major source of income for violent drug cartels responsible for thousands of deaths in Mexico in recent years.

Proponents of reform say legalizing marijuana would both reduce the gangs’ economic power and help generate more tax revenue.

Pena Nieto says he is in favor of debating the issue despite personal misgivings about legalizing cannabis, and lawmakers say Mexico cannot be out of step for ever with the United States, the principal buyer of illicit drugs that cross the border.