Colorado’s MedPharm Clears Significant DEA Hurdle For Federal Cannabis Research License

COLORADO: MedPharm Research, the leader in cannabis research and formulation development, was notified by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) that it had been selected to move forward as one of the first applicants to be granted a license to grow federally legal cannabis under the terms of a new policy statement issued today in the Federal Register.

“This is something we have been waiting for since we first sent in our application in September, 2016, as one of the first medical grow facilities to apply for a license,” Albert Gutierrez, CEO of MedPharm, said. “Now, finally, the DEA has seen the importance of allowing federally legal grows to get more active in medical cannabis research, and do the work that we really need to do for patients across the country. It is a real game-changer for the whole medical cannabis industry.”

In a letter to Gutierrez, the DEA stated that MedPharm will be issued a Notice of Proposed Rule-making, where the company will be asked to comment on regulations about growing cannabis for medical research. However, the DEA has not provided a timetable for when those regulations will be completed. “We at MedPharm stand ready to assist the DEA in any way we can to help expedite this process, and bring to patients the best quality, FDA-approved cannabis that they need for research and treatment as quickly as possible,” said Gutierrez.

According to the University of Mississippi News, in 1968, the Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy was awarded a competitive contract from the government to grow marijuana that could be standardized for research. For over 50 years, it has remained the only cultivation facility licensed by the DEA to provide federally legal cannabis for medical researchers, who have reported that cannabis from the university is of such poor quality that it is essentially useless in conducting the lab work and human trials necessary for a reliable FDA-approved medical research.

As more medical cannabis research ramped up, a growing group of medical cannabis researchers pressured the DEA to open up licensing to other facilities. Then, in August, 2016, the DEA stated that they would begin accepting applications for companies wanting licenses for legal grows, but nothing more happened until this June, when one of the applicants sued the DEA for unreasonable delays, prompting today’s response.

MedPharm is well-positioned to work with the DEA and be among the first providers of federally legal cannabis for medical research. The application for the license included outlining research objectives and creating areas where medical research cannabis is grown specifically for research purposes.

MedPharm Awarded Colorado’s First Cannabis Research License

COLORADO:  MedPharm, a leading medical cannabis grow, R&D laboratory and compounding facility, announced today that it has been awarded the first cannabis research license by the state of Colorado. To get the license, the state looked at the applicant’s capabilities to successfully develop and conduct research.

The cannabis research license was created by the state to allow cannabis-related operators and researchers to study the plant and better understand what it offers. The application for the license included outlining research objectives and creating areas where medical research cannabis is grown specifically for research purposes.

“We have a strong research team of some of the best and brightest in the industry, and this cannabis research license will really help us in our quest to be a world leader in dosage formulation and product development,” Albert Gutierrez, CEO of MedPharm, says. “We are eager to look at what benefits the plant might offer for improving the human condition.”

Dr. Tyrell Towle, the director of chemistry for MedPharm with a PhD in medicinal and natural products chemistry, says that the cannabis research license will enable MedPharm to provide their high-quality dosage forms directly to study patients. “It will also allow us to perform Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) because we can supply placebos as well, which wasn’t previously allowed for,” he says. “We are now in a better position than any cannabis company to take on research partnerships and we welcome those who are interested in such partnerships.”

MedPharm currently makes three brands: Aliviar, a medically-focused brand that produces pharmaceutical grade dosage forms (www.aliviaralleviates.com); Become products for a mellow, balanced or elevated feeling (www.becomelifestyle.com); and Batch, an oil concentrate with higher percentages of THC for the cannabis connoisseur (www.batchextracts.com). “Our recent review of our strains shows a very rare and unique cannabinoid that we originally dismissed as interference. We were able to identify the cannabinoid and see its molecular structure, which is exciting,” Towle says.