Ohio Board Of Pharmacy Awards Second Dispensary Certificate Of Operation In Columbus

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OHIO: The State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy today awarded a Dispensary Certificate of Operation to Bloom Medicinals, LLC, located at 1361 Georgesville Rd., Columbus.

For a list of all Dispensary Certificates of Operation, please click here.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY MAP

Ohio Medical Marijuana Dispensary Map

MedMen Acquires Illinois Dispensary Seven Point; Continues US Expansion

CALIFORNIA:  MedMen Enterprises announced that it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Seven Point, a licensed medical cannabis dispensary located in the historic Chicago suburb of Oak Park, Illinois.

Illinois is one of the fastest growing medical marijuana markets in the country. Since the beginning of the year the number of qualifying patients increased 41 percent to 42,203, and retail cannabis sales grew 35 percent, according to the state. Illinois also expanded its medical cannabis program recently to allow people who have been prescribed opioids the opportunity to obtain temporary medical cannabis cards.

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“This acquisition brings the MedMen brand to yet another major stage,” said MedMen CEO and Co-founder Adam Bierman. “MedMen has established a presence in the primary markets of California, Nevada and New York. Our strategy has been to put our brand in high visibility commercial districts in popular locations like Beverly Hills, Manhattan, Las Vegas, and Oak Park, just outside Chicago, fits the mold perfectly.”

Seven Point is located in a high foot traffic shopping district among popular restaurants, cafes and major retailers like Whole Foods, Gap and Pier 1. This week, MedMen also announced the acquisition of a medical marijuana dispensary in Scottsdale, Arizona, as well as cultivation and processing operations. Currently, MedMen operates dispensaries in three states, including seven in the Los Angeles area and one in Manhattan.

Opinions: Every Medical Marijuana State Should Be Fully Reciprocal

By Sue Vorenberg
Cannabis Daily Record

Traveling with medical marijuana is always a nerve wracking experience, filled with worry that your medicine will be seized or worse – you’ll wind up in jail.

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With any other prescription drug – including highly addictive things like Oxycodone – it’s easy enough to travel to another state and fill your prescription while you’re there.

But since cannabis is federally illegal, the same rules don’t apply.

It can be challenging enough to find a prescribing doctor, because HMOs and other traditional medical organizations forbid them from prescribing a federally illegal substance. But even after you go through the process of tracking one down and getting a prescription, you still can’t get that prescription filled in most other medical marijuana states because only seven of them have reciprocity.

To date, the states that allow medical marijuana card holders from other states to fill prescriptions are: Arizona, Delaware, Maine, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire and Rhode Island.

 

Marijuana Dispensaries Save Lives, New Study Shows

The United States has a problem with painkillers. During the past 15 years, America has seen a tremendous growth in both the sales of prescription opiates and the number of people who die each year from abusing them. More than 16,000 people fatally overdosed on prescription painkillers in 2013, accounting for 60% of all overdose deaths, according to the Center for Disease Control. But a new study suggests that some states have already stumbled onto a means of curbing this fatal epidemic: Easily-accessible marijuana.

For the study, researchers from the RAND Corporation and the University of California-Irvine (UCI) examined whether, in the years following legalization, states that legalized marijuana had experienced reductions in fatal overdoses and addiction treatment center admissions relating to opioid abuse. The researchers found that these states experienced significant reductions in both measures of opioid misuse — but only if they had also legalized marijuana dispensaries.

In the six states where doctors are allowed to prescribe marijuana, but where retail dispensaries are prohibited, the study found “no evidence” of “reductions in substance abuse or mortality.” But in those 18 states where medical marijuana shops are allowed, they found a 16% reduction in “opioid-related mortality” and 28% reduction in opioid-abuse treatment admissions.

Critics of marijuana dispensaries often accuse them of fostering an environment of de facto legalization. In some states, once a doctor provides a qualifying card, the patient can purchase marijuana virtually at will. As Vox’s German Lopez writes, “Just about anyone can go to Venice Beach in Los Angeles, pay around $40 for a card, and legally buy and smoke a joint within five minutes.”

 

San Diego Greenlights First Legal Medical Marijuana Dispensary

CALIFORNIA:  An appeal of a conditional use permit granted to a San Diego State University business professor to operate a medical marijuana dispensary in Otay Mesa was unanimously denied by the city’s Planning Commission today.

In October, a city hearing officer granted a conditional use permit to David Blair to open A Green Alternative in a 1,400-square-foot space in a strip mall at 2335 Roll Drive, near the Brown Field airport. It was the first permit for a legal dispensary to be granted by the city.

The hearing officer’s ruling was appealed by Barbara Gordon, a North County drug prevention specialist.

Blair applied for the permit under rules established by the City Council earlier this year. The regulations require prospective dispensary owners to go through a lengthy permit application process, and also specify zoning and distances to keep the operations away from residences, schools, churches and the like.

Alaska Cannabis Club Plans To Open Medical Marijuana Dispensary On Legalization Day

ALASKA: Following an eviction from its clubhouse at the former Kodiak Bar in downtown Anchorage, the Alaska Cannabis Club is moving forward with plans to open a medical marijuana dispensary on Feb. 24, the day recreational marijuana becomes legalized in Alaska.

Come Feb. 24, “this is the place to get your weed,” said club owner Charlo Greene, whose legal name is Charlene Egbe. Greene gained notoriety after quitting her job as a reporter on-air and revealing herself as the owner of the cannabis club.

But regulators warned that the club’s business plans are dangerous.

The club moved back to its original location on Gambell Street in downtown Anchorage in mid-January, after being evicted from its clubhouse due to lack of insurance.

Marijuana Licensing Went Awry Early On, Records Show

MASSACHUSETTS:  A contractor hired by the state health department to rank companies hoping to open medical marijuana dispensaries acknowledged in internal e-mails that it simply ran out of time to conduct thorough checks of some applications. Still, the health department extended the company’s contract and more than doubled its pay, records show.

A different contractor was awarded a lucrative no-bid deal to conduct in-depth background checks yet failed to detect that a couple hired by several applicants to run proposed dispensaries had lost their own marijuana business license in Colorado because of violations.

These latest revelations open a wider window onto the state’s troubled effort to grant licenses for medical marijuana dispensaries, a process so flawed that regulators spent five months untangling the mess.

A Globe review shows that the state’s licensing process went off the tracks nearly from the beginning, hobbled by too little time, too many conflicts of interest, and questionable work from highly paid contractors.

 

Oregon Medical Pot Dispensary Vows To Stay Open

OREGON:   Cheryl Keil said marijuana saved her husband Jesse’s life, after a stroke 15 years ago left him partially paralyzed and suffering from depression.

This experience and others motivated Keil andTony Smith of Cave Junction to open a medical marijuana dispensary in August next to theKerby General Store. The name of the dispensary is Mainstreaming Our Medicine.

Framed on the wall, a couple of feet from a bong for smoking pot, is a license approved by the Oregon Health Authority, which manages the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program. They also opened another dispensary, Providing All Patients Access, a month ago in Cave Junction.

Keil and Smith’s dispensaries, and one recently opened in Selma called Sacred Flower, are just three of over 200 licensed by the state of Oregon since a new law allowing such businesses took effect in March. They’re the only ones operating in Josephine County.

 

Medical Marijuana Dispensary Becomes Canada’s First to Accept Bitcoin

CANADA:  Mega Chill has become the first medical marijuana dispensary in Canada to accept bitcoin.

Since the formal announcement this September, Mega Chill has seen an overwhelmingly positive response from the community, both from patients familiar with bitcoin and customers who had never heard of the digital currency.

The relationship between bitcoin and the marijuana industry is long-standing due to bitcoin’s ability to offer an alternative to the traditional banking system and its still-prevalent use in online dark markets.

In the case of Mega Chill, however, the decision had less to do with sidestepping potential money problems and more to do with the growing popularity of bitcoin as a payment method. CoinDesk spoke with co-owner Matt Jung, who cited the public’s curiosity and enthusiasm for digital currency as the reason his business decided to accept bitcoin.

 

Marijuana Dispensary Leads To Small Town Political Showdown

OREGON:  The town of Gold Hill, Oregon is in turmoil. Two-thirds of its City Council is the subject of a recall election on Monday.

What has some of the 1,2000 residents of Gold Hill so riled up? The targeted city leaders had voted to approve a medical marijuana dispensary.

From the outside, Breeze Botanicals doesn’t look like a place that sells pot. There’s a couple of crates of garden veggies out front. Walk inside, and you’re greeted by soothing acoustic music. But there’s one thing that hints of something amiss: A big sign that says “Vote No on the recall.”

Owner Brie Malarkey said she really didn’t want to get into politics when she opened her dispensary a few months ago.