Cannabinoids In Cannabis Help Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

In honor of World Alzheimer’s Month, we’ve asked educator/author Curt Robbins to provide an overview of how the cannabinoids in cannabis can be helpful in treating this mental illness.

By Curt Robbins

Discovered in 1906 by Dr. Alois (Aloysius) Alzheimer, a German psychiatrist and neuropathologist, Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Alzheimer stumbled upon the ailment when performing an autopsy on the brain of a woman who died of a then-unknown mental illness.

Surprisingly, Alzheimer’s disease begins damaging the brain up to a decade prior to the onset of any form of short-term memory loss—the stereotypical first discernible symptom of the disease that leads to a positive diagnosis.

The cannabinoids in cannabis help treat Alzheimer’s disease via a mechanism involving the removal of the excess plaques and tau tangles from the brain. Research indicates that some cannabinoids may transport these damaging plaques through the blood-brain barrier and out of the brain. Consumption of cannabinoids to remove plaque from the brain may result in improvement, but significant progress is strongly dependent on the progress of the disease with respect to how large a portion of the brain has suffered damage.

Formal research, anecdotal evidence, and personal testimonials have revealed that treatment with cannabinoids may slow or even halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. In some cases, memory function may be partially or mostly restored.

Read the entire article here:

Copyright © 2020 by Curt Robbins. All Rights Reserved.

Study: Marijuana Dispensaries Associated With Declining Rates Of Painkiller Abuse

GEORGIA: Cannabis dispensaries are associated with reduced levels of opioid-related treatment admissions and overall drug mortality, according to a study published online on SSRN.com.

A University of Georgia economics professor assessed the relationship between the opening of medical cannabis dispensaries and drug treatment admissions.

Dispensary openings are associated with “a 20 percentage point relative decrease in painkiller treatment over the first two-years of dispensary operations,” the study reported. This correlation was strongest among non-Hispanic white males in their thirties.

Dispensary openings also resulted in fewer drug-related mortalities per 100,000 people.

The author concludes, “[T]he unintended beneficial effects of allowing for marijuana dispensary operations should be considered by policymakers as they aim to curtail narcotic abuse and limit the impact of the opioid epidemic.”

The paper’s findings are similar to prior studies reporting that states permitting medical marijuana dispensaries experience a relative decrease in both opioid abuse and opioid overdose deaths compared to states that do not.


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “The effect of medical marijuana dispensaries on adverse opioid outcomes,” appears online.