New Denver Hotel Allows Marijuana Use

COLORADO:  In LoDo, the Nativ Hotel is set to open. Thursday through Saturday there will be a series of functions to welcome the boutique hotel that allows marijuana use.

“We have something for everyone here at Nativ,” said owner Mike Alexander. “We have door bells on rooms, living plant walls on our outdoor patios where guests can consume marijuana on their stays, the Stereo Lounge in the basement, and original art work throughout the hotel. We even have a coffee bar specializing in CBD infused lattes.”

The rooms have all glass showers, the champagne suites have self-cleaning hot tubs and there is a lunch/happy hours lounge called Pourtions. The cannabis friendly hotel is the first of its kind in Denver. Some of the rooms even have the Monsieur Bartenders … meaning no more mini-bars. This pour system allows for customers to make up to 800 combinations without ever leaving their room.

Impact Of Marijuana On Travel Hard To Assess In Colorado

COLORADO:  A year after marijuana sales became legal in Colorado, the impact on tourism is difficult to assess.

At least 18 companies offer bus tours of marijuana facilities, and a Denver bed and breakfast markets itself as a “bud and breakfast,” the Denver Post reported Sunday.

But state-funded agencies aren’t promoting marijuana tourism, and no statistics are available on its impact.

Colorado Tourism Office Director Al White said promoting pot-oriented travel could put the state in danger of violating laws. Marijuana is still illegal under federal statutes.

Are Marijuana Tours In Colorado Worth Your Time And Money?

COLORADO:  “It was either Vegas or Colorado,” said “Wilma”, a D.C.-area woman, of her 40th birthday vacation plans.

Wilma along with friend “Betty” were in Denver, sans husbands and children, to spend a Saturday on the “One-Day Dispensary and Grow Tour” offered by My 420 Tours. And I was on the tour with them — reviewing the outing for you and other Cannabist readers.

Despite the Colorado Tourism Office’s lack of promotion, marijuana tour companies like My 420 Tours sprouted up alongside adult recreational shops at the beginning of 2014. For $150, the five-hour tour gets participants legally stoned in a private limo and make stops at a head shop, two dispensaries, a downtown restaurant and a marijuana grow.

On this particular Saturday, some guests were vacationing on an all-inclusive Thursday-through-Saturday marijuana tour package that included staying in a vape-friendly downtown hotel room, a cooking-with-cannabis class, a visit to the Denver Botanic Gardens for the Chihuly glass exhibit and the Saturday we are about to experience. Many guests were couples celebrating milestones. According to Jason Green, logistics lead for My 420 Tours, 20 percent of his clients are from Texas and another 10 percent are international visitors.

 

Nevada Cracking Door To Marijuana Tourism

NEVADA:  Starting early next year, tourists with a medical marijuana card from their home state can buy pot while visiting Las Vegas and other Nevada cities.

A handful of other states offer similar reciprocity, including Rhode Island and Maine, but Nevada is the first major tourist-destination state to honor other states’ systems, industry experts say. The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority estimates that nearly 40 million people visit Sin City annually.

“It is a city of recreation, the city that invented the $5,000 bottle of vodka,” said Derek Peterson, CEO of Terra Tech, which has secured eight Nevada dispensary licenses. “It’s the adult playground in the United States. That’s Las Vegas’ model.”

The decision by state lawmakers to let tourists buy pot legally while visiting Nevada further opens the doors to marijuana tourism across the country. Colorado and Washington state already allow anyone to buy small amounts of pot, and at least one study has shown tourism interest in Colorado has skyrocketed since recreational sales began Jan. 1. Alaska and Oregon in the fall election legalized recreational marijuana sales and use, and Washington, D.C., legalized possession.

 

Colorado’s Budding Pot Tourism

COLORADO:  Crested Butte, Colorado’s wildflower capital, nestles in the Elk Mountain Range of west-central Colorado, where lupine, aster, mule’s ear and a host of other dazzlers dot the fields. But currently the hottest tourist attraction is weed.

The resort town, population 1,600, supports four storefront marijuana shops.

The sale of medical marijuana has been legal for 14 years, but since the state sanctioned recreational marijuana for adults in January, the cannabis shop’s stubby green cross insignia has become as recognizable as a striped barber’s pole — and in some towns, more common. Meanwhile, the number of visitors coming to partake has grown like a weed.

Crested Butte — once a silver mining hotbed, now a hub for mountain bike and ski enthusiasts — radiates a laid-back vibe. Free shuttle buses, whimsically decorated by local artists, ferry passengers from the cozy downtown to condos and hotels on the slopes. On Elk Avenue, the main boulevard, a string of 1880s blacksmith shops, dry goods stores and saloons (Butch Cassidy allegedly drank here) have been reborn as trendy pizza parlors, sushi lounges and Patagonia boutiques. The posted speed limit is a leisurely 15 miles an hour. As one pot tourist observed, “If you’re stoned, 15 is fast.”

 

7 Things You Need To Know About Marijuana Tourism

COLORADO:  When you think about green travel, it usually means an eco-friendly resort or destination.

That’s not the case anymore as “green” has taken on a new meaning with the legalization of marijuana in Colorado and Washington–and the corresponding increase in tourism to both states. For the purpose of this story, I’ll focus on Colorado, but many tips cover both states.

Travelers looking for a ski vacation later this year may want to skip Utah or Tahoe, and head to Colorado instead. We are already seeing a direct spike in visitors tied exclusively to the legalization of marijuana, but the lure of legal marijuana could end up increasing tourism to all areas of the state.

Entrepreneurs are actively going after this market by packaging tours around the idea of getting high, but you can just as easily do it on your own. Land in Denver and the information desk will direct you to any one of the numerous outlets where you can legally purchase marijuana and enjoy a hazy break from the ordinary without worry of arrest.

 

Bud-And-Breakfast: Marijuana Tourism In Colorado

COLORADO:  Crested Butte, Colorado’s wildflower capital, nestles in the Elk Mountain Range of west-central Colorado, where lupine, aster, mule’s ear and a host of other blooms dot the fields. But currently the hottest tourist attraction is weed.

The resort town, population 1,600, supports four storefront marijuana shops.

The sale of medical marijuana has been legal for 14 years, but since the state sanctioned recreational marijuana for adults in January, the cannabis shop’s stubby green cross insignia has become as recognizable as a striped barber’s pole – and in some towns, more common. Meanwhile, the number of visitors coming to partake has grown like a weed.

Crested Butte – once a silver mining hotbed, now a hub for mountain bike and ski enthusiasts – radiates a laid-back vibe. Free shuttle buses, whimsically decorated by local artists, ferry passengers from the cozy downtown to condos and hotels on the slopes. On Elk Avenue, the main boulevard, a string of 1880s blacksmith shops, dry goods stores and saloons (Butch Cassidy allegedly drank here) have been reborn as trendy pizza parlors, sushi lounges and Patagonia boutiques. The posted speed limit is a leisurely 15 miles an hour. As one pot tourist observed, “If you’re stoned, 15 is fast.”

 

Marijuana Tourists Sparking Up In Colorado’s Ski Towns

COLORADO:  Tourists are buying up to 90% of the recreational pot sold in some Colorado ski towns, according to a new state analysis that says those visitors are pouring tens of millions of dollars into a marijuana economy that’s far larger than first predicted.

The study prepared for state marijuana regulators says about 9% of Colorado residents are using marijuana at least once a month, and that previous estimates dramatically under counted the amount of marijuana consumed by heavy users. The study, released Wednesday, says 22% of users consume about 70% of the pot sold in Colorado, defining a heavy user as someone consuming a gram or more a day at least 21 days monthly.

The study also says Colorado residents will consume about 121.4 metric tons annually, while tourists will buy nearly 9 metric tons. A study by state tax officials earlier this year estimated the market at just 92 metric tons, and a separate study released last year estimated the market at 64 metric tons.

 

How will Uruguay’s marijuana law work?

URUGUAY — On July 31st the lower house of Uruguay’s congress narrowly voted to legalise the production, sale and consumption of marijuana (cannabis). The bill has passed to the Senate, where it is expected to be approved with a comfortable margin. If it does, it will be signed into law by President José Mujica, who has long backed the proposal. By the end of the month it may be legal to light up a joint while watching the sun set over Punta del Este. [Read more…]