WSDA Releases Updated List Of Pesticides Allowed For Use In Marijuana Production

WASHINGTON: The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has recently updated the list of pesticides that are allowed for use in marijuana production in Washington State, based on criteria previously established by WSDA.

WSDA

The WSDA has added 12 pesticides to the list of allowable products, and has removed 15 pesticides because the registrations for their distribution in Washington were voluntarily cancelled, or because the labels were no longer consistent with WSDA criteria.

In addition, WSDA has added two new columns to the list to designate Section 3 pesticides that are subject to Worker Protection Standard (WPS) requirements, and Section 3 pesticides that are limited to use by non-commercial marijuana growers (e.g., use allowed on home grown marijuana) only.

Please check your stock of pesticides against the list to ensure that you are using an allowed product. Marijuana growers can continue to use any existing stocks of the 15 pesticides that were removed from the list, but no new product can be purchased.

All of the pesticides that were added to the list contain active ingredients that were already allowed for use in marijuana production.

Some pesticides are labeled for application to soil or to crop plants, while some pesticides are labeled for application to both soil and crop plants (e.g., insecticides, fungicides). Other pesticides include herbicides labeled for direct application to, and control of, unwanted plants (i.e., weeds). Remember to read, understand, and comply with all applicable label directions and precautions when using any pesticide.

Added

  1. AVENGER AG OPTIMA, EPA Reg. No. 92967-4
  2. AZAMAX, EPA Reg. No. 71908-1-81268
  3. AZERA GARDENING, EPA Reg. No. 1021-1872
  4. BELCHIM IRONFIST SLUG AND SNAIL BAIT, EPA Reg. No. 67702-32-87865
  5. FIREWORXX, EPA Reg. No. 67702-54-59807
  6. PERAGREEN 15%, EPA Reg. No. 63838-2
  7. ZEROTOL HC, EPA Reg. No. 70299-16
  8. AGROPEST, WA Reg. No. 997700-19001
  9. DELIVERANCE, WA Reg. No. 89943-19002
  10. ECO-1 FRUIT & VEGETABLE SPRAY CONCENTRATE, WA Reg. No. 74578-19001
  11. ECO-1 FRUIT & VEGETABLE SPRAY READY TO USE, WA Reg. No. 74578-19002
  12. MERCENARY, WA Reg. No. 997480-18001

Removed – Voluntary cancellation, or label no longer consistent with WSDA criteria

  1. 1600 X-CLUDE FORMULA 2 MICROENCAPSULATED INSECTICIDE, EPA Reg. No. 499-539
  2. AGRI-FOS SYSTEMIC FUNGICIDE, EPA Reg. No. 71962-1
  3. AVENGER AG BURNDOWN HERBICIDE, EPA Reg. No. 82052-4
  4. AVENGER AG OPTIMA, EPA Reg. No. 82052-4
  5. AZAPRO, EPA Reg. No. 92629-1
  6. BIOSIDE HS 15%, EPA Reg. No. 63838-2
  7. BONIDE BON-NEEM II FUNGICIDE/MITICIDE/INSECTICIDE CONCENTRATE, EPA Reg. No. 70051-75-4
  8. DESECT DIATOMACEOUS EARTH INSECTICIDE, EPA Reg. No. 7655-1
  9. FINALSAN TOTAL VEGETATION KILLER, EPA Reg. No. 67702-8-87865
  10. QUIK-FIRE, EPA Reg. No. 67702-8-17545
  11. MOLE & VOLE STOPPER GRANULAR, WA Reg. No. 82165-12005
  12. PURE 3-WAY, WA Reg. No. 998220-13002
  13. PURE 3-WAY COMMERCIAL, WA Reg. No. 998220-16002
  14. PURE KAPOW, WA Reg. No. 998220-13001
  15. PURE KAPOW COMMERCIAL, WA Reg. No. 998220-16001

You can find the complete list of pesticides that are allowed for use in marijuana production, the criteria WSDA used to establish the list, and information regarding statewide stop-sale orders in Washington on the WSDA web site:

agr.wa.gov/pestfert/pesticides/pesticideuseonmarijuana.aspx

Contact

  • For information regarding the registration of pesticides and fertilizers, please contact the WSDA Pesticide and Fertilizer Registration Section.

          Phone: 360-902-2025

          Email for pesticide registration: pestreg@agr.wa.gov 

Email for fertilizer registration: fertreg@agr.wa.gov

  • For information regarding how to comply with the pesticide label, please contact the WSDA Pesticide Compliance Program.

          Phone: 360-902-2040

          Email: pcompliance@agr.wa.gov

  • For any other questions, please contact your Liquor and Cannabis Board enforcement officer.

California Cannabis Licensing Authorities Announce Changes To Proposed Cannabis Regulations

CALIFORNIA: California’s three state cannabis licensing authorities today announced changes to the proposed cannabis regulations published to the California Regulatory Notice Register on July 13, 2018.

These proposed changes mark the next step in the formal rule-making process toward adopting non-emergency regulations and the beginning of a 15-day public comment period related to the proposed changes. The changes to each licensing authority’s proposed non-emergency regulations and rule-making documents have been posted to California’s Cannabis Portal and may be viewed online.

BCC logo

“We received valuable feedback from industry stakeholders and the public over the duration of the 45-day comment period,” said Bureau of Cannabis Control Chief Lori Ajax. “These changes we’ve proposed further clarify the requirements for cannabis businesses while protecting overall public health and safety.”

PUBLIC COMMENT: There will be a 15-day public comment period on the proposed changes, which starts today and concludes Monday, November 5, 2018, at 5 p.m. Please note that only public comments addressing the newly proposed changes will be considered. The three licensing authorities will review each timely comment received and will respond to all comments in documents filed during the final stages of the rule-making process.

Comments may be submitted in writing to each licensing authority through email or physical mail. No public comments will be accepted by phone. The current emergency regulations, adopted by the Bureau of Cannabis Control, California Department of Public Health and California Department of Food and Agriculture in December 2017 and readopted in June 2018, were originally issued through the emergency rule-making process to meet the legislative mandate to open California’s regulated cannabis market on January 1, 2018.

These emergency regulations will remain in effect until the non-emergency rule-making process is complete.

On June 27, 2017, the legislature passed and Governor Brown signed into law the Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) which provided one regulatory framework for both medicinal and adult-use commercial cannabis activity within the state. The state cannabis authorities adopted emergency regulations in December 2017 for initial implementation of the provisions of MAUCRSA and are now using the regular rule-making process to adopt permanent regulations.

Boulder To Take New Look At Marijuana Regulations

COLORADO: Representatives of the marijuana industry, supported by Boulder City Councilman Macon Cowles, want the city to reconsider its approach to marijuana regulation and come in line with the rest of the state, but top city officials say the more stringent approach has resulted in a safer city while still allowing businesses to be competitive.

Cowles said the city’s regulations may have made sense when legal marijuana first exploded in 2009 and the industry included shady actors with criminal records, but the remaining 77 licensed businesses have shown themselves able and willing to follow exacting rules and shouldn’t have to live with a “zero tolerance” policy for any rule violation and city staff who have the discretion to revoke a license without an administrative review.

“Most people in the industry feel like it isn’t working that well,” Cowles said. “They feel like they’re hanging from a thread that could be cut at any time. Our ordinance says that having a marijuana business is not a property right. It’s a privilege. We say there’s zero tolerance and no administrative review. That makes someone feel pretty insecure, and that’s not fair.”

Alaska Grown: Should All Marijuana Entrepreneurs Be Alaska Residents?

ALASKA:  Marijuana industry advocates are crying foul about a residency clause in Alaska’s draft marijuana regulations that would require all business owners and investors to be Alaska residents.

With the deadline for crafting Alaska marijuana regulations just three months away, the Marijuana Control Board must decide whether the requirement — which board member Brandon Emmett said “basically crushes the American dream” — is the best choice for a fledgling market teeming with risk.

Current draft rules read like this: Anyone who wants a marijuana business license, whether an individual, partnership, limited liability company or corporation, must be an Alaska resident. That includes every corporate shareholder and partner. Only a licensee may have a “direct or indirect financial interest,” and all licensees must be Alaska residents.

Colorado Tightens Marijuana Rules

COLORADO:  Medical and retail marijuana dispensaries will receive about 30 new rules related to almost every aspect of their businesses.

The state Marijuana Enforcement Division, or MED, released the new rules Thursday, Sept. 24. The rules change everything from the startup licensing fees, to rules for cultivation, production, edibles, sales, employee training and product testing. Right down to a hand-washing requirement.

State officials have contended that Colorado’s new recreational marijuana industry is a work in progress, and these new standards underscore that fact.

“I think the new rules make a lot of sense,” said Mark Slaugh, CEO of iComply, a cannabis industry compliance and consulting firm. “We’re putting out consumer education and teaching business owners and workers how to be responsible vendors. From a business decision, it’s a no-brainer.”

 

Insurance Brokers Reach Out To Marijuana Inc.

COLORADO: As political and cultural momentum builds for legalizing marijuana for medical and recreational use, it’s created a so-called “green rush” of people trying to cash in on the surge in cannabis-related businesses.

That surge is also creating new opportunities and challenges for a segment of insurance companies — firms that are now offering policies to marijuana growers, manufacturers and dispensaries in the states where cannabis is legal.

Of course, marijuana remains illegal under federal law. But last August the Justice Department announced it would not challenge state marijuana laws, and just last month Attorney General Eric Holder said legal marijuana business should have access to the banking system, if only out of consideration for public safety. [Read more…]

Insurance Brokers Reach Out To Marijuana Inc.

COLORADO: As political and cultural momentum builds for legalizing marijuana for medical and recreational use, it’s created a so-called “green rush” of people trying to cash in on the surge in cannabis-related businesses.

That surge is also creating new opportunities and challenges for a segment of insurance companies — firms that are now offering policies to marijuana growers, manufacturers and dispensaries in the states where cannabis is legal.

Of course, marijuana remains illegal under federal law. But last August the Justice Department announced it would not challenge state marijuana laws, and just last month Attorney General Eric Holder said legal marijuana business should have access to the banking system, if only out of consideration for public safety. [Read more…]

Tacoma Council Begins Marijuana Code Process

WASHINGTON: Tacoma City Council approved two interim laws relating to recreational marijuana sales Tuesday night.

The city’s new laws, one for land use and another for its nuisance code, nearly mirror the state’s suggested laws for recreational marijuana growers, processors and sales. [Read more…]

Proposed limits on recreational pot shop locations

Should recreational marijuana shops be allowed to be next door to each other? It is a question being raised by Denver City Councilman Paul López, as he proposes five amendments to the law regarding recreational marijuana.

Colorado voters approved the use and sale of recreational marijuana in November 2012. However, lawmakers in different cities are still working on rules surrounding the process. López is proposing five amendments that would, among other things, require that recreational marijuana shops not be within 2,500 feet of each other.

Video Link:

COLORADO: Proposed limits on Pot Shops