Larry Reed Tours SoL Reno

By Larry Reed, Man On Weed

I was recently invited to tour the SoL facilities in Reno, NV.  The vertically integrated cannabis company is a sponsor of The 4th Annual Jack Herer Cup in Las Vegas, NV.  Named after the man who racked up hundreds of  thousands of miles crossing the country for nearly 40 years campaigning to restore the hemp plant to American agriculture, The Jack Herer Cup is different from the normal cannabis cups you might be familiar with. It’s not three days, there is no vending, and you won’t find $5 dab stations. This Cup is a very respectful way to say thank you to someone who has in some way shape or form taken care of your family by helping his family.

 

Sol_logo_withsocialLocated about 15 minutes south of Reno, “The Biggest Little City In The World,” SoL’s location is easy to get to from anywhere in the area and worth the drive even if you’re not, because what you will see there is that epic!  After signing in at the welcome desk, and entering through the security door, I turn left and whamo: a continuous span of 20 foot high windows, over 100ft long,  that provide a view into the field of mean green goodness! The complete view of the working garden is right before your eyes: 1,000 cannabis plants all in bud cycle producing an amazing landscape of colas super swollen, trichomes glistening in the light and the aroma of Mother Nature’s finest bouquet of cannabis.

Are you familiar with the term “hog leg?” Pungent with distinctive terpene profiles pack in the 23,000 square foot greenhouse! All grown in natural sunlight. I’m no scientist but it would seem to me that 1 Sun is greater than however many lights you want to try and emulate the most powerful light source in our universe.  No corners were cut in the creation of SoL, the greenhouse is on the forefront of technology in the under roof organic cannabis farm. There is even a 3 foot riser that allows you to see over the canopy. Think Bob Ross after he paints happy autumn trees. All of this is in the lounge area. Yes a lounge area, a kin to a common area in library or office, a place to decompress, perhaps grab a beverage from the coffee bar (yes there really is a coffee bar there) and go view what is happening in the commercial kitchen. Commercial Kitchen? Yes, the row of windows that permit you to see in the farm terminate into the side of the kitchen that is also behind windows.  Transparency, that is what is happening here: from the transparent garden roof to the see through walls, the glass windows of the kitchen, all in full view. And for good reason, SoL has an amazing chef ready to create and everyone gets to watch his culinary creations.

If you’re able to pull yourself away from the cannabis carnival going on in your ocular sockets, there is still the state of the art dispensary to visit.

A wonderful combination of high tech meets hands on.  Digital menus drape the walls giving you the luxury of strolling and shopping while being able to see the menu from any place in the dispensary.  Between the menus, the walls are adorned with helpful information and an innovative way of helping you decide which cannabis fits what effects you are desiring.  It really will help you, if maybe you have a hard time deciding over 100 different medical and recreational cannabis products.

How did this gregarious garden of ganja, the Taj Mahal of THC transparency, this kingdom of kindness ever to come into existence.  It was the brainchild of Ed Alexander and his partners; each facet of the facility has been well thought out and implemented to provide a very warm and welcoming experience to all that visit.  Two things really jump out at you when you meet Ed, first, he puts the effort in to do it right.  When I asked about his timing into the market he replied. “SoL could have been known for being first. but we would rather be known as the one(s) that lasted”.

SoL’s sponsorship of the Jack Herer Cup fits into the company philosophy. “Jack was all about making cannabis transparent, seeing what was actually behind all the misinformation, it is our plan to keep that going,” Alexander told me. “That’s why SoL is better.”

After you’ve reached your buying limit and have tickled your THC bone so much that you just gotta get going, you exit onto a 2,000 sq ft deck, complete with comfy couches to relax and enjoy the mountain air.  Look to the horizon and you see the largest ski mountain in the area. The trails are visible from the deck and with adult use facilities on the horizon, this space is going to be a favorite for weeders world wide.

From the moment you walk in to the last moment you walk out, the motto repeats itself, SoL is better. SoL provides you with the most unique experience in the emerging dispensary market that can be found today.  SoL’s grand opening celebration kicks of October 26/27/28, lots of good times and great cannabis, make it if you can, tell them Larry Reed sent ya.

How The Tesla Battery Will Benefit Marijuana Growers

CALIFORNIA:  A medium-sized commercial weed grow with around 50 lights stands to save about $13,500 in electricity costs a year with the use of two Tesla Batteries. Those will also protect the plants in case of power outages while making the operation less visible to law enforcement. Elon Musk just made growing weed easier.

Unveiled last night, the Tesla Battery gives home owners and businesses an easy, slick, affordable way to store electricity at home. The 10kWh battery costs just $3,500 and can be “stacked” in sets of up to nine units. Larger capacity batteries of infinitely-scaleable capacity will be available to large businesses and governments. There’s three general use cases for the battery: storing electricity purchased during cheaper, off-peak hours for use during high-demand periods; storing electricity generated by solar power or other renewable sources for use around the clock; and as a backup power source for when the grid goes down.

Know who uses an awful lot of electricity? Weed growers. We just called one and put him on the phone with a commercial energy use management expert to figure out how the Tesla Battery will benefit his home operation and others like it.

 

Medical Marijuana Patients Fret About New Grower Limits Being Considered By Oregon Legislators

OREGON:  A bill that would limit the size of medical marijuana growing operations in Oregon is generating angry opposition from some patients and activists.

The proposed measure, unveiled late Friday afternoon, is aimed at curbing the black market while prodding larger growers to supply the legal recreational market the state is developing.

This approach is winning wide support on the House-Senate committee charged with implementing the marijuana legalization initiative approved by Oregon voters in November. It also has varying degrees of support from many marijuana industry figures who want to develop a successful legal market in the state.

 

Madera County Changes Marijuana Ordinance

CALIFORNIA:  Madera County just changed its marijuana ordinance and it’s officially in effect. And it’s no slap on the hand. The fines are hefty, and they’re aimed at those who are growing in excess.

Thursday, July 17, 2014. Cameras are rolling as Sheriff John Anderson navigates his way through a marijuana grow the size of a football field. 42 rows filled with plants hidden in a vegetable garden.

If that grow was discovered and raided today — the grower would be fined $250 per plant. Deputies pulled nearly 2,000 plants out of the ground. If you do the math, that’s $500,000 in fines.

Sheriff John Anderson said, “We decided we’ve got to control this somehow we’re running into acres and acres of marijuana and they’re saying they’re growing it for the compassionate care act.”

Inside A Washington Marijuana Micro-Grow

WASHINGTON:  This week my adventures took me to Permanent Farms in Puyallup, Washington. To be honest, I had no idea what I was walking into. I mean, I’ve been in a few cannabis gardens before, but this was different.

First of all, when I heard the word “Farms” in the title, I kind of pictured rolling hills with livestock and tractors. The address I was given, however, took me to a nice apartment complex. I walked up to the door, not knowing that I would be entering a cannabis spaceship on the other side.

The door opened and I was greeted with glowing lights, narrow walkways, shelves of little cannabis clones, and small rooms full of mama cannabis plants.  The very close quarters with everything in its exact place for maximum efficiency still managed to somehow have a very open and welcoming vibe.

Marijuana Farmers Lose Seattle Tax Exemption

WASHINGTON:  The Seattle City Council moved to close a tax loophole that benefits the pot growing business Monday, but it left the loophole alone for all other farmers.

Councilmember Nick Licata said that Medical Marijuana Dispensaries are already paying a business tax, giving the city more than $100,000 a year. And he believes marijuana farmers should be treated the same way. He won a unanimous council vote to change the law so that marijuana farmers will no longer be treated the same as the growers of fruits and vegetables. Marijuana farmers will no longer be able to take the agricultural exemption from the Business and Occupation tax.

“All of these advocates in the marijuana business, growing business agree that they want to pay taxes,” Licata said.

Marijuana Grow Could Sprout In A Battle Ground Building

WASHINGTON:  A Battle Ground developer has filed an application to build what could become one of the county’s first legal marijuana grow operations.

Dennis Pavlina, principal of the Gold Medal Group and developer of Battle Ground Village, filed paperwork on behalf of an outside brokerage group to develop an 18,000-square-foot building at 1618 S.E. Commerce Ave. The 1.02-acre property, which Pavlina owns, is zoned light industrial and appears to meet the state’s requirements for growing marijuana, approved by voters in 2012.

No deal is in place, Pavlina said, as the currently unnamed ownership group is awaiting approval from the Washington Liquor Control Board. Pavlina said he plans to sell the land if the state signs off on the group’s application.

“Right now, I’m just getting land approved for this use,” Pavlina said.

The newfound interest in the property came as a surprise to Pavlina, who said he didn’t know it was possible to build a marijuana facility there until he received interest from the group. It would become the first parcel of land Pavlina has sold in roughly a decade, he said.