Governor Phil Scott Announces Appointments To Vermont Cannabis Control Board

VERMONT: Governor Phil Scott announced today that he has appointed James Pepper of Montpelier, Julie Hulburd of Colchester and Kyle Harris of Montpelier to the Cannabis Control Board (CCB).

“The Board will play a critical role in ensuring public safety, equity and fairness while implementing this new market,” said Governor Phil Scott. “James, Julie and Kyle bring diverse and relevant experience to the CCB and I’m confident they will hit the ground running when they get to work in the coming days.”

Stopthedrugwar.orgThe CCB was created by Act 164 of 2020 for the purpose of safely, equitably and effectively implementing and administering the laws and rules regulating adult-use cannabis in Vermont. It is responsible for establishing, administering and regulating a cannabis regulatory system for commercial cannabis cultivators, wholesalers, product manufacturers, retailers and testing laboratories.

The CCB will also take over responsibility for the regulation of medical cannabis dispensaries and the administration of the medical cannabis registry, currently administered by the Vermont Department of Public Safety.

About the appointees:

James Pepper, Chair

James Pepper currently serves as a deputy state’s attorney for the Department of State’s Attorneys and Sheriffs. In this role, Pepper has worked on several criminal justice reform initiatives, including bail reform, expungement eligibility, Justice Reinvestment, use of force standards for law enforcement officers, and the expansion of juvenile jurisdiction.

Pepper also serves on the Racial Disparities in the Criminal and Juvenile Justice System Advisory Panel, the CHINS Reform Advisory Panel, the Juvenile Justice Advisory Panel, the Act 148 Working Group, and the Sentencing Commission. Prior to joining the Department, Pepper worked for former Governor Peter Shumlin as director of intergovernmental affairs and senior policy advisor, where he worked on relevant cannabis issues.

Pepper received his bachelor’s degree in political science from Johns Hopkins University and his J.D. from Vermont Law School. He and his wife Aly live in Montpelier with their identical twin boys, Beau and Wesley.

Julie Hulburd

Julie Hulburd currently serves as the human resources director at the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation and has over twenty years of Human Resources experience, including 12 years in municipal government. In her last municipal government role, Julie worked closely with leadership on the city’s diversity, equity, and inclusion goals.

Hulburd was appointed to the State Ethics Commission in 2018 and has served as its chair since 2019. She has also served as a member of her local parks and recreation advisory board, a justice of the peace and on the select board.

Hulburd has a bachelor’s degree from Northern Vermont University-Johnson. She also holds a Professional in Human Resources Certification from the Human Resources Certification Institute and is a Certified Professional with the Society for Human Resources Management. She regularly volunteers for the Vermont Brain Injury Association’s Walk for Thought, at the local Night to Shine event and the Miss Vermont Scholarship Organization.

Kyle Harris

Kyle Harris has served as an agriculture development specialist at the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets (VAAFM) since 2019. In this role, he has focused on emerging issues and economic development. His work has focused on dairy innovation, maple initiatives and hemp business development. He has worked closely with the Agency of Commerce and Community Development as a liaison between agencies to facilitate policy and economic discussion throughout Vermont’s agriculture portfolio. Most recently, he aided in development of Vermont’s Agriculture and Food System Strategic Plan 2021-2030.

Previous to his role with VAAFM, Harris served as the associate counsel for environmental affairs at the Corn Refiners Association in Washington, DC, where his work focused on improving the environmental footprint at both ends of the supply chain, from grower relations to growth in plant-based products and 21st century uses for agricultural feedstocks

Harris has a bachelor’s degree in history from the College of Charleston, and a J.D. & Master of Environmental Law & Policy from Vermont Law School. He has a license to practice law in Maryland. He lives in Montpelier with his wife Cate.

LDB Issues Product Call For Non-Medical Cannabis

CANADA: The BC Liquor Distribution Branch (LDB) has issued a second product call as part of a continuing effort to expand its wholesale product assortment for non-medical cannabis.

In July, the LDB entered into memorandums of understanding with 32 licensed producers to form its initial wholesale product assortment to cater to the B.C. market directly following legalization of non-medical cannabis on Oct. 17.

“Now that we have finalized our initial product assortment, we’re looking forward to engaging with additional licensed producers that are interested in supplying the B.C. market,” said Blain Lawson, LDB’s general manager and CEO. “There are more and more licensed producers coming online, and we are committed to working with them to ensure our product assortment remains as competitive as possible in order to compete with the illicit market.”

Licensed producers are invited to make submissions for dried cannabis (including pre-rolls), cannabis oils, capsules and seeds that comply with federal requirements, across various product segments.

The product call opens on Aug. 13 and closes on Aug. 31. Product calls will be issued on a regular basis going forward. Submission documents are available to licensed producers HERE.

Post Sessions: CCC PDX Calls For Industry Mobilization

Congressman Blumenauer said in response to the Sessions announcement that this is a call to action. It’s time for anyone who cares about cannabis to mobilize to defend state marijuana laws
 
So…what can we do now?
Come together with fellow law abiding and tax paying professionals in the Cannabis Industry and unite!  CCC 4.0 provides the perfect opportunity to ban together and show the media and the world that we will not back down.
REGISTER TODAY and receive $50 off (promo code: CCC50)
 
WHY TO ATTEND?  It’s time to be profitable!
The CCC has grown up with the industry in Oregon.  Now three years into full legalization, we no longer need to offer cannabis 101 education.  Now we are focused on education geared towards successfully and profitably operating in the current environment.  
 
 
There’s something for everyone at the CCC 4.0.  Session topics include:
  • Growers meet Buyers – wholesale, retail, processors
  • Ask the budtender – find out what’s hot & what’s not
  • State of the Industry; Congressman Blumenauer
  • OLCC Updates, Seed to Sale training, Q&A
  • Cameron Forni and Matt Morgan- “The Journey of a Cannabis Business”
  • Energy Pavilion – Energy reduction costs & rebates
  • Banking Panel with Maps & Salal Credit Unions and OR Dept of Treasury
  • Cannabis Connex & Investor Lounge buying? selling? meet with cannabis valuation experts & investors
  • Moving across state lines – Expansion, licensing
  • Processing overview and post-extraction experts
  • Science utilization; DNA mapping, terpenes, scent control
  • Running the business more efficiently
  • Collaborate with 120 industry vendors
  • Product will be on display
  • Investor Forum: accessing capital, securities law, trademarks, attracting investors, California update, Investor due diligence & partnerships

The Cannabis Industry Is Coming To Anchorage Alaska

ALASKA:  Alaska is the next US state that will soon be selling recreational marijuana, and the cannabis industry is watching with keen anticipation.

The Alaska Alcohol and Marijuana Control Office issued its first licenses for cannabis producers and testing facilities this month.   Retail licenses are to be given out in September.

In anticipation of the opening of the market, the cannabis industry will assemble at The Last Frontier for CannaCon Alaska — the state’s first major trade show.   Billed as the place  ‘where the cannabis industry does business,’ CannaCon will be a two day event in Anchorage, September 9-10, at the Dena’ina Convention Center.

Bringing producers, processors and retailers together with the businesses that support them,  CannaCon will feature a line up of  experts to share their valuable cannabis industry knowledge with attendees.

For those from legal cannabis states where marijuana retail shops have been operating for a couple of years there is a great deal of interest in seeing how Alaska manages legalization. Back in 2014 when CannaCon had its first show in Tacoma, Washington attendees and exhibitors were filled with hope and anticipation for the future of cannabis. Two years later and those same people are still making their dreams happen but with the realization that legalization comes with a heavy and burdening dose of bureaucracy.

Running a cannabis business in any state has proven to bring very uniques challenges not found in mainstream industries. It is hopeful that Alaska will be able to learn from the mistakes of other states and be able to launch a successful recreational marijuana industry with minimal roadblocks.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUbmzGsQQX8&w=560&h=315]

Soap Lake, WA Resident Petitions Council To Embrace Marijuana Culture

WASHINGTON: A Soap Lake resident is petitioning the city council to embrace marijuana culture and bring marijuana-related businesses into the city.

Gary Gregg spoke to the council Wednesday night, asking the council members to consider taking advantage of legislation that permits and regulates the production, distribution and possession of marijuana for people 21 and over in Washington State.

“What I would like to talk to you guys about is the opportunity that Soap Lake has that, quite frankly, it will never happen in any of our lifetimes, if ever again. That is the chance to get this place into a bustling town. A place that we all envision it to be,” Gregg told the council. “And that is the idea of embracing something that would not cost us virtually any money. And that is the marijuana culture that is going on in this state, Colorado and across the country.”

Women Leaders in Cannabis finds group to take Thanksgiving donations

OREGON:  A nonprofit trade organization based on philanthropy has reached out to help during the holiday – but had the offer turned down.

The group, “Women Leaders in Cannabis,” says it’s been denied several times.

The Eugene office of the Oregon Department of Human Services and two charities said “no” when the group wanted to donate turkey dinner baskets to clients in need.

But they finally found a group who said “yes”.

KindTree Autism Rocks is a volunteer group that celebrates people in the autism community.

When WLC said they wanted to donate food baskets, Autism Rocks was excited to receive them.

The group says they are not concerned about WLC’S association with cannabis.

“It’s more about, you know, let’s meet a need in this community and it’s an act of generous giving and passing forward,” said Vice President Molly Elliott of Autism Rocks.

 

Denver Makes Plans For Symposium On Local Marijuana Regulation, Seen As First Of Its Kind

COLORADO:  Denver city officials didn’t exactly embrace Amendment 64 before voters statewide — and heavily in Denver — approved recreational marijuana legalization in 2012.

But Mayor Michael Hancock and his administration is taking a new opportunity to exhibit pride in the city’s regulation of the retail cannabis industry.

This week the city’s Office of Marijuana Policy, headed by Ashley Kilroy, announced that it will host a two-day “marijuana management symposium” Nov. 5-6 at the Colorado Convention Center. It has invited attendees from across the country, largely targeting local governments that also are adjusting to legalized marijuana or might face a similar challenge on the horizon.

Advocates In Denver, Home To Legal Marijuana, Seek Public Place To Smoke

COLORADO:  Whether bought from a downtown shop or cadged from a friend’s basement greenhouse, legal marijuana is easy to find in Colorado. Places to smoke it, not so much.

Smoking in private homes and on front porches is allowed. But under a thicket of state, local and private regulations, marijuana use here, in a state at the forefront of legalization, is banned from parks and sidewalks, airport smoking areas, hotel rooms, gallery events, nightclubs and nearly every other corner of public life. Smoking in public is regularly ticketed, and this spring, the Denver police raided two private, marijuana-friendly clubs and handed out citations.

But in the latest battle over legalizing marijuana, advocates are seeking to allow legal pot use to tiptoe ever so slightly into public, into establishments like bars or clubs that cater to over-21 crowds. Supporters are calling it “limited social cannabis use.”

Colorado Resorts Continue Rocky Mountain Quest To Attract Oregon Skiers

COLORADO:  Hey, Oregon skiers, the heavy breathing you feel over your shoulder may by a representative of a Rocky Mountain ski area trying to get you to go skiing or snowboarding there this winter.

Hot on the heals of an Aug. 20 Portland visit by representatives of Ski Utah, marketeers of Colorado skiing and tourism wined and dined Portland journalists on Aug. 26. They hit Seattle, too.

The Utah visit beat the arrival of my first Powder magazine of the season by one day and the Colorado visit beat Ski magazine’s arrival by two days.

Almost 200 Applications Filed For Vancouver’s Pot Dispensary Licence

CANADA:  The city of Vancouver has received nearly 200 applications from illegal medical marijuana dispensaries seeking business licences, setting off a process that is expected to dramatically reduce the number of such operations while making Vancouver the first jurisdiction in Canada to regulate storefront pot sales.

Citing the proliferation of illegal pot shops, city council approved new rules earlier this year that will award business licences in exchange for hefty fees, as well as place restrictions on where dispensaries can be located and what they can sell. There are currently more than 100 shops openly selling the drug in all corners of the city, even as pot sales remain illegal outside of the licensed federal medical-marijuana regime.

By last Friday’s deadline, the city received 176 applications, though only a fraction of those are expected to actually survive the licensing process.