Potlines App Helps Marijuana Users Stay On The Right Path

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  Marijuana is already legal for medical and recreational use in the District of Columbia. Alaska, Oregon, Washington and Colorado also allow recreational use and possession of cannabis.

Twenty-three states from Maine to California allow medical marijuana use. But if you are taking a road trip from the NorthEastern shore to Southern California, there are a lot of states in between where marijuana is still illegal.

The laws are constantly changing and  the laws for use and possession in those states is not uniform.

And ignorance of the law is not a legal defense.

Apple Reverses Course, Allows Marijuana Apps In Marijuana-Legal States

CALIFORNIA:  Months after Apple pulled marijuana user social app MassRoots from the App Store on November 4, 2014, the Cupertino company has reversed course and allowed the app in the App Store as long as its geo-restricted to the 23 states where marijuana is legal, MassRoots founder Isaac Dietrich told the San Francisco Chronicle

“A few hours ago, an Apple representative called to notify us that our efforts were successful: the App Store is permitting cannabis social apps that are geo-restricted to the 23 states that have legalized medicinal cannabis. MassRoots is available for download in the App Store,” Dietrich said.

In a blog post on its website, MassRoots notes that it will be “implementing new features to strengthen our compliance even beyond what is currently required.” 

Currently, the app requires users to login to their account to use the app. When a user registers a new account within the app, it requires location access to verify that the user is in one of the 23 states where marijuana is legal. However, users who register for a MassRoots account on its website and then log into the app do not undergo the state check, opening the possibility for users to lie about which state they’re residing in. 

LA City Attorney Sues To Block Marijuana Delivery App

CALIFORNIA: The Los Angeles city attorney filed a lawsuit Tuesday to shut down a mobile phone application that arranges medical marijuana home deliveries.

The suit alleges that the iPhone and Android free app, Nestdrop, is a “flagrant attempt” to bypass restrictions contained in Proposition D, the medical marijuana law approved by Los Angeles voters last year.

Nestdrop links customers with delivery services. It started as an alcoholic beverage delivery service but added marijuana in November, promising arrival within an hour.

Pot delivery is currently only available in Los Angeles, but the company has said it wants to expand throughout Southern California.

Customers must prove they have a doctor’s prescription and must be a member of a medical marijuana collective, although they can join a local one through the app.

The company said it works with local dispensaries that can provide pot in bud, edible and concentrated forms.