Iowa Medical-Marijuana Proponent Dies Of Cancer

IOWA: One of Iowa’s clearest voices on behalf of legalized medical marijuana has died before she could see her efforts succeed.

Lori Tassin, 44, of Des Moines was a regular presence at the Statehouse last spring, button-holing legislators and testifying about why she and other ill Iowans should have the right to try marijuana. She died Friday of the cancer she’d been fighting for five years.

Tassin contended that many other medications doctors prescribe routinely are vastly more dangerous than marijuana.  At a Senate hearing in February, she unfolded a multi-page insert that came with her chemotherapy drug. The document listed numerous possible side effects of the drug, which she was taking for the tumors that had spread from her lungs to her brain. “Tell me that’s not pretty scary to look at,” she said, holding up the lengthy document for the senators to see.

Eugene TV Anchor Fired After Testing Positive For Marijuana

OREGON:  An Oregon television anchor has turned into a marijuana activist after being fired for testing positive for the drug.

Cyd Maurer, a morning weekend anchor at Eugene’s ABC affiliate KEZI-TV, said she was fired in May after getting into a minor accident while on assignment. In a video posted online, Maurer said that after the accident she was forced to take a drug test per company policy and failed it.

Maurer, 25, said she was completely sober at work and had used the marijuana several days before. Studies show marijuana, unlike alcohol, can be detected in some people for days after use — or even weeks, in case of frequent users.

Maurer, who has been working in television for the past three years and is a University of Oregon graduate, said she didn’t do anything wrong and felt the firing was discriminatory.

The Interview: Marijuana Activists Marc And Jodie Emery

CANADA:  Marc Emery’s two decades of marijuana activism and entrepreneurship have earned him the nickname “The Prince of Pot” and 23 trips to jail. The most recent, a 4½-year stint in U.S. federal custody for his mail-order pot seed business, is now at an end. Awaiting deportation back to Canada, he spoke to Maclean’sabout his plans for the future from inside a Louisiana detention centre. His wife and fellow activist, Jodie Emery, joined in from their Vancouver home.

Q: Marc, you were released on July 9. What’s the holdup in getting you back to Canada?

ME: It’s just bureaucracy. It’s all about my passport. And of course, the reason I don’t have one is the Canadian government took it away from me when I was arrested in 2005. I was brought here by Canadian officials and delivered to American officials. They know who I am. They know I’m here.

 

 

 

Roger Roffman Chronicles Society’s Long Struggle With Pot In ‘Marijuana Nation’

WASHINGTON:  Roger Roffman is a UW professor emeritus of social work who has studied marijuana dependence interventions for 30 years, and was a sponsor of Initiative 502, which legalized recreational marijuana in Washington. He answered a few questions about his new book, “Marijuana Nation: One Man’s Chronicle of America Getting High: From Vietnam to Legalization.”

Q: Your first experience with marijuana laws was during a court martial for a fellow soldier in Vietnam who was caught with the equivalent of 10 joints. How did that start your journey as a marijuana activist?

A: In 1967 I was a social work officer with the 9th Infantry Division. Doing that work, I began to have an inkling of what we’d much later recognize as the severe psychological injuries many soldiers experienced. Alcohol was the universal de-stressor, with shared drinking contributing to group cohesion and camaraderie. While illegal under the Code of Military Justice, shared pot smoking appeared to fulfill a similar purpose. When serving on the board that conducted that soldier’s court martial, I argued imprisonment would be excessive given the context. I was outvoted, he went to jail for four months, and the injustice of that penalty troubled me.

Creating The Cures

By Tawnee Cowan

WASHINGTON: Dawn Darington is a woman on a mission. Dawn is desperately seeking the cure for cancer using cannabis, and at the same time reaching out to teach all of us in the community how to heal ourselves and others. Dawn is known to say, “Education is key.”

Some time ago a patient found himself seeking Dawn because he had no other hope. He was a patient in Spokane and he had been fighting colon cancer. Treatment had ravaged his body completely and the doctors had advised him to get his affairs in order. Dawn immediately started him on oil and after 13 months of treatment on the oil, he just got the news that he is cancer free. [Read more…]

Creating The Cures

By Tawnee Cowan

WASHINGTON: Dawn Darington is a woman on a mission. Dawn is desperately seeking the cure for cancer using cannabis, and at the same time reaching out to teach all of us in the community how to heal ourselves and others. Dawn is known to say, “Education is key.”

Some time ago a patient found himself seeking Dawn because he had no other hope. He was a patient in Spokane and he had been fighting colon cancer. Treatment had ravaged his body completely and the doctors had advised him to get his affairs in order. Dawn immediately started him on oil and after 13 months of treatment on the oil, he just got the news that he is cancer free. [Read more…]

Confrontational Pot Smoker Gets A Year Probation

PENNSYLVANIA: An organizer of a marijuana-legalization rally that drew more than 100 people and ended in scuffles with law-enforcement officers on Independence Mall in May was sentenced in federal court yesterday to one year of probation.

Richard Tamaccio, 34, a Philadelphian comedian who goes by the stage name N.a. Poe, was also ordered by U.S. Magistrate Judge Henry Perkin during his probation to, among other things:

* Not use drugs.

* Undergo drug testing.

* Not enter within 100 feet of Independence National Historical Park if there is a demonstration promoting a criminal act, such as smoking pot. [Read more…]