Colorado Lawmakers Consider New Requirements For Marijuana Edibles

COLORADO:  The gummy bears were just sweet. But the candy raspberries and watermelon slices presented to a group of Colorado legislators on Thursday contained enough THC to make the issue they were contemplating plenty fuzzy.

“If you can’t tell the difference, how could a 3-year-old?” Rep. Frank McNulty, R-Highlands Ranch, asked members of the House Health, Insurance and Environment Committee.

McNulty is sponsoring a bill that would require candies and other foods infused with marijuana be shaped, marked or colored in a such a way that anyone could identify them as a gateway to several hours of altered consciousness.

Denver International Airport First Denver Facility To Ban Marijuana Possession

COLORADO:  Denver International Airport will be the first city facility to prohibit marijuana possession on all of its property as it attempts to combat illegal interstate trafficking in the face of federal law.

Airport officials plan to begin enforcing the new policy, which is the furthest-reaching among the city’s marijuana limitations, in early January.

Recently adopted city ordinances ban the display and transfer — but not mere possession — of marijuana on city-owned property including parks, the 16th Street Mall, streets and sidewalks near schools.

“We talked to all of (the federal agencies involved), and they’ve expressed concern for good reason, but it was our decision based on the way the airport operates,” said Stacey Stegman, DIA spokeswoman. “We didn’t want to impact other airports and other agencies, and we didn’t want to facilitate transporting marijuana across state lines.”

Stegman said DIA chose to bar all possession and display of pot to eliminate confusion and make the same rules apply to all. She said the presence of federal agencies at DIA also was a factor; marijuana remains illegal under federal law.

 

Pot Shots Fired: Recreational Vs. Medicinal In Washington State

WASHINGTON:  As Washington begins to accept applications for the state’s first regulated recreational pot shops, cries of protest about the its plans for medical marijuana are coming from unexpected quarters: the left. A year after voters put their state on track to become one of the only places in the world where marijuana can be legally owned and sold for purely recreational use, the state legislature still has to decide what to do with its rickety, fifteen-year-old medical-marijuana system. With the Department of Justice’s hawkish eyes trained on the state—determined to ensure that the drug, which is still illegal under federal law—remains under strict control, some bureaucrats and lawmakers are afraid that Washington’s unregulated medical-marijuana system could doom the whole experiment.

In October, a working group commissioned by the legislature recommended that lawmakers should fold regulation of medical marijuana into the new recreational system, with a tax break for patients but few other concessions, like a personal growing exception for medical use or separate stores for therapeutic weed. [Read more…]