Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program Now Taking Applications For 2017

KENTUCKY: Kentuckians interested in participating in the industrial hemp research pilot program in 2017 are invited to submit an application with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

The pilot research program will continue to build on the successes of the previous administration by developing research data on industrial hemp production, processing, manufacturing, and marketing for Kentucky growers,” Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said. “KDA’s objective is to expand and strengthen Kentucky’s research pilot program, so that if the federal government chooses to remove industrial hemp from the list of controlled substances, Kentucky’s growers and farmers will be positioned to thrive, prosper and ultimately prevail as national leaders in industrial hemp production.”

The KDA operates its program under the authority of a provision of the 2014 federal farm bill, 7 U.S.C. § 5940, that permits industrial hemp pilot programs in states where hemp production is permitted by state law. Participants planted more than 2,350 acres of hemp in 2016 compared with 922 acres in 2015 and 33 acres in 2014, the first year of the program.

Applicants should be aware of important new measures for the 2017 research program, including the following:

  • To strengthen the department’s partnership with state and local law enforcement officers, KDA will provide GPS coordinates of approved industrial hemp planting sites to law enforcement agencies before any hemp is planted. GPS coordinates must be submitted on the application. Applicants must consent to allow program staff and law enforcement officers to inspect any premises where hemp or hemp products are being grown, handled, stored, or processed.
  • To promote transparency and ensure a fair playing field, KDA will rely on objective criteria, outlined in the newly released 2017 Policy Guide, to evaluate applications. An applicant’s criminal background check must indicate no drug-related misdemeanor convictions, and no felony convictions of any kind, in the past 10 years. Staff with the KDA’s industrial hemp pilot project program will consider whether applicants have complied with instructions from the department, Kentucky State Police, and local law enforcement.
  • As the research program continues to grow, KDA’s hemp staff needs additional resources and manpower to administer this tremendously popular program. The addition of participant fees will enable KDA Hemp Staff to handle an increasing workload without needing additional taxpayer dollars from the General Assembly. Program applicants will be required to submit a nonrefundable application fee of $50 with their applications. Successful applicants will be required to pay additional program fees.

Grower applications must be postmarked or received by the KDA marketing office no later than November 14, 2016 at 4:30 p.m. EST. Processor or handler applicants are encouraged to submit their applications by November 14, 2016 at 4:30 p.m. EST.

For more information, including the 2017 Policy Guide and a downloadable application, go to kyagr.com/hemp.

CV Sciences Sponsors Murray State University’s Hemp Field Day August 4, 2016

Open To Public, The Event Marks a Year of Exceptional Strides in Research and Gives Attendees the Rare Opportunity to View Hemp Research Plots First Hand

KENTUCKY:  Murray State University is just one of several universities in Kentucky that has partnered with CV Sciences to further the research and development of the industrial hemp industry. This year marks the third year of the relationship, with the first field being planted in May of 2014. This Hemp Field Day, held on Murray State University’s campus — will serve as an opportunity to reflect on both successes and failures when it comes to cultivating the long dormant crop. The event will feature speakers, research presentations, and serve as an opportunity for all attendees to view the progress of several hemp fields currently in growth.

“As you would expect with any pilot program, there have been bumps along the way, and there are still many unanswered questions but we have to start somewhere to develop this crop,” said Tony Brannon, Dean of the Hutson School of Agriculture at Murray State University, “We were able to get the seed in the ground earlier this year and we are excited to let people view the crop and share what we’ve found and what we’re learning.”

The public event is an opportunity for industry stalwarts to network, share information, and gather new research insights. The field day will also allow those who are curious about the industry to find out more about the past, present, and future of industrial hemp. Beginning at 1:00 p.m., the educational program will consist of hemp program updates from Josh Hendrix, director of business development, domestic production for CV Sciences, Inc., the , local farmer partner Joseph Kelly, and University of Kentucky graduate researcher Leah Black. Stuart Tomc, VP of Human Nutrition at CV Sciences will deliver the day’s keynote address entitled “The Cannabis Disruption: Bringing Hemp Back,” which will discuss the reasons hemp is relevant and important right now.

The second portion of the day will be devoted to field visits, where attendees will be able to view current research plots and take part in agronomic discussion. At 3:30 p.m., attendees will leave MSU’s West Farm, park at the Cherry West Kentucky Exposition Center and proceed to the Field Sites.

Josh Hendrix, who is a Kentucky hemp farmer in addition to his role at CV Sciences said, “[t]his is an industry on the cusp of some big developments, but there is still a lot of opportunities for education and for outreach about what it is that we are doing. We’re looking forward to giving people the chance to see the fields for themselves, as a tangible marker for how far we’ve come and where we might be able to go with this.”

Kentucky Industrial Hemp Production Starting Second Planting

KENTUCKY: From THC levels to plant shape and uses, industrial hemp is worlds apart from its cannabis cousin marijuana, Maysville Rotary Club members learned on Tuesday.

Speaking at its meeting was Adam Watson, manager of the Organic Certification Program at the Kentucky Department of Agriculture.

Watson is also coordinator for the industrial hemp program in Kentucky which has been progressing since the passage of Kentucky Senate Bill 50 in 2013 and the Federal Farm Bill enacted in 2014.

Currently in the experimental stage, hemp production methods at the 20 Kentucky growers have been in line with how the plant is grown in Canada, Watson said.

Estimated crop value would be in the $600 to $800 per acre planted, Watson said.

 

University Of Kentucky Researchers Harvest Hemp Crop

KENTUCKY:   University of Kentucky researchers have harvested the university’s first hemp crop in decades.

“It was a good growing season for many crops, not just hemp,” said David Williams, UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment agronomist and co-project lead. “Precipitation was excellent this year and more than adequate for growth. The only downside to the growing season was that we planted a little bit late, but I don’t think that had much effect on the crop.”

UK’s research plot, planted May 27, was one of the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s pilot studies to reintroduce hemp production in Kentucky. UK’s study was conducted in conjunction with Eastern Kentucky University and Kentucky State University.

“Congratulations to the University of Kentucky and all of our partners in the hemp pilot projects on the first hemp crop in Kentucky in almost 70 years,” said Agriculture Commissioner James Comer, who has championed the cause of returning hemp production to the commonwealth. “This crop will yield significant data about production techniques, which varieties do best in Kentucky and which of the many uses of hemp are most likely to succeed here.”