Marijuana Grow Ops Wreck Properties

AUSTRALIA:  In addition to incurring unwanted complications involving law enforcement, the running of marijuana grow operations by tenants can pose a plethora of hazards to the condition of rental properties as well as the health of current and subsequent occupants.

One of the chief hazards to properties caused by marijuana grow operations is water damage, given that the illicit cultivation of cannabis involves running what are essentially indoor farms.

Water damage can in and of itself can severely compromise the material condition of a property, resulting in the rotting of timber structures and the rusting of steel, as well as the de-lamination of key materials such as plywood and the destruction of carpeting, wallpaper and paint.

The presence of water in tandem with other aspects of marijuana grow operations also provide the ideal conditions for the proliferation of mould.

Marijuana Production: The Next Great Energy Hog?

COLORADO:  As a growing number of states flirt with marijuana legalization, they must grapple with how best to bring a multi-billion dollar industry out from the shadows and into the light of the regulated, tax-paying world. While both sides of the legalization debate cherry pick the results of these experiments to support their particular point of view, the new reality on the ground has highlighted one facet that few are talking about: marijuana production is a huge power suck.

At least producing marijuana indoors is a big fat electricity hog, which is how the vast majority of legal growhouses still operate. This issue is destined to become more pronounced in Colorado next month when the state opens the doors for standalone production facilities. Previously, the state had an inefficient system in which production facilities had to be vertically integrated with retail outlets. This coming phase has prompted a run on warehouse spaces around the Centennial State, foretelling a rush of new electron-thirsty grow operations.

 

Traditionally, marijuana production has been an indoor activity—for understandable reasons. But why is a now kinda-sorta-legal plant still grown the same way it was under total prohibition? There’s a number of contributing factors.

For one, there’s a certain amount of inertia from an industry that grew up indoors—right or wrong, there is a pervasive idea that indoor cultivation gives growers a control over their product that might not be achievable outside. Some is due to security concerns (it’s still amostly cash business, though this will likely change with time). However, the biggest contributor might just be the evolving and conflicting patchwork of state and federal laws that make normal energy-efficient production process unfeasible. For now.

 

Pot Growers Are Snatching Up Warehouse Space In Denver

COLORADO:  Industrial warehouse space in Denver is suddenly a hot commodity in short supply, as the city’s marijuana farmers look for grow space to help meet the surge in demand for legal recreational pot.

Warehouse space in Denver is now leasing for up to four times the rate it went for before medical marijuana first sent legal pot sales climbing in 2009, the Denver Post reports. At 3.1 percent, the city’s industrial vacancy rate is the lowest it has been in decades.

Denver’s warehouse rush is likely to only intensify, as pot farmers scramble to meet demand that has already stressed the available supply of above-board product since recreational pot became legal in Colorado on Jan. 1. Officials announced this week that the state has already collected $2 million in taxes on $14 million in total recreational pot sales in 2014.