Washington: WSLCB Issues Advertising Warning Requirements For All Cannabis Products

wslcbMarijuana Producers, Processors and Retailers
Bulletin No 19-02

Date: May 31, 2019
To: Industry Members
From: Matt McCallum, Enforcement Advertising Coordinator
Subject:Warnings required on text message advertising

Text message advertising is required to follow the advertising warning requirements like any other general marijuana advertisement.

WAC 314-55-155(6) states that except for outdoor advertising, all advertising must contain the following warnings:

  • (a) “This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming.”;
  • (b) “Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.”;
  • (c) “There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product.”; and
  • (d) “For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.”

Warnings alone may not be attached via a link, or any other method that would require the recipient or receiver of the text advertisement to perform an action to access the warnings separate from the text message.

An example of what would be allowed would be a trade name or non-advertising language, accompanied by a link within the text that takes individuals to the advertisement which contains the required warnings. If any part of the text message itself can be considered advertising, however, it will need to contain all required warnings.

Please take a moment to assess your current text advertisement warning practices and correct, if appropriate. If you have questions about these requirements, please contact your area LCB enforcement officer.

Updated List Of Pesticides Allowed For Use In Marijuana Production

WASHINGTON: The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has recently updated the list of pesticides that are allowed for use in marijuana production in Washington State, based on criteria previously established by WSDA. 

The WSDA has added 12 pesticides to the list of allowable products. Pesticides containing two new active ingredients (Cinnamaldehyde, Gliocladium catenulatum Strain J1446) were added to the list. Most of the pesticides that were added to the list contain active ingredients that were already allowed for use in marijuana production.

Some pesticides are labeled for application to soil or to crop plants, while some pesticides are labeled for application to both soil and crop plants (e.g., insecticides, fungicides). Other pesticides include herbicides labeled for direct application to, and control of, unwanted plants (i.e., weeds). Remember to read, understand, and comply with all applicable label directions and precautions when using any pesticide.

Added

  1. AZERA PRO, EPA Reg. No. 1021-1872
  2. DEADZONE, EPA Reg. No. 73729-1
  3. DESECT AG DIATOMACEOUS EARTH INSECTICIDE, EPA Reg. No. 7655-1
  4. PRESTOP WG, EPA Reg. No. 64137-13
  5. PVENT, EPA Reg. No. 64137-13-70299
  6. SEICAN, EPA Reg. No. 91473-2
  7. SLUGGO MAXX, EPA Reg. No. 67702-55
  8. CINNERATE, WA Reg. No. 998200-14001
  9. ELEMONATEM, WA Reg. No. 999860-16001
  10. HEDGE NATURAL DEFENSE PLANT PROTECTANT, WA Reg. No. 997420-18001
  11. PROCIDIC2, WA Reg. No. 999550-16002
  12. PURELY GREEN BIO-PESTICIDE SUPER CONCENTRATE, WA Reg. No. 84289-18001

You can find the complete list of pesticides that are allowed for use in marijuana production, the criteria WSDA used to establish the list, and information regarding statewide stop-sale orders in Washington on the WSDA web site. 

Washington State Legal Cannabis By The Numbers: February 1, 2018 – May 17, 2018

WASHINGTON: The below statistics cover activity in Leaf Data Systems for the time period between February 1, 2018 and May 17, 2018.

Leaf Data Systems 5/17/18

Leaf Data Systems 5/17/18

 

 

Cannabis Industry Ambassador-At-Large: Twenty22Many Art Auction

Twenty22Many is a Washington-based Veterans group, born out of the old Medical Marijuana Collective model that preceded recreational cannabis in Washington State.

The mission of the Twenty22Many is “By All Means Necessary – End Veteran Suicide.” Founder Patrick Saint, and other volunteer veterans are committed to raising awareness about the extremely high suicide rates among our military veterans — it is reported that 22 daily suicides occur daily in America.

Patrick and his group of Veteran volunteers turned to Washington State’s newly licensed recreational cannabis community for help. Together, they created the Twenty22Many Veteran Support Depot Program to offer vets a safe haven and access to resources.

If a veteran walks through the door of a participating retailer in need of anything, they will be given a flyer with valuable contact information on it.  Once contacted, Twenty22Many will promptly dispatch a veteran volunteer and resources to that veteran in need.  Twenty22Many Veteran Support Depot Program essentially converts participating I-502 stores into little Veteran hubs all over the state.

I grew up in a military family. Both my father and a sister served in the armed forces, and so I was especially excited to join Twenty22Many at their annual fundraiser as a guest of the founder.  The auction was held at Heylo Cannabis Extractions in Sodo Seattle.

These works are like DMT meet LSD

These works are like DMT meet LSD

The evening started off with an art auction. The featured artist was Adream, whose work is so detailed and inspiring. These works were both colorful and spiritual in some mystical way — like DMT meet LSD.

I also attended a glass blowing event earlier, hosted by Weekend Unlimited, Jerome Baker Designs and Leafly. Jason Harris of JBD Glass graciously donated a wonderful JBD bong to Patrick and Twenty22Many for auction at the evening event.

 

Jason Harris of JBD Glass so graciously donated a wonderful JBD bong to Patrick and the Twenty22Many.

Jason Harris of JBD Glass so graciously donated a wonderful JBD bong to Patrick and the Twenty22Many.

I was given the extreme honor to present Patrick with a Challenge Coin. In the military, challenge coins are often offered to visiting dignitaries or guest of a unit or platoon.  This particular coin was given to me by Four-Star General “Skip” Dreps, a well-known Veterans advocate who works with the Disabled Veterans of the Pacific Northwest. General Dreps is a good friend of Jake The Professor who always jumps at the chance to help his fellow brothers in arms.

Thank you to Heylo Canbabis Extractions, the Space Shuttle, and Twenty22Many for helping us understand the needs of the veterans community and offering us an opportunity help.

Patrick Saint and Twenty22Many need our support to carry out this very important mission. I invite you to work with us to reduce suicide rates within the Veterans community.  Please reach out to Twenty22Many in Olympia to participate in this life saving program.

 

Grow-less In Seattle: A Tale Of Two Home Growing Bills

By Bailey Hirschburg

WASHINGTON: If you’ve been following legalization in Washington,  you probably know that we’re the only one of the eight legal states (plus the District of Columbia) that does not allow adults to grow their own cannabis at home.

Initiative 502’s authors decided to drop home grow, in an effort to broaden its appeal. Washington’s initiative passed in 2012 with 56% of the vote — the same as Colorado whose law includes personal cultivation — a missed opportunity.

In the years that followed, political action in Olympia focused first on setting up the first crop of licensed growers, processors, and retailers. Then, legislators turned their attention to reforming the state’s medical marijuana laws, eliminating largely unregulated collectives in favor of registered co-ops, and offering the largest cannabis gardens and biggest retail discounts to patients registered with Washington’s Department of Health.

Nearly four and a half years after Washington picked a new approach to personal cannabis use,  we’re only now talking about personal cultivation and so there was a lot of anticipation coming into the Commerce and Gaming Committee’s hearings on house bills 1092 and 1212 last Monday. The two home grow bills are basically the same, both legalizing cultivation for adults 21 and older. HB1092, sponsored by Rep. Sherry Appleton (D-23rd), has been discussed and promoted more in the greener corners of the internet.

Appleton has been supportive of cannabis reform for several years, and is known as a genuine ally. Her bill is short and straightforward, and allows houses with more than one person over 21 to have up to 12 plants while retaining up to 48 ounces of harvested cannabis. Based solely on plant count, its easy to call Appleton’s bill the best one.

But HB1212, sponsored by Rep. Brian Blake (D-19th), while allowing only 6 plants and 24 ounces per house, has some benefits Appleton’s bill lacks. First, it legalizes sharing and gifting of cannabis between adults, a little-enforced, but still felony offense in the state. Blake’s bill would also allow adults, patients, and caregivers to contract with laboratories directly to have their cannabis plants scientifically tested for potency and contaminants. Both sharing and individual testing would benefit patients and recreational growers.

HB1212 also restructures possession offenses for cannabis generally, possession of more than six plants but less than 18 would be a civil infraction for every excess plant. Over 18 plants is a misdemeanor, and 40 or more is a felony.

Rep. Blake’s legislation has two more benefits, first, Blake sits on the Commerce and Gaming Committee, well positioned to push for its passage. The second is more speculative, but when there are two bills dealing with cannabis, I’ve found he conservatively worded is more likely to gain support.

At Monday’s hearing many of those speaking in support were patients and their families. Also present were cannabis licensees and industry representatives. Those speaking in opposition were Rick Garza from Washington’s Liquor and Cannabis Board and Seth Dawson representing Washington Association for Substance Abuse Prevention.

As a lobbyist for Washington NORML PAC, I was the only person to testify as a recreational consumer and prospective grower. My argument was similar to those made by others: the rest of the legal states already allow for home grow; it keeps police resources focused on large scale trafficking and violent crime; and most of us won’t be Cannabis Cup level master growers.

But I made one more argument that no one else did. Section 7 of our state constitution reads “No person shall be disturbed in his private affairs, or his home invaded, without authority of law.” Maybe the state once had a valid interest in violating homes for a plant, I said, but not when voters rejected prohibition. You don’t have to like cannabis to agree that our constitution thinks the homes and affairs of its citizens should be sacred.

Following the hearing several committee members said they were interested in passing one of the bills, a republican member said he was more likely to support 1212 than 1092. If the majority of the committee votes “Do Pass” on either bill it will advance to another committee, eventually having to pass the house, and do the whole process again in the state senate.

No state has legalized personal cultivation outside of the ballot box, so just making the case to one committee in one chamber of the legislature brings Washington one step closer to making cannabis history.

Watch the hearing on TVW:

Contact members of the Commerce and Gaming Committee here and urge passage of either HB1092 or HB1212.

  • David.Sawyer@leg.wa.gov
  • Shelley.Kloba@leg.wa.gov
  • Cary.Condotta@leg.wa.gov
  • Brandon.Vick@leg.wa.gov
  • Andrew.Barkis@leg.wa.gov
  • Brian.Blake@leg.wa.gov
  • Jessyn.Farrell@leg.wa.gov
  • Bill.Jenkin@leg.wa.gov
  • Steve.Kirby@leg.wa.gov
  • Cindy.Ryu@leg.wa.gov
  • Jesse.Young@leg.wa.gov

 

Canada Coal Signs Non-Binding LOI With Washington Producer Honu

CANADA: Canada Coal announced that it has signed a non-binding Letter of Intent (“LOI”) with Honu Inc., a licensed marijuana grower and producer of marijuana concentrates and edible marijuana products in the State of Washington. The LOI provides for a 90-day period of exclusivity, which will allow both parties to exchange information and maintain confidentiality as each party seeks to determine whether mutually beneficial business opportunities may exist. The LOI does not represent a change of business for the Company. The LOI contains no terms of compensation, and does not contemplate a definitive agreement between the parties.

In November 2012, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (“WSLCB”) passed Initiative 502 (“I-502”) pursuant to a vote by the people of the State of Washington. I-502 authorized the WSLCB to regulate and tax recreational marijuana products for persons over twenty-one years of age and thereby created a new industry for the growing, processing and selling of Washington State-regulated recreational marijuana products. A recent WSLCB commissioned report by the Rand organization suggests that there are currently up to 650,000 recreational marijuana users in Washington State, worth approximately USD $1.25 – $1.5 Billion in annual sales.

Honu Inc. began legally selling cannabis products into the Washington market in April 2015. In 2016, Honu was honoured as having the “Best Cannabis Brand Design 2016” in an online poll published by the Marijuana Business Association (MJBA). In the same year, its Coconut Snowballs were chosen as the best sweet edible recreational cannabis product.

King County Council Chair: Council’s Vote Continues Inequitable Location Of Marijuana Facilities

WASHINGTON:  Metropolitan King County Council Chair Joe McDermott, joined by Council member Larry Gossett, released this statement after the passage of legislation limiting the production, processing and retail of marijuana in the unincorporated areas of King County:

“The legislation will further concentrate retail marijuana stores in low income and working class neighborhoods, and, more often than not, minority neighborhoods.“Reducing the land area where marijuana can be grown and processed coupled with no guaranteed expansion of retail stores will also result in limited access across our county.

“This is particularly concerning for our residents who use medical marijuana to treat numerous ailments like seizures, arthritis and Crohn’s Disease.“For these reasons, we voted against the legislation.

“Moving forward, the County must look for ways to ensure adequate access to recreational and medical marijuana. We must also address any unintended consequences this legislation may create.

“King County residents voted for a workable, legal marijuana system. We must do the work to make this happen.”

Saying Goodbye To Medical Cannabis In Washington State

By TwicebakedinWA

There are less than two weeks left before new medical cannabis regulations go into effect in Washington State. For those of us who get our cannabis medicine from the current system that patients have been using since the 90’s, this is a big change nobody is looking forward to.

As I was driving out to MMJ Universe in Black Diamond this past Saturday I found tears streaming down my face thinking about this being one of the last times I would be making that sweet drive in the country to spend time shopping for cannabis in an open market environment.

I’ve been feeling a touch reminiscent about my times out at that specific market where I have met hundreds of patients and growers. Through regular market visits and attending events held there I have been able to plug in with the cannabis community.

I started going there before the adult use of cannabis was legalized in Washington State and I have been able to observe an evolution that the market has taken not only with how beautiful the grounds have become but also to how the market itself has changed over the years.

When I first started attending the market almost every table had a bong or pipe set up so you could sample their products right there. When you walked in the doors it was often a little cloudy and everybody was relaxed with their with cannabis. This was a unique shopping experience, very new to me, and very refreshing to be around. Eventually the smoking was moved outside and while that mildly changed the experience, the freedom felt and education given to patients at the market continued.

When I talked to Diedre, the owner of MMJ Universe, she said she is planning a big celebration on the 30th of June with music and vending to shed some happiness despite how sad so many of us are to be losing our beloved market.

I have much to celebrate from the gains that I have received from that market and even as the tears again roll down my face thinking that it is closing all I can do is thank Diedre and everybody involved in keeping the market going for so long and for focusing on positives and solutions at the end of this medical cannabis era.

Legal Cannabis Marketers Carefully Sell Their Wares

WASHINGTON:  While marketing quality cannabis to eager consumers may seem like simple stuff, licensed cannabis marketers are tasked with operating under strict regulatory guidelines, and must stay diligent or risk the wrath of both federal and state regulators.  The Federal Trade Commission is the overseer of advertising in the US, and that includes Washington State’s I-502 legal cannabis industry, while the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (WSLCB) and the Attorney General are the industry enforcers. Advertising is one of the few areas of regulation that is stricter in Washington State than in other recreational cannabis states.

The WSLCB has increasingly been focusing it’s actions on product packaging and internet marketing, and in response the Marijuana Business Association has invited leading cannabis industry attorneys Aaron Pelley and Anne van Leynseele of NWMJ Law to present ‘the dos and don’ts of marketing, advertising, packaging’ to an audience of producers, processors, retailers, and a diverse group of ancillary business owners at the HOT BOX: The Best in Marijuana Design and Packaging 2016  seminar on June 2nd in Tacoma, Washington.

“We will start with an overview of the constitutional rights; making the important distinction that advertising is not considered free speech so it can be regulated,” Anne van Leynseele told MJNN. “Building the foundation that the principle concepts of advertising and marketing law include truth in advertising and avoiding unfair trade practices. The Constitution is also the basis for Intellectual Property laws and the often misunderstood difference between assets that can be protected and those that cannot.”

NWMJ Law’s featured presentation will include advice that every business marketing cannabis brands on the internet and social media needs to know.  including Encouraging each business owner to carefully assess their compliance with for example: compliant packaging, proper signage on retail premises, displaying their valid license, and including mandatory warnings on ads.an update on the pending changes on labeling, as well the general principles, protective strategies, and our insights about what is happening in this critical and subjective aspect of the cannabis industry.

Advance Tickets on sale here:

City of Castle Rock, WA Proposes Moratorium On Marijuana And Cannabis-Infused Products

WASHINGTON: Castle Rock, WA, which calls itself the “Gateway to Mt. St. Helens” has proposed a moratorium prohibiting the retail sale, growing, production, and processing of marijuana and cannabis-infused products intended for medical and/or recreational use within the Castle Rock city limits for a one-year period of time, during which the city will study regulatory options and may propose amendments.

A public hearing, in accordance with RCW 35A.63.220, has been scheduled for April 25th, 2016 at 7:30PM at the former Exhibit Hall Building, 147 Front Ave. SW, Castle Rock, WA.

Comments may be mailed in advance to Deborah Johnson, City Planner, c/o Cowlitz-Wahkiakum Council of Governments, Administration Annex, 207 Fourth Ave N., Kelso, WA 98616-4195; or emailed to: djohnson@cwcog.org. Advance comments must be received by 5PM on April 25, 2016.  Written comments may also be submitted in person through the close of the hearing.