4 Plants You Need To Grow In 2020 To Make Big Money

We all need to make money to survive. Some ways of making money are more comfortable when compared to others. If you’re someone who wouldn’t like to work a nine-hour shift to bring home money, then this article is perfect for you. Allow us to apprise you of 4 plants you can grow in your backyard or garden that will help you win your bread and butter with no hardship involved.

Mushrooms

Mushrooms are not only delicious but very profitable too. The two most famous gourmet mushrooms that are lucrative are shiitake and oyster. These two mushrooms can be found in markets, both dry and fresh. A great advantage is that you can grow these two exotic mushrooms in your home without the need for fertile soil. You can grow them on waste products like sawdust or coffee grounds. Fortunately, it only takes 6-8 weeks for the mushrooms to mature. Hence you can earn quickly off them. Currently, these gourmet mushrooms for $7 a pound. This will equal to $17,000 in a 10×10 space! Imagine making such an income from growing fungi right at home.

Marijuana

Marijuana is probably equivalent in status to the ‘rose.’ Everyone knows about it, and everyone has a love for it. Believe it or not, people are growing marijuana at home. Marijuana can earn you some big money. One reason is that you can sell it or use it for your own recreational or medicinal benefit. There are several strains of marijuana, as well. We suggest you plant a strain at home that is high in demand, such as OG Kush, Pineapple Express, Bruce Banner, White Widow, Orange Sherbet, and more. Visit the ILGM blog to get to know more about how to grow marijuana at home.

Any or Every Herb

Herbs have been used for thousands of years for medicinal purposes. Herbs like thyme, cardamom, cumin, coriander, rosemary, basil, and many more are viral. These herbs are used in Indian, Italian, Moroccan, and Latin American cuisines so you can imagine their popularity. Without these herbs, the savory taste of dishes belonging to each cuisine will not be the same. Apart from cooking, herbs are excellent in providing medicinal benefits. For example, lavender is used in aromatherapy since it promotes wellness and calmness. Start by growing oregano, parsley, basil, and mint in your garden or kitchen since they are the easiest to grow.

Garlic

Garlic has voted in the top 10 most sought after vegetables in the world. Now you shouldn’t grow just any garlic in your backyard – you need to grow ‘gourmet garlic.’ Gourmet garlics have bulbs that are uniform in shape and large in size. There are three types of gourmet garlic: rocambole, purple stripe, and porcelain. The flavor of such garlic is savory, which explains why they are in demand in fancy restaurants. This intense flavor also sets them apart from the ordinary garlic. Growing such garlic in your home can help you make $8-$10 per pound!

 

Guam: Governor Signs Home Grow Legislation Into Law

GUAM: The Governor for the US territory of Guam has signed legislation permitting qualified medical cannabis patients and their caregivers the ability to grow personal use amounts of cannabis at home.

Under the new law, applicants can apply to the Department of Health and Social Services to receive a home cultivation permit. Approved applicants may grow up to six mature plants and/or 12 immature plants.

Voters in 2014 approved a ballot measure establishing a medical cannabis program. Under the program, patients with cancer, PTSD, epilepsy, and other qualifying conditions are eligible to obtain cannabis from licensed dispensaries. However, to date, no such facilities are up and running.

Lawmakers say that allowing patients the option to grow marijuana at home is an “interim solution” to address the government’s failure to move the program forward in an expeditious manner.


For more information, contact Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at (202) 483-5500.

South Africa: Highest Court Upholds Right To Consume Marijuana In Private

SOUTH AFRICA: The nation’s highest court has upheld a 2017 decision finding that the use of marijuana by adults in private is constitutionally protected behavior.

Judges unanimously ruled that privacy protections encompass an adult’s right to possess and grow cannabis in a private space. It is not “a criminal offense for an adult to use or be in possession of cannabis in private for his or her personal consumption,” the court determined.

Public cannabis use and marijuana sales remain prohibited under the ruling.

South African politicians first outlawed marijuana in 1908. Annually, some 13 percent of all arrests in the nation are marijuana-related.


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org or NORML Political Director, Justin Strekal, at (202) 483-5500.

Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board To Hold Public Hearing On Recreational Marijuana Home Grows

Agency tasked by new law to conduct study and make recommendations to Legislature by Dec. 1, 1017

WASHINGTON:  The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (WSLCB) will hold a public hearing on Wed. Oct. 4, 2017, to receive public input on whether the State should allow home grows of recreational marijuana. The public hearing is during the regularly scheduled 10:00 a.m. Board meeting at its headquarters at 3000 Pacific Avenue in Olympia. Due to space and parking restrictions, the WSLCB encourages written public comment. Written public comment may be submitted by email through Oct. 11, 2017 at rules@lcb.wa.gov or hard copy at PO Box 43080, Olympia, WA 98504.

Note: The Board may adjust the testimony time allotted to each speaker based on the number of attendees to ensure that everyone has time to testify. 

Legislation enacted in 2017 directs the WSLCB to “conduct a study of regulatory options for the legalization of marijuana plant possession and cultivation by recreational marijuana users.” The study must take into account the “Cole Memo,” issued by the United State Department of Justice in 2013, which outlines the federal government’s enforcement priorities in states where medical or recreational marijuana has been legalized or decriminalized. The study and recommendations are due to the Legislature on Dec. 1, 2017

“The agency is actively engaging other states, the public, the industry and stakeholders. We know there are many perspectives to this issue and we want to ensure they are captured for our report and recommendations,” said agency director Rick Garza.

The WSLCB is seeking input on three options at the public hearing:

Option 1: Tightly Regulated Recreational Marijuana Home Grows

  • Statutory provision that allows law enforcement to seize and destroy all plants if beyond limit;
  • This option allows recreational home grows under a strict state regulatory framework based on the Cole Memo:
  • Requires a permit;
  • Four plants maximum per household;
  • All plants must be entered into the state traceability system;
  • Requirements for security, preventing youth access, preventing diversion, etc.;
  • Jurisdiction is shared between WSLCB and local authorities
  • Allows recreational growers to purchase plants from licensed as long as growers have a permit;
  • Same restrictions on processing marijuana that apply to medical marijuana (no combustible processing).

Option 2: Local Control of Recreational Marijuana Home Grows

  • This option is based on statewide standards including requirements for security, preventing youth access, preventing diversion, etc.;
  • Limits plants to 4 per household;
  • Allows recreational growers to purchase plants from licensed as long as growers have a permit.
  • Requires a permit to possess plants.

Difference from Option 1

  • Does not require plants to be entered into traceability
  • Authorized, controlled, and enforced by local jurisdictions;
  • State sets minimum requirements. Local jurisdictions can be more restrictive.
  • Home grows are prohibited without local permission;

Option 3. Recreational Home Grows are Prohibited

  • This option preserves the status quo. Recreational home grows continue to remain prohibited:
  • A regulated market exists today with statewide access;
  • Recreational home grows may provide a cover for diversion;
  • The Cole Memo is concerned with diversion, youth access, and the criminal element;
  • Home grows for medical marijuana are allowed as well as cooperatives.

Among the eight states that have legalized recreational marijuana, Washington is the only state that does not allow marijuana home grows. Washington allows authorized patients to have limited grows for medical purposes or to be part of a four-member medical marijuana cooperative if the cooperative registers with the WSLCB and the local jurisdiction does not object.

Those wishing to view the public hearing may watch via WebEx. The live link will be posted to the Board Meeting webpage of the WSLCB website at lcb.wa.gov at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting.

Colorado Set To Prohibit Marijuana Co-Op Growing Operations

By Kristen Wyatt, Associated Press

COLORADO: Colorado was set Monday to outlaw marijuana growing co-ops soon after the state Senate unanimously approved a bill making it a crime for people to cultivate recreational pot for other people.

The bill supported by the office of Gov. John Hickenlooper passed 35-0 but it was unclear when he would sign it. There are no state estimates on how many collective recreational marijuana growing operations exist in Colorado, though they are popular among users who share the cost of electricity, water and fertilizer to grow their pot.

Colorado legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, but it has a nagging black-market problem. Law enforcement and state lawmakers attribute the black-market problem in part to weak restrictions on who can grow pot.

The Colorado state constitution authorizes people over 21 to grow their own pot, or to assist someone else in growing pot. That language allows groups to designate a single “farmer” to care for their marijuana plants, allowing them to avoid pot taxes that approach 30 percent, depending on the jurisdiction.

But police groups and Hickenlooper, a Democrat, have called on lawmakers to curb the practice of assisting other recreational pot users.

The bill had already passed the House.  The governor plans to sign another bill this week in the state’s pot crackdown. It limits the number of marijuana plants that can be grown in a home to 12 plants, which would force medical marijuana users authorized to grow more than 12 plants to grow it in agricultural or commercial locations or to buy it from dispensaries that tax marijuana.

Hickenlooper plans to sign that bill this week, his office said.  The bill passed Monday also provides $6 million a year in marijuana tax revenues to give law enforcement agencies more money to investigate illegal pot growing operations.

Grow-less In Seattle: A Tale Of Two Home Growing Bills

By Bailey Hirschburg

WASHINGTON: If you’ve been following legalization in Washington,  you probably know that we’re the only one of the eight legal states (plus the District of Columbia) that does not allow adults to grow their own cannabis at home.

Initiative 502’s authors decided to drop home grow, in an effort to broaden its appeal. Washington’s initiative passed in 2012 with 56% of the vote — the same as Colorado whose law includes personal cultivation — a missed opportunity.

In the years that followed, political action in Olympia focused first on setting up the first crop of licensed growers, processors, and retailers. Then, legislators turned their attention to reforming the state’s medical marijuana laws, eliminating largely unregulated collectives in favor of registered co-ops, and offering the largest cannabis gardens and biggest retail discounts to patients registered with Washington’s Department of Health.

Nearly four and a half years after Washington picked a new approach to personal cannabis use,  we’re only now talking about personal cultivation and so there was a lot of anticipation coming into the Commerce and Gaming Committee’s hearings on house bills 1092 and 1212 last Monday. The two home grow bills are basically the same, both legalizing cultivation for adults 21 and older. HB1092, sponsored by Rep. Sherry Appleton (D-23rd), has been discussed and promoted more in the greener corners of the internet.

Appleton has been supportive of cannabis reform for several years, and is known as a genuine ally. Her bill is short and straightforward, and allows houses with more than one person over 21 to have up to 12 plants while retaining up to 48 ounces of harvested cannabis. Based solely on plant count, its easy to call Appleton’s bill the best one.

But HB1212, sponsored by Rep. Brian Blake (D-19th), while allowing only 6 plants and 24 ounces per house, has some benefits Appleton’s bill lacks. First, it legalizes sharing and gifting of cannabis between adults, a little-enforced, but still felony offense in the state. Blake’s bill would also allow adults, patients, and caregivers to contract with laboratories directly to have their cannabis plants scientifically tested for potency and contaminants. Both sharing and individual testing would benefit patients and recreational growers.

HB1212 also restructures possession offenses for cannabis generally, possession of more than six plants but less than 18 would be a civil infraction for every excess plant. Over 18 plants is a misdemeanor, and 40 or more is a felony.

Rep. Blake’s legislation has two more benefits, first, Blake sits on the Commerce and Gaming Committee, well positioned to push for its passage. The second is more speculative, but when there are two bills dealing with cannabis, I’ve found he conservatively worded is more likely to gain support.

At Monday’s hearing many of those speaking in support were patients and their families. Also present were cannabis licensees and industry representatives. Those speaking in opposition were Rick Garza from Washington’s Liquor and Cannabis Board and Seth Dawson representing Washington Association for Substance Abuse Prevention.

As a lobbyist for Washington NORML PAC, I was the only person to testify as a recreational consumer and prospective grower. My argument was similar to those made by others: the rest of the legal states already allow for home grow; it keeps police resources focused on large scale trafficking and violent crime; and most of us won’t be Cannabis Cup level master growers.

But I made one more argument that no one else did. Section 7 of our state constitution reads “No person shall be disturbed in his private affairs, or his home invaded, without authority of law.” Maybe the state once had a valid interest in violating homes for a plant, I said, but not when voters rejected prohibition. You don’t have to like cannabis to agree that our constitution thinks the homes and affairs of its citizens should be sacred.

Following the hearing several committee members said they were interested in passing one of the bills, a republican member said he was more likely to support 1212 than 1092. If the majority of the committee votes “Do Pass” on either bill it will advance to another committee, eventually having to pass the house, and do the whole process again in the state senate.

No state has legalized personal cultivation outside of the ballot box, so just making the case to one committee in one chamber of the legislature brings Washington one step closer to making cannabis history.

Watch the hearing on TVW:

Contact members of the Commerce and Gaming Committee here and urge passage of either HB1092 or HB1212.

  • David.Sawyer@leg.wa.gov
  • Shelley.Kloba@leg.wa.gov
  • Cary.Condotta@leg.wa.gov
  • Brandon.Vick@leg.wa.gov
  • Andrew.Barkis@leg.wa.gov
  • Brian.Blake@leg.wa.gov
  • Jessyn.Farrell@leg.wa.gov
  • Bill.Jenkin@leg.wa.gov
  • Steve.Kirby@leg.wa.gov
  • Cindy.Ryu@leg.wa.gov
  • Jesse.Young@leg.wa.gov

 

You’re Ready To Grow Your Own Pot, Travel Guru Rick Steves Says

WASHINGTON: Rick Steves doesn’t think Big Marijuana should control your pot. That’s one reason people in Washington state should be able to grow their own weed, Steves told KUOW’s Jeannie Yandel.

“I don’t want marijuana to go the route of tobacco and have Joe Camel and Big Tobacco and Big Marijuana” dominate the industry, Steves said. “If there’s money to be made, it’s going to attract big corporate interests and they’re going to have the clout. I like the idea of having home grow because it gives people an option to having to buy something from a giant organization. They can just have a few plants on the window sill, and it’s not a big deal.”

The host of Travels With Rick Steves was a big supporter of the state’s original marijuana initiative, I-502, which passed in 2012 and took effect last year. Now he supports a proposal to allow people to grow six of their own marijuana plants. It could be considered next year in the state Legislature.

New Medical Marijuana Rule About To Face Lawsuit

CANADA: Longtime Fraser Valley marijuana crusader John Conroy is finalizing a lawsuit accusing Ottawa of infringing on the rights of medical pot users and growers.

He and a handful of other lawyers working on the lawsuit to be filed in Federal Court within weeks have reviewed more than 3,000 victim impact statements from across the country to pick the 15 best representatives. [Read more…]