Isodiol To Acquire California Hemp Farm Farmtiva

CANADA:  Isodiol International Inc., a global CBD innovator specializing in the development of pharmaceutical and health and wellness products, has announced that it has entered into a binding agreement to acquire 51% of Farmtiva, a cultivator of hemp with operations in California that provides hemp farming and distribution support for farmers and other industry participants.

Farmtiva has an exclusive partnership agreement with the not-for-profit group, Imperial Valley Conservation Research Center, and together they anticipate planting the first California hemp crop within the next three weeks. This project will be a first in California for hemp legally grown under the Agricultural Act of 2014 § 7606 (“2014 Farm Bill”) in California.  As an “established agricultural research institution,” under Food and Agricultural Code (FAC) Section 81000, the project is exempt from registration and may currently grow industrial hemp in California.

California defines the rules under which hemp may be grown in Division 24 of the California Food and Agricultural Code. However, California has yet to establish a mechanism by which a farmer may grow industrial hemp pursuant to local registrations that have not yet been established. Therefore, Farmtiva and Isodiol believe they are the first group to cultivate legally grown hemp in California for more than only fiber and oil seeds.

Hemp Pioneer and Farmtiva CEO, Chris Boucher said, “This partnership enables us to operate an industrial hemp research and grow operation on the grounds of the former U.S. Department of Agriculture research facility, creating new jobs and investments in the community.” The facility consists of 160 acres, with 140 acres divided into small research plots that are leased to clients including Farmtiva. In addition to the research plots, the center houses five greenhouses and a soil testing laboratory.

This is a historical moment in California hemp history, as Boucher grew a hemp crop at the same facility in 1994 when it was operated with the USDA. “We have waited over 24 years for the laws to change and now we are very excited to move California’s agriculture hemp future forward, said Boucher.”

“Farmtiva is committed to the research and development of industrial hemp, and with the IVCRC partnership, the goal is to develop a complete industrial hemp business model whereby commercialization opportunities will be implemented to ensure use of all of the hemp by-products after CBD extraction is completed, said CEO of Isodiol, Marcos Agramont

Under the terms of this agreement, Isodiol will issue Farmtiva $1,050,000 USD in stock based on the closing price April 30th, 2018, subject to 36-month escrow guidelines, and based on Farmtiva implementing the contract rights set forth in the outstanding memorandum of understanding with IVCRC.

 

North Carolina Farmers Race To Plant Industrial Hemp aka “Carolina Gold”

NORTH CAROLINA: North Carolina farmers are picking up the pace in planting what they believe will be the next cash crop… industrial hemp. The “Carolina Gold,” as one North Carolina fourth generation farmer referred to industrial hemp, is expected to bring in a huge potential source of income among farmers in the state. Thus far, Hemp, Inc.’s licensed farming associates in North Carolina have secured over 150 pounds of CBD-rich hemp seeds which are currently being planted in order to be harvested by September/October. CEO of Hemp, Inc. Bruce Perlowin says that amount of CBD-rich hemp seeds along with the 17 acres of high-CBD clones they are planting in North Carolina and Colorado will be one of, or, the largest CBD hemp grows in the United States (approximately 550 acres total).

“Since North Carolina farmers can source domestic seed for planting industrial hemp, it’s almost a race in the Tar Heel state to see who can get the seeds and the clones in the ground first. Everyone wants to try their hand at the lucrative crop. And with Hemp, Inc.’s Hemp University educational symposiums, teaching farmers how to grow hemp for profit, the learning curve isn’t as massive as it once was,” said Perlowin.

As announced in Hemp, Inc.’s last press release, the company has already purchased its first industrial NuAxon Tech CO2 Supercritical extractor from NuAxon BioScience, the manufacturer and producer of the world class, large capacity CO2 Supercritical Extraction equipment. With the industry’s expanding CBD market and ever-increasing consumer CBD sales over the past few years, executives are set to purchase its second CBD Extractor this year as well. The Hemp Business Journal projects the CBD market will “grow to a $2.1 billion market in consumer sales by 2020 with $450-million of those sales coming from hemp-based sources.” David Schmitt, COO of Hemp, Inc.’s wholly owned subsidiary, Industrial Hemp Manufacturing, LLC (IHM), has been researching CBD extraction methods and manufacturers for the past 2 years and feels confident Hemp, Inc. will greatly benefit from the in-house CBD extraction method.

Ohio Residents Join Legal Hemp Harvest In Kentucky, Touting Jobs Creation, Brain Food

OHIO:  For the first time in two generations, the Industrial Hemp crop has been legally harvested in Kentucky. The hemp plots were grown in compliance with Kentucky state law and in accordance with Sec. 7606 of the 2014 US Farm Bill (Agricultural Act of 2014) that authorized hemp cultivation for research purposes in states that permit Hemp farming.

The agricultural excitement spurred some of Ohio’s long-time hemp advocates to travel south to meet the farmers and gain first-hand experience with the plant that cannabis prohibition has kept out of American fields until very recently. In votes often favoring Hemp by wide margins, 20 states have legalized the crop, defining it as Cannabis Sativa L., having .03 percent THC or less (no drug/narcotic value). The reforms are welcome in Kentucky, where tobacco growers are hurting for alternative crops.

Even with the non-drug status being declared federally, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) seized viable hemp seed en route to Kentucky from Italy, as outdated policy under the Controlled Substances Act doesn’t recognize the scientifically-demonstrated chemical distinctions between “marihuana,” a Schedule I narcotic, and hemp, a viable agricultural cash crop commodity. Kentucky sued the DEA to release the seeds, and prevailed in federal court, allowing the research plots to proceed.

The Ohio Hemp Chamber of Commerce (OHCC), which planned the Kentucky hemp farm tour for its members, sees the DEA actions as more motivation to clear up the lingering misunderstandings about the ancient crop. For Jeremy Koosed, owner of Plant Kingdom Bakery in Lyndhurst, Ohio, clarifying the non-drug status is an urgent matter.