Key Dates On Road To Legal Medical Marijuana In Illinois

ILLINOIS: The road to legal medical marijuana in Illinois began more than a decade ago, when proponents first began pushing legislation in Springfield. After many defeats, a law establishing a pilot program was approved in 2013.

Here are key dates since the law was passed:

  • Aug. 1, 2013: Gov. Pat Quinn, a Democrat, signs the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Act, making Illinois the 21st state allowing marijuana for medical use. The law authorizes a four-year pilot program that expires at the end of 2017.
  • July 15, 2014: A legislative committee approves the program’s rules for patients, growers and retailers. Public comments from patients, entrepreneurs and city officials helped shape the rules.
  • Jan. 1, 2015: A law takes effect expanding the pilot program to allow children to be prescribed non-smokable forms of marijuana.

Costs Adding Up For Illinois Medical Marijuana Entrepreneurs

ILLINOIS: In the world of medical marijuana entrepreneurs in Illinois, there’s plenty of green behind the grass.

Hundreds of would-be medical marijuana growers and sellers have put millions of dollars on the line hoping for coveted state permits that were supposed to issued by former Gov. Pat Quinn by the end of last year.

To snag those valuable permits, the entrepreneurs hired consultants, lawyers and lobbyists.

They’re already paying rent, in some cases, or have money tied up in options to buy property.

And now, they wait.  And with millions of dollars on the line, waiting can get expensive.

Rauner On Medical Marijuana: “I’m Concerned About the Process”

ILLINOIS:  A day after outgoing governor Pat Quinn tossed the medical marijuana hot potato to his successor Bruce Rauner, the new governor gave only the vaguest description of how he plans to proceed with the program.

After vowing to complete the licensing process for growers and sellers by year’s end, the Quinn administration failed to issue any licenses, leaving the job to Rauner, who publicly ridiculed the medical marijuana program during the campaign.

“I’m concerned about the process,” Rauner said today during a signing ceremony in Springfield. “I don’t think it’s been run well.

“I expressed my concern during the campaign, that it looked like some folks had left the administration,” he said. “They were playing lobbying roles, they were working with some of their friends to get some of these contracts.”

Illinois Govenor Passes On Medical Marijuana

ILLINOIS:  In the wake of Gov. Pat Quinn’s exit from office Monday, Sneed has learned he will NOT give a green light to Illinois license applications to cultivate and distribute medical marijuana — and will toss a safety wrench into the marijuana mix.

Sneed has also learned Gov. Quinn, who had been urging caution in the state’s medical marijuana process, will sign legislation Monday to further tighten the new medical marijuana laws.

Under the changes Quinn is signing into law, the Department of Agriculture will have the power not only to revoke marijuana growers’ licenses, but also to suspend them.

Quinn will also announce the first dozen appointments to the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board, which will ultimately have 16 members, including patients and doctors.

City Introduces Framework For Medical Marijuana In Chicago

ILLINOIS: The Chicago City Council laid the zoning framework for medical marijuana dispensaries during its Tuesday meeting. If you thought they would make it easy to obtain some legal kush remember this is Chicago and you’ll be reminded that, while Illinois became the 20th state to legalize cannabis, not everyone approves.

The measure introduced at Tuesday’s meeting calls for medical marijuana dispensaries and cultivation centers to be allowed in planned manufacturing districts. The dispensaries and growing centers would also be required to secure special-use permits from the Zoning Board of Appeals and establish minimum spaces based on facility size. Chicago would also decriminalize medical marijuana under the ordinance; it already writes tickets to people caught with small amounts of pot.

The requirement to go before the Zoning Board of Appeals for special-use permits would allow area residents to object to having a dispensary in their vicinity. The recommendations proposed by the City Council Department of Planning and Development is in addition to the state law.

Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation allowing for medical marijuana in August. Billed as one of the toughest decriminalization laws in the nation, it calls for a four-year pilot program of 22 cultivation centers and 60 dispensaries where patients could buy marijuana after getting a prescription from a doctor with whom they have an existing relationship. The legislation sets a 2.5 ounce limit per patient per purchase.

City Introduces Framework For Medical Marijuana In Chicago

ILLINOIS: The Chicago City Council laid the zoning framework for medical marijuana dispensaries during its Tuesday meeting. If you thought they would make it easy to obtain some legal kush remember this is Chicago and you’ll be reminded that, while Illinois became the 20th state to legalize cannabis, not everyone approves.

The measure introduced at Tuesday’s meeting calls for medical marijuana dispensaries and cultivation centers to be allowed in planned manufacturing districts. The dispensaries and growing centers would also be required to secure special-use permits from the Zoning Board of Appeals and establish minimum spaces based on facility size. Chicago would also decriminalize medical marijuana under the ordinance; it already writes tickets to people caught with small amounts of pot.

The requirement to go before the Zoning Board of Appeals for special-use permits would allow area residents to object to having a dispensary in their vicinity. The recommendations proposed by the City Council Department of Planning and Development is in addition to the state law.

Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation allowing for medical marijuana in August. Billed as one of the toughest decriminalization laws in the nation, it calls for a four-year pilot program of 22 cultivation centers and 60 dispensaries where patients could buy marijuana after getting a prescription from a doctor with whom they have an existing relationship. The legislation sets a 2.5 ounce limit per patient per purchase.