NJ Lawmakers Holding Hearing On Legalizing Marijuana

NEW JERSEY: New Jersey lawmakers are set to hear testimony on legalizing recreational marijuana in the state.

The judiciary committee is scheduled on Monday to hear from clergy, health professionals, law enforcement officials and other policy experts on Monday.

The hearing comes as lawmakers prepare for a lame-duck session of the Legislature and as Gov. Chris Christie spends time outside New Jersey campaigning for the Republican nomination for president.

Chris Christie’s Claim That He ‘Supported And Implemented’ New Jersey’s Medical Marijuana Laws

NEW JERSEY:  In New Jersey, we have medical marijuana laws, which I supported and implemented. … I’m not against medical marijuana. We do it in New Jersey. But I’m against the recreational use of marijuana.”

— New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R), the second GOP debate, Sept. 16, 2015

Several claims from the second Republican presidential debate stood out to our readers as fishy, such as this one. We fact-checked 18 other claims, including some by Christie, right after that debate, with a deeper looks at statements by Marco Rubio and Carly Fiorina. How accurate is this claim?

The Facts

Christie’s predecessor, Democrat Jon Corzine, signed the New Jersey Compassionate Use of Medical Marijuana Act into law Jan. 10, 2010 — his last day as governor. That left Christie with the responsibility of carrying out the law, which was expected to take effect over six months.

The law made it legal for patients with certain debilitating medical conditions (including cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Lou Gehrig’s disease and any terminal illness where the patient was not expected to live more than a year). It gave the state health department authority to write regulations for the medical marijuana program.

When campaigning for governor, Christie said he supported medical marijuana in a limited scope for certain patients. But he criticized the law for not being tough enough, and said he wanted to see it “tightened up a little bit.”

Marijuana Laws Pose Dilemma For Republican Presidential Hopefuls

NEW JERSEY:  New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie‘s response in a recent radio interview to a question about legal marijuana was in keeping with his tough-on-crime persona.

A former prosecutor and potential presidential candidate, Christie has long been a staunch opponent of pot, at one time lambasting tax revenue generated from the sale of legal recreational marijuana as “blood money.”

“I will crack down and not permit it,” he told radio host Hugh Hewitt, who had asked whether legal marijuana sales in Colorado and Washington state should be allowed. “Marijuana is an illegal drug under federal law. And the states should not be permitted to sell it and profit from it.”

Christie’s comments put him on the conservative end of the divide over marijuana among both declared and likely Republican candidates for president, one that goes far beyond whether they’ve ever inhaled. Each of the current and prospective members of the GOP field opposes full legalization of marijuana, although they differ somewhat on medicinal use.

Chris Christie: ‘I Will Crack Down And Not Permit’ Legal Marijuana As President

NEW JERSEY:  If New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) becomes president of the United States, he said on “The Hugh Hewitt Show” Tuesday, he will “crack down” on those states that have ended prohibitions on marijuana.

When asked by Hewitt if he would enforce federal drug laws in those states that have legalized and regulated cannabis, Christie responded unequivocally.

“Absolutely,” Christie said. “I will crack down and not permit it.”

Citing an “enormous addiction problem” in the U.S., Christie, who has not yet announced a presidential run but has launched a political action committee, said that a very clear message needs to be sent “from the White House on down through federal law enforcement.”

 

Lawmakers Want To Rebuke Christie Over Medical Marijuana

NEW JERSEY:  The New Jersey Assembly may rebuke the Christie administration’s handling of the state’s medical marijuana program.

Lawmakers are scheduled to vote Thursday on a resolution that says Gov. Chris Christie’s Health Department has placed “arbitrary and unnecessary” restrictions on the program.

The vote comes just a day after Christie criticized the notion of legalizing marijuana in order to gain a tax windfall, calling it “blood money.”

Lawmakers contend administration regulations, like requiring doctors who prescribe marijuana to register on public lists, hurt the program.

Fox Slams NJ Gov Chris Christie’s Pot Brutality and Ignorance

NEW JERSEY: Though Fox news is more or less consistently prohibitionist, Fox correspondent Greg Gutfeld gets it right and shames thuggish Governor Chris Christie on his refusal to stop destroying innocent – and mostly minority – people’s lives for choosing a safer buzz than alcohol.

 

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries?list=PLWgO_qyMJotzYKWiqdYYwHzcs6o63R9wq]

Colorado Governor Responds To New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s Criticism Of State’s Pot Laws

COLORADO: Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper is responding to New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s criticism of Colorado for its pot shops and legalized marijuana.

Monday, Christie was asked on a New Jersey radio station about legalizing marijuana. He responded, “For the people who are enamored with the idea with the income, the tax revenue from this, go to Colorado and see if you want to live there.”

Hickenlooper defended Colorado and said many people want to live here.

“A lot of people think Colorado is great place to live, work and play. Plus, we have a pretty awesome quality of life. But don’t take our just our word for it … for example:

America’s Top States for Business
# 7 Colorado
#42 New Jersey

Chris Christie Says He Opposes Bill To Legalize Marijuana In NJ

NEW JERSEY:  Weeks after a state senator introduced a bill that would make the sale and possession of marijuana legal in New Jersey, Gov. Chris Christie emphasized today that he is opposed to any effort to legalize pot in the state.

“I’m not going to do that on my watch,” the Republican governor told a crowd of about 500 people — including dozens of students — at Winston Churchill Elementary School. “I’m just not. I don’t think it’s the right thing to do for our state.”

Last month, state Sen. Nicholas Scutari (D-Union) introduced legislation that would regulate the growth, possession, and sale of recreational marijuana with an aim toward stemming the illegal drug market and provide new tax revenue.

New Jersey Cannabis Reformer Governor Vetoes Industrial Hemp Bill

By Michael Chazukow 

NEW JERSEY:  Most cameras in Trenton were fixed on Governor Christie’s scandal hearings last week.   The “Bridge-gate” controversy as well as allegations that he misused Sandy Relief funds has been so dominant in the news that the excellent work of our legislature was being overlooked.  Controversy hearings dominated our capitol last week, and the Governor’s second term inauguration events were also well covered.  So as usual, mainstream media was too pre-occupied to report Chris Christie’s actions to double-down on our state’s draconian cannabis laws.

Last week, two cannabis reform bills were passed through the NJ Legislature:  S1220 would have “required registered qualifying patient’s authorized use of medical marijuana to be considered equivalent to use of any other prescribed medication and not the use of an illicit substance that would otherwise disqualify a qualifying patient from needed medical care, including organ transplants.” [Read more…]

NJ Gov. Chris Christie Calls War On Drugs 'A Failure'

NEW JERSEY:  New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has become the latest leader to condemn the now 40-year-old war on drugs.

“The war on drugs, while well-intentioned, has been a failure,” Christie said Monday during a speech at The Brookings Institution. “We’re warehousing addicted people everyday in state prisons in New Jersey, giving them no treatment.”

Christie stressed the merits of legislation recently passed by New Jersey state lawmakers that institutes a year of mandatory treatment for first-time, nonviolent drug offenders instead of jail time. The mandatory treatment program, slated to be put in place in at least three counties during its first year, will eventually expand statewide over the next five years.

Christie, one of the few Republican lawmakers to actively speak out against the effects of America’s drug war policies, sought to put a conservative moral spin on his position.