Study: CBD Effective As Adjunctive Therapy For Schizophrenia

UNITED KINGDOM: The daily administration of CBD (cannabidiol) as an adjunctive therapy mitigates psychotic symptoms in patients with schizophrenia, according to clinical trial data published online ahead of print in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

British researchers assessed the adjunctive use of CBD compared to placebo over a six-week period in a randomized trial of 88 schizophrenic patients. Participants ingested 1000mg of plant-derived CBD per day in addition to their conventional medications.

Subjects in the CBD treatment group “had lower levels of positive psychotic symptoms and were more likely to have been rated as improved and as not severely unwell by the treating clinician” at the conclusion of the trial. CBD administration was also associated with “improvements in cognitive performance and in the level of overall functioning,” although these changes did not reach statistical significance.

“These findings suggest that CBD has beneficial effects in patients with schizophrenia,” authors concluded. “As CBD’s effects do not appear to depend on dopamine receptor antagonism, this agent may represent a new class of treatment for the disorder.”

Results of a prior clinical trial published in the journal Translational Psychiatry determined that CBD is superior to amisulpride, a potent anti-psychotic agent, in mitigating psychotic symptoms in schizophrenic patients.


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Cannabidiol (CBD) as an adjunctive therapy in schizophrenia: A multicenter randomized controlled trial,” appears in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

Marijuana Legalization 2015: United Kingdom Could Legalize Weed After 150,000 Brits Sign Petition

GREAT BRITAIN: United Kingdom lawmakers may consider a bill that would legalize cannabis after an online petition garnered the support of more than 150,000 people. The petition asks for lawmakers to allow the sale, production and use of marijuana.

Petitions that exceed more than 100,000 signatures require a formal response from the government and the House of Commons must consider putting the item to debate. Those which receive the required number of signatures are “almost always debated,” according to the site. The petition, which was introduced last week, has amassed more than 158,000 signatures.

The creator of the petition, James Richard Owen, argues that the U.K. is wasting money by keeping marijuana criminalized. “Legalizing cannabis could bring in £900m in taxes every year, save £400m on policing cannabis and create over 10,000 new jobs,” Owen wrote. He said marijuana is a “substance that is safer than alcohol, and has many uses. It is believed to have been used by humans for over 4000 years, being made illegal in the U.K. in 1925.”