OLCC Notice of Public Hearing: OAR 845-025-5760 Audit, Compliance, And Random Testing

OLCC

OREGON:  OLCC Notice of Public Hearing.

What: OAR 845-025-5760, Audit, Compliance, and Random Testing

When:  2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m., Monday, March 16, 2020

Where: Oregon Liquor Control Commission, 9079 SE McLoughlin Blvd., Portland, OR 97222

Public Notice & Proposed Rule Draft

The national outbreak of e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury (EVALI) has resulted in more than 2,800 hospitalizations and 68 deaths, including 2 deaths in Oregon. At this time neither the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA), nor the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) have determined the cause of the illness outbreak in Oregon. While studies using cases in other states have identified Vitamin E acetate as one likely cause in those states, there is no evidence of Vitamin E acetate being linked to cases in Oregon and the CDC and FDA have not ruled out other potential causes of the illness outbreak.

This rule is needed to assist the OLCC and OHA in the ongoing investigation of the cause of EVALI cases in Oregon as well as to prevent and respond to potential future outbreaks or risks to public safety due to additives, adulterants, microbiological contamination, heavy metals, or other contaminants.

In addition to the recent EVALI outbreak, undisclosed ingredients and additives have been discovered in marijuana products in violation of Commission rules. These ingredients and additives cause public health and safety issues and decrease transparency for members of the public using these products. These rule amendments will allow the OLCC to sample the products of marijuana licensees to determine whether they contain ingredients or additives. Further, the ability to randomly test acts as a deterrent and discouraging licensees from making marijuana items with illegal or unknown indigents, additives, solvents or pesticides.

Public comment period ends Sunday, March 22, 2020 at 11:55PM

 

 

 

Centers For Disease Control: Initial State Findings Point To Clinical Similarities In Illnesses Among People Who Use E-cigarettes Or “Vape”

No single product linked to all cases of lung disease

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Initial findings from the investigation into serious lung illnesses associated with e-cigarette products point to clinical similarities among those affected. Patients report similar exposures, symptoms and clinical findings and these align with the CDC health advisory released last week. While many of the patients, but not all, reported recent use of THC-containing products, some reported using both THC- and nicotine-containing products. A smaller group reported using nicotine only.

No evidence of infectious diseases has been identified in these patients, therefore lung illnesses are likely associated with a chemical exposure. However, it is too early to pinpoint a single product or substance common to all cases, according to authors of articles published today in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) and the New England Journal of Medicine.

“We are committed to finding out what is making people sick,” said Robert R. Redfield, MD, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “All available information is being carefully analyzed, and these initial findings are helping us narrow the focus of our investigation and get us closer to the answers needed to save lives.”

CDC, FDA, and state partners are combining information about e-cigarette exposures, results from FDA testing of product samples, and clinical testing results to identify a cause or causes of these illnesses.

“The FDA appreciates the continued collaboration between our federal and state public health partners to get to the bottom of these distressing incidents and gather more information about any products or substances used. We are leaving no stone unturned in following any potential leads and we’re committed to taking appropriate actions as the facts emerge,” said Acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless, M.D. “Our laboratory is working closely with our federal and state partners to identify the products or substances that may be causing the illnesses and have received more than 120 samples from the states so far. The FDA is analyzing these for a broad range of chemicals but no one substance, including Vitamin E acetate, has been identified in all of the samples tested. Importantly, identifying any compounds present in the samples will be one piece of the puzzle but won’t necessarily answer questions about causality, which makes our ongoing work critical.”

CDC launched a multi-state investigation into the lung illnesses on August 1, 2019, and has worked closely since then with FDA, states and other public health partners, and clinicians to determine the cause. As of today, more than 25 states have reported possible cases of lung illnesses associated with use of e-cigarette products (e.g., devices, liquids, refill pods, and cartridges).

At least two deaths have been reported to CDC. Additional cases of lung illness are being investigated to determine whether they are linked to e-cigarette use and have similar clinical features. This includes looking back for older cases based on CDC’s case definition. States are in the process of classifying possible cases, and this information will be reported next week.

What CDC is doing

CDC has created an incident command structure to respond to these illnesses and is working with FDA and states to investigate whether the illnesses may be linked to specific devices, ingredients, or contaminants in the devices, or substances associated with e-cigarette product use. On August 30, 2019, states were asked to submit data to CDC about lung illnesses associated with e-cigarette product use, as well as information about the types of e-cigarette products used. CDC is currently receiving data from affected states and will share updates as more information becomes available.

What health care providers can do

CDC encourages clinicians to immediately report possible cases of e-cigarette-associated lung disease to their local or state health department for further investigation. If e-cigarette product use is suspected as a possible cause for a patient’s lung disease, a detailed history of the substances used, the sources, and the devices used should be obtained, as outlined in the HAN (Health Alert Network), and efforts should be made to determine if any remaining product, devices, and liquids are available for testing.

What the public can do

While this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products. People who do use e-cigarette products should monitor themselves for symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fever) and promptly seek medical attention for any health concerns. Regardless of the ongoing investigation, people who use e-cigarette products should not buy these products off the street and should not modify e-cigarette products or add any substances that are not intended by the manufacturer. E-cigarette products should never be used by youth, young adults, pregnant women, or adults who do not currently use tobacco products.

If you are concerned about your health after using an e-cigarette product, contact your health care provider, or you can also call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Health care providers also can contact their local poison control center.

CDC and FDA encourage the public to submit detailed reports of any unexpected health or product issues related to tobacco or e-cigarette products to the FDA via the online Safety Reporting Portalexternal icon.

The reports released today in CDC’s MMWR include “Severe Pulmonary Disease Associated with Electronic-Cigarette-Product Use – Interim Guidance” by CDC authors and “Notes from the Field: An outbreak of e-cigarette associated acute lipoid pneumonia — North Carolina, July–August, 2019,” from North Carolina cliniciansThe New England Journal of Medicine today released “Preliminary Report: Pulmonary disease associated with e-cigarette use, Illinois and Wisconsin,” with authors from the two states and CDC co-authors.

More information about the investigation is available on the CDC website.

Vape Is The New Selfie: What The 2014 Word Of The Year Says About Our Times

Lindsay Lohan, Katy Perry, Barry Manilow and Ronnie Wood all do it, and now it’s Oxford Dictionaries’ word of the year. Vape: to suck on an electronic cigarette. If you vape, you are a “vaper” (for obvious reasons, no one thought “vapist” was a good idea); and the act of doing so – perhaps in a “vaporium” – is “vaping”. (In fact, “vaping” was coined as long ago as 1983, when such devices were as yet a pipe-dream.)

Associated vape-vocab noticed by Oxford includes “e-cigarette”, “e-juice” (the nicotinous liquid inside), and the pleasing retrospective formation “tobacco cigarette”, so people will know what you mean when referring to what used to be just a “cigarette”. Technically, this is called a retronym, as when people began to say “landline” when mobile phones were invented; or when restaurants began to offer “hen’s eggs” once foodists had moved on to scoffing the eggs of ostriches and probably ants.

A well-chosen word of the year tells us something about the cultural conversation over the past 12 months. As Oxford Dictionaries chief Casper Grathwohl remarks: “This year ‘vape’ sat at the centre of several rich conversations: the debate over private versus community rights; regulation and public health; and our relationship to our visible vices.” So, to look back over 10 years of such lists might be one way to plot a cultural narrative, or at least thrill to our remembered linguistic innocence, before everyone knew what it meant to vape while twerking.

E-Cigarette Firm Eyes Emerging Cannabis Oil Market

OKALAHOMA:  As more states approve the medicinal and recreational use of marijuana, an Oklahoma-based electronic cigarette retailer is looking to build a national franchise.

Marijuana is illegal under federal drug laws. But voters in Oregon, Alaska and Washington, D.C., approved ballot measures Tuesday to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, joining Washington state and Colorado. And in more than a dozen other states, medical marijuana is available.

The growing availability of legal pot opens the door for Tulsa-based Palm Beach Vapors to market a method for producing a cannabis oil product that can be inhaled through a common e-cigarette, according to CEO and co-founder Chip Paul.

“This is a wave that’s kind of sweeping the nation,” said Paul, whose company is looking to patent the method and has already signed licensing deals in California and Colorado for what it calls the M-System. He said he intends to set up franchise locations in other states.

O.PenVape: ‘Google of Marijuana’ NOT Publicly Traded

NEW YORK: Message to pot stock speculators: O.PenVape, the company featured on CNBC in a feature about the marijuana industry, is a private and not publicly traded. So if you are buying shares in a pot stock this morning, it is NOT stock in O.PenVape.

On Wednesday evening, CNBC aired an hour-long feature ‘Marijuana in America: Colorado Pot Rush,’ which included interviews with a handful of pot-industry companies. O.PenVape, a pen cigarette that vaporizes hash oil, stood out as one well-positioned company in Colorado’s green rush. The company’s pen heats up a cartridge of hash-oil, making it a sort of e-cigarette of pot.

CEO Todd Mitchem told CNBC Open Vape sells its cartridges for as much as $40 a pop and that it receives about 270,000 orders a month. Mitchem also told CNBC, as they toured O.PenVape’s offices, that the company grew 1600% in 2013 and he believes it will become “the Google of cannabis.”