A Year After Marijuana Legalization In Colorado, ‘Everything’s Fine’ Confirm Police

COLORADO:  It’s been a year since Colorado became the first state in the US to legalize marijuana, and its impact on health, crime, employment and other factors can now be more empirically measured.

So, did it bring about an apocalypse leaving the streets strewn with out-of-work addicts as some Republicans feared?

“We found there hasn’t been much of a change of anything,” a Denver police officer told CBC this week.

“Basically, officers aren’t seeing much of a change in how they do police work.”

Marijuana News: Police Rethink Seizing Pot In Criminal Cases

COLORADO:  Police in some medical marijuana states who once routinely seized illegal pot plants by ripping them out by their roots and stashing them away in musty evidence rooms to die are now thinking twice about the practice.

From Colorado and Washington state to California and Hawaii, police are being sued by people who want their marijuana back after prosecutors chose not to charge them or they were acquitted.

In some cases, the one-time suspects are asking for hundreds of thousands of dollars to replace dead plants.

Concerns over liability have prompted some agencies to either forgo rounding-up the plants altogether or to improvise by collecting a few samples and photographing the rest to use as evidence for criminal charges.