Eaze Releases 2020 State Of Cannabis Report: “How Cannabis Consumers Responded To Crisis”

Analysis of consumer choices in 2020 across the world’s largest cannabis market offers important lessons for emerging markets nationally and globally

CALIFORNIA:  Eaze, California’s largest legal cannabis marketplace, today released its sixth annual Eaze Insights State of Cannabis Report. The 2020 report, “How Cannabis Consumers Responded to Crisis”, looks at aggregate consumer trends driving the world’s largest cannabis market in a year rocked by unprecedented cultural, economic and public health challenges.

The report aggregates Eaze’s proprietary data to illustrate the behavior of the over 400,000 consumers who purchased via the platform in 2020. With 6.5 million legal deliveries completed to-date, Eaze can offer unique insights into how 2020 impacted consumption, uncovering patterns that can be generalized to markets nationally and globally.

Key findings include:

  • Consumers relied on cannabis delivery during quarantine. Consumer demand driven by COVID-19 led to significant increases in the number of new deliveries and order size.
  • Calls for social justice elevated equity brands. 2020 saw a greater demand for social equity products, underscoring increased consumer awareness – especially among customers over age 30 – about the importance of BIPOC-owned brands.
  • Edibles won the year. Edibles became the most popular product category across major markets and age groups, reflecting the public health focus on COVID’s respiratory impacts. Cannabis drinks especially benefited from the shift to Zoom socializing.
  • A tough holiday season increased consumption. Consumers used more cannabis over the 2020 winter holidays, when many celebrated without their families.
  • Cannabis helped us stay sexy at home. Consumers increasingly relied on weed to increase their sexual satisfaction during stay-at-home orders.
  • Cannabis won the 2020 election. Cannabis legalization in Arizona, New Jersey, Montana and South Dakota united voters on both sides of the aisle and outpaced presidential candidates in key states. In Arizona, Mississippi and New Jersey, cannabis got more votes than either presidential candidate. Consumer anxiety, meanwhile, fueled a demand uptick as votes were tallied.

“In this crisis year, cannabis emerged as an essential product and a unifying political issue,” said Ro Choy, CEO of Eaze. “Consumers relied on delivery during the pandemic and policymakers in emerging markets should look at the data and anticipate how robust demand for legal delivery will work in their communities. The report also shows consumer excitement for social equity brands, affirming that putting money in the pockets of BIPOC entrepreneurs is good business and a direct way to address the War on Drugs.”

The full report can be found here.

Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission Approves Final Adult Use, Medical Use of Marijuana Regulations and Rescinds Colocated Regulations

MASSACHUSETTS: The Cannabis Control Commission (Commission) today approved new medical- and adult-use regulations and phased out 935 CMR 502, Colocated Adult-Use and Medical-Use Marijuana Operations, after bringing sufficient parity to the medical- and adult-use regulations.

“I’m excited that the revised medical- and adult-use regulatory revisions poise the Commission to make significant progress in our mission and statutory mandates on equity, patient access, and public health and safety,” Chairman Steven J. Hoffman said. “While we’ve made tremendous headway over the past three years, we now turn to critical work to implement new provisions, including; the increased caregiver/patient ratio, development of guidance documents, rollout of the Delivery Operator application, and a host of provisions establishing a more equitable and safe industry.”

In the coming weeks, the final regulations will be filed with the Secretary of State’s Regulation Division for promulgation and published on the Commission’s website.

Approved policies include:

Medical Use of Marijuana Program

  • Optimizing Patient access and preserving public safety by:
    • Allowing Caregivers to care for up to five Patients with a Canopy not in excess of 500 square feet;
    • Clarifying that Caregivers may seek a waiver to care for more than five Patients but cannot exceed the 500-square-foot limitation;
    • Preventing perceived risk of diversion by requiring Caregivers to create a log-of-growing and make that log available to the Commission upon request;
    • Broadening the types of physicians who can serve as the second physician making the recommendation for pediatric patients;
    • Requiring Certifying Health Care Providers (Providers) to have a plan to provide discounts to low-income Patients;
    • Allowing Patients with certain hardships to renew every two years instead of one year;
    • Permitting Patients to cultivate up to 12 flowering plants without hardship cultivation, and if more are needed, requiring hardship cultivation;
    • Allowing certain out-of-state Patients to be certified and registered as a Patient in Massachusetts; and
    • Restricting Caregivers from participating in paid advertising.

Equity Programming

  • Promoting a more inclusive and diverse industry by:
    • Waiving all Delivery application and license fees for Certified Economic Empowerment Priority Applicants (EEA) and Social Equity Program (SEP) participants in their first year of licensure under the exclusivity period;
    • Reducing annual license fees by 50%, or to $2,500, for EEAs and SEP participants upon renewal and all subsequent years for applicants;
    • Expanding SEP eligibility to certain categories of individuals and EEAs;
    • Requiring majority ownership by SEP participants in order to access license-related benefits, and potentially expanding these program benefits to microbusinesses and minority-owned, veteran-owned, and women-owned businesses; and
    • Clarifying that individuals who are EEAs, whether on their own or as part of a business entity, can apply as part of a new entity with EEA status so long as it continues to meet three or more of the six criteria, at least one of which shall be a majority-equity-ownership criterion.

Delivery

  • Increasing adult-use access and evolving the Delivery license type by:
    • Approving the Delivery Operator license type, which allows licensees to purchase wholesale Finished Marijuana Products with stringent requirements to warehouse;
    • Clarifying the statutory allowance of up to three Retail licenses and the regulatory allowance of up to a combined total of two Marijuana Courier and/or Delivery Operator licenses;
    • Extending the initial exclusivity period to three-years;
    • Allowing Third-Party Technology Platform Providers to contract with an unlimited number of Delivery Licensees;
    • Authorizing Delivery Operator Licensees to white label, or affix a product label that includes the branding (name and logo) of a specific Marijuana Establishment (ME) to a finished marijuana product that was previously produced and packaged by a licensed Product Manufacturer, Cultivator, Microbusiness, or Craft Marijuana Cooperative for sale to consumers;
    • Allowing Delivery Licensees to sell marijuana accessories and ME-branded goods and non-edible items directly to consumers; and
    • Automatically converting existing Pre-Certified “Delivery-Only” applicants to Delivery Courier Applicants.

Ownership & Control

  • Tightening stringent ownership and control measures further by:
    • Requiring EEAs to report to the Commission all changes of ownership and control and upon renewal and certifying to the Commission that the requisite ownership and control has been maintained by the requisite class of people identified on the EEA’s certification;
    • Preventing monopolies with the addition of safeguards between Third-Party Technology Platforms and Delivery Licensees by explicitly prohibiting:
      • monopolization or attempts at monopolization;
      • inducements;
      • direct or indirect investments from Third-Party Technology Platforms; and
      • restricting determinations of product and licensee placement on an app to objective, customer-oriented criteria.
    • Updating the definition of Persons or Entities with Direct Control by encompassing the equivalent of a Director in a business entity such as a Limited Liability Company, which has Managers in lieu of a Board of Directors, and setting a specific dollar amount with respect to what the Commission considers “significant contracts;” and
    • Confirming that EEAs hold majority ownership (51% or more) over the license to maintain priority status.

Product Database

  • Ensuring that the public is knowledgeable of the hallmarks of legally sourced products, preventing underage access, and lowering the risk of purchasing illicit products by adopting a requirement that Marijuana Establishments, including Delivery Operators, and MTCs comply with the Product Database requirement, just as adult-use licensees must.

Advertising and Branding

  • Modifying advertising and branding regulations by:
    • Allowing of branding sponsorships at certain events, with continued prohibitions on activities that target underage participants or entrants; and
    • Approving targeted advertising through mechanisms such as geofencing, provided they retain documentation of audience composition data related to these marketing activities.

Testing

  • Increasing testing accountability for licencees by:
    • Allowing marijuana products that fail initial contaminant screens to be:
      • Reanalyzed;
      • Remediated and retested by at least the original Independent Testing Laboratory, and a different Independent Testing Laboratory; or
      • Licensees may attempt remediation of a batch that has failed a second test prior to disposal or destruction.
    • Adding new pesticides to the list of pesticides currently required of Independent Testing Laboratory protocols; and
    • Requiring continued testing for vitamin E acetate and a secondary screen for heavy metals from finished vapes.

Video recordings of the Commission’s previous policy discussions and public hearings regarding the new regulations are available on Facebook and YouTube.

Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission Approves Policy Changes To Proposed Regulations for Adult Use Delivery in Massachusetts

MASSACHUSETTS:  Following a public comment period that closed October 15, the Cannabis Control Commission  on Tuesday approved additional policy changes to its draft regulations that establish two Marijuana Establishment types authorized to provide limited delivery services to adult-use cannabis consumers in the Commonwealth. A final vote on all modifications to Massachusetts’ adult and medical use of marijuana regulations will occur at a subsequent public meeting slated for October 29.

Previously referred to as Limited Delivery Licenses and Wholesale Delivery Licenses, the newly categorized Marijuana Courier and Marijuana Delivery Operator license types discussed Tuesday aim to further the Commission’s mission to ensure meaningful participation in the legal cannabis industry by communities that have been disproportionately harmed by marijuana prohibition and to satisfy consumer demand that is currently being met by illicit market participants. The Commission’s draft delivery regulations specify that both license types will be exclusively available to Certified Economic Empowerment Priority Applicants (EEAs) and Social Equity Program (SEP) Participants for a minimum of three years, with the exclusivity period beginning once the first Marijuana Delivery Operator commences operations.

To that end, among the additional delivery changes approved Tuesday, Commissioners put in place operations restrictions, modified caps on ownership and control, and limits to financial relationships with third-party technology platform providers in order to prevent entities from dominating this emerging delivery market segment. They include:

  • Requiring that marijuana products out for distribution by a delivery licensee will be associated with a specific, individual order to prevent entities from operating as mobile warehouses or retail stores;
  • Deeming a third-party technology platform provider with any financial interest— including but not limited to, a delivery agreement or other agreement for services—in a delivery license as a person or entity having direct control over that license, and limiting such control by those providers to one delivery license;
  • Preventing a single entity from holding direct or indirect control over more than two Marijuana Delivery Operator or Marijuana Courier licenses, under the Commission’s three Marijuana Retailer or Delivery License cap, and restricting a single Marijuana Delivery Operator to maintaining one warehouse as their principal place of business or operations;
  • Underscoring that the Commission shall maintain on its website its publicly available and searchable source of information about all operating licensees and include delivery licensees; and
  • Revisiting the provisions for Marijuana Delivery Operators two years after the first entity commences operations in the Commonwealth to study the competitiveness and concentration of the license type, and if necessary, responding with further regulatory changes or guidance.

The Commission also approved policy changes that bring the adult-use delivery regulations in line with sister state agency requirements for commercial vehicles and tax collection, including:

  • Requiring that commercial vehicles used to transport or deliver marijuana or marijuana products must comply with applicable Registry of Motor Vehicle (RMV) requirements, but may not include any additional external marking that indicates the vehicle is being used to transport or deliver marijuana or marijuana products;
  • Clarifying that although Marijuana Delivery Operators are not considered Marijuana Retailers under the Commission’s regulations, they must register as a vendor with the Department of Revenue (DOR) and collect and remit marijuana retail taxes in accordance with DOR regulations.

The Commission’s development of Marijuana Courier and Marijuana Delivery Operator licenses follows the promulgation of a Delivery-Only, Delivery Endorsement, and pre-certification licensing process in 2019 which received substantial public feedback during the agency’s current regulatory review period. The Marijuana Courier model represents an evolution of the Delivery-Only License the Commission had previously approved in 2019, and maintains those policies and provisions in order to keep barriers to industry entry low and support participation by applicants with limited capital.

In direct response to public comment received during the initial 2020 regulatory review period, the Commission approved the Marijuana Delivery Operator license authorizing businesses to purchase marijuana and finished marijuana products at wholesale from Cultivators, Craft Marijuana Cooperatives, Product Manufacturers, and Microbusinesses, and sell individual orders directly to consumers. By expanding the delivery operations available to licensees, the Commission also has adopted additional compliance requirements for Marijuana Delivery Operators pertaining to wholesaling, warehousing, white labeling, and sales.

During Tuesday’s meeting the Commission acknowledged the important role of municipalities allowing for delivery licensees to operate within their borders, including the local control provisions in state law. Under the Commission’s draft regulations, licensed delivery service will be able to occur within:

  • A municipality which the delivery licensee has identified as its place of business;
  • Any municipality which allows for adult-use retail within its borders; or
  • Any municipality which, after receiving notice from the Commission, has then notified the Commission that delivery may operate within its borders.

Marijuana Retailers and Micro businesses with Delivery Endorsements will be required to inform their host municipality law enforcement authorities, including police and fire departments, about plans to deliver marijuana and marijuana products directly to consumers.

Tuesday’s session followed multiple public meetings and public comment periods held in June, July, August, and September covering proposed changes across both sets of Commission regulations. To review regulatory drafts, meeting summaries, or minutes from those discussions, visit MassCannabisControl.com. To access video recordings of previous meetings, visit the Commission’s Facebook or YouTube channels. After the Commission reconvenes October 29 to vote on the final adult and medical use of marijuana regulatory changes, those provisions will be submitted to the Secretary of State’s Office for their review and promulgation.

OREGON: OLCC Commission Takes Step to Continue Curbside Delivery

Begins Process to Ban Additives in Inhalable Cannabis Products

Commissioners Also Approve Marijuana Licensee Stipulated Settlements

 

OREGON:  At its regular monthly meeting on June 18, 2020, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission moved to extend the ability of licensed marijuana retailers to continue curbside delivery, and took the first step towards adopting rules that would ban non-cannabis additives from inhalable cannabis products.  Commissioners also approved six marijuana violation stipulated settlement agreements.

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic the OLCC, in order to promote social distancing required under the Governor’s Executive Orders, approved a temporary rule allowing licensed marijuana retailers to make “curbside delivery” within the immediate vicinity of their licensed (premises) retail store. That temporary rule expires in September 2020 and cannot be extended with another temporary rule.

Because the duration of the pandemic remains unknown, measures aimed at accommodating social distancing requirements and minimizing person-to-person contact remain critical to protecting public health. The proposed rule provides licensed marijuana retailers flexibility in how they can deliver to consumers at their licensed premises.

In the fall of 2019, a number of Oregonians suffered from the outbreak of vaping-associated lung injury (VALI) linked in part to inhalable cannabis products.  As of March, 2020, Oregon had 23 reported cases of VALI, including two fatalities.  VALI has been tentatively linked to additives combined with cannabis oil.

Commission staff are attempting to address consumer product safety concerns by prohibiting all processed non-cannabis additives from being added to inhalable cannabis products. Non-cannabis vaping additives are used in cannabis vaping products for a variety of purposes, including dilution, flavor, and effects.  However, non-cannabis additives are not necessary to make a vape product work with vaping technology.

Although the additives may be generally recognized as safe (GRAS) for ingestion, the same cannot be said for their inhalation. There is no regulatory body that evaluates the safety of these ingredients when inhaled, and additive makers do not disclose all of their ingredients due to trade secret concerns.

The Commission also ratified the following violation fines and suspensions based on stipulated settlements (detailed information on specific cases can be found here on the OLCC website):

  • MAHALO in Hillsboro will pay a fine of $3,795 OR serve a 23-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension for one violation.

Licensee is: Mahalo, Inc.; Frankie Powell, President/Secretary/Director/Stockholder.

  • PLANE JANE DISPENSARY in Portland will serve a 30-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension OR pay a fine of $3,795 AND serve a seven-day suspension for one violation.

Licensees are: Plane Janes’ LLC; Patricia Wiegele, Member.

  • MYLES MYERS will pay a fine of $750 OR serve a 30-day marijuana worker permit suspension for one violation.

Marijuana Worker Permit #393L5E.

  • GREEN BOX in Portland will pay a fine of $2,640 OR serve a 16-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension for two violations.

Licensees are: Green Box, LLC; Adrian Wayman, Member; Robert Wayman, Member.

  • PARADISE FOUND in Portland will pay a fine of $10,230 OR serve a 62-day recreational marijuana retailer license suspension for two violations.

Licensees are:  JIMO Holdings, LLC; Joseph Cohen, Member; Idan Magal, Member; Arman Daytian, Member/Manager.

  • WINDS OF CHANGE* will surrender its recreational marijuana producer license suspension for eight violations.

Licensees are:  Winds of Change, LLC; James McQuade, Member.

Oregon Marijuana Retail Licensees Allowed To Provide Curbside Delivery

Temporary Rule Aligns With Governor’s Executive Order to Promote Social Distancing

OREGON: The Oregon Liquor Control Commission approved a temporary rule that supports social distancing to promote prevention of the spread of the COVID-19 virus, by allowing licensed marijuana retailers to conduct limited transactions outside their licensed premises.  The action will permit retail licensees to take orders and deliver product from the retail store to a person who is outside of the store and within 150 feet of the retailer’s licensed premises.

At an emergency meeting to consider temporary rules impacting the business activity of OLCC licensees in the alcohol and marijuana industry, the Commission took its action to promote social distancing in the wake of the COVID-19 virus.  The Commission’s action aligns with the Governor’s Executive Order that prohibits public gatherings of 25 people or more, and encourages people to distance themselves by at least 3 feet while in public.

The temporary rule also increases the amount of flower that OMMP cardholders and caregivers can purchase to 24 ounces per day and no more than 32 ounces per month. This change temporarily increases the daily purchase limit for OMMP cardholders to match their personal possession limit. This rule does not change the total monthly amount a cardholder or caregiver is currently permitted to purchase from an OLCC-licensed retailer.

The temporary action that the Commission has taken is designed to balance the protection of public health while at the same time helping struggling businesses.  Marijuana industry guidance can be found here.

“Every single decision that this agency is making, both for the liquor and the marijuana industries, are there for the consideration of helping people make a living and continue to make a living,” said Paul Rosenbaum, OLCC Commission Chair.

During the period of March 1-18, 2020, OLCC marijuana retailers have seen a 25-30% increase in sales compared to the same period last year.  Retail marijuana stores remain open, but these changes will let them operate in a way that is consistent with the guidance from the Executive Order by decreasing in-store activity.

However the OLCC made it clear that if individual licensees take advantage of the temporary rule by disrupting public safety or public health that the rule could be suspended for the whole industry.

“We’re asking our retailers to make sure to work with the community and local officials so that this can happen in a safe and non-obstructive way to city services, otherwise we’ll need to make changes,” said Steve Marks, OLCC Executive Director.

Grassdoor Provides Fastest Cannabis Delivery Service In Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA: Grassdoor is offering fast and efficient cannabis delivery in Los Angeles and the Orange County area. It’s a relief to people in the county who need access to cannabis and related products easily and to tight deadlines.

The Grassdoor marijuana delivery app in Los Angeles is dedicated to delivering cannabis products door to door within 40 minutes. A further advantage that comes with using the app is that all products are a top brand, so a good user experience is guaranteed.

Fast service from a local provider

Grassdoor is dedicated to providing the fastest available cannabis delivery service in Los Angeles and Orange County. However, the company recognizes that it’s not just speed of delivery that is important.

It’s also making sure that the service it provides is friendly and efficient and that its products are fresh and safe to use. This is something that the people of Los Angeles have been waiting for. They get access to top brand cannabis products without ever having to leave home. They are also guaranteed to receive the products in a timely and safe manner.

Tried and tested products that can be trusted

The best news about this fast cannabis delivery provision from Grassdoor is that all the products that the company delivers are tried and tested.

The owners of the company are connoisseurs of the cannabis industry. This means that they have chosen the highest quality flowers for customers while keeping the products at an affordable cost.

All of the cartridges and pens that are delivered by Grassdoor have been tested for effectiveness and safety of use. The testing and guarantee of quality apply to all of the products that are delivered by Grassdoor. These products include oil cartridges, vape pens, blunts, edibles, THC concentrates, CBD products and accessories.

Customers at the forefront of a cannabis delivery service

This delivery service is big news for the people of Los Angeles and Orange County. They are being provided with a way of getting the cannabis-related items that they need, quickly and with no fuss.

They are also at the receiving end of some of the best customer service in the cannabis delivery industry. This customer service is delivered by the experienced customer service team at Grass Door that is on hand 10 am to 9:30 pm, 365 days a year. The team is dedicated to providing answers to customer questions and helping people get the products they need.

Anyone in the Los Angeles and Orange County area, who needs access to high-quality marijuana-related items can now get what they need to be delivered straight to the door.

The biggest change that Grass Door has made to the cannabis delivery industry in this part of the country is increased speed. There is no doubt that a delivery time of no more than 40 minutes is a major advantage to anyone who needs to have cannabis, and related accessories, within a tight timeframe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Same-Day Cannabis Delivery Key To Combating Illicit Drug Market

By Evan Adcock

Legal cannabis retailers are at an extreme disadvantage in the budding multi-billion dollar industry because of their inability to offer convenient, same-day delivery to consumers.

While the higher cost of legal cannabis is often cited as the reason for the continued dominance of illicit markets, the divide between the convenience of obtaining legal versus illegal cannabis products has been almost completely absent from the narrative.

It’s 2019. Today’s consumers – millennials specifically – expect to be able to pick up their phone, place an order and enjoy the gratification of almost instant delivery. Blame corporate giants such as Amazon, Uber Eats, GrubHub, or Doordash for creating those expectations – however, this is the reality for many retail stores to stay afloat now that we’re in the digital age.

And these companies are cashing in on this new reality, with door-to-door food delivery accounting for $30-billion in annual sales. As door-to-door food delivery options continue to grow, analysts at Morgan Stanley predict that food delivery will account for 40 per cent, or $220-billion, of all restaurant sales by 2020.

While there are legal options for ordering cannabis online in some states and provinces, most involve mail-order, which makes consumers wait days, even weeks for delivery. Consumers unwilling to wait could always shop at the brick and mortar stores, but with the number of stores spread so thin in highly populated areas like Ontario, there is little incentive for consumers to make the switch to government-sanctioned cannabis.

Meanwhile, well-established online directories offer up scores of illegal sellers – in virtually every city in North America – who offer same-day delivery.  Unsophisticated consumers, knowing only that cannabis is now legal, could unwittingly assume that these are legal options because something illegal typically would not be so readily available. With these types of directories making their way through North America and not properly informing their audience, we’ll continue to see huge spikes in illicit market sales, and revenue streams going right into the pockets of criminals – exactly what our government was aiming not to do with the decriminalization of marijuana.

These challenges around access are extremely unfortunate, given that cannabis consumers have publicly acknowledged the importance of quality and safety when choosing their suppliers. In a recent Statistics Canada survey, quality and safety were among the top three concerns for cannabis users when choosing a distributor. But without having easy access to products that have gone through rigorous quality control, users are reluctant to abandon their traditional methods of acquiring cannabis.

The inability for legal cannabis retailers to offer home delivery has allowed illicit drug distributors to maintain a stranglehold on the market. In 2018, legal retailers accounted for approximately $7-billion in market sales, while the illicit market brought in roughly $50-55-billion. Around 89 per cent of cannabis users in North America admit that the illicit market remains their preferred source of cannabis, and this trend is not expected to change without drastic service enhancements to legal cannabis distribution channels.

Illegal third-party couriers delivering unregulated and potentially dangerous cannabis

Unfettered by government regulations, illicit market cannabis distributors are capitalizing on home delivery services to maintain their hold on the market and increase profits. Illegal established directories advertise unmandated delivery services and promote illicit retailers who offer cannabis delivery, but there is no way to know if those retailers are selling legal or illegal cannabis. And with no way to know if the cannabis is laced with other substances, consumers could be exposed to potentially fatal products.

In a startling analysis of California’s cannabis retail market, illegal sellers now outnumber regulated businesses almost three-to-one. Critics are blaming these established illegal directories for not only letting illicit retailers advertise unlicensed marijuana on their platform(s), but for delivering dangerous and illegal product right to their front doors.

The good news is, cannabis regulators in California are starting to crack down, putting companies like Weedmaps on notice because advertising unlicensed cannabis businesses is against state law and may lead to significant financial penalties.

Challenging regulatory environment

While North American policy makers anticipate moving towards a home delivery model for legal retailers to curb illicit cannabis use, laws and regulations are still a long way from implementation. Coupled with the fact that legal retailers have to charge between 35 and 120 per cent more than illicit market dealers for their product, the inability to offer convenient, same-day delivery puts them at a severe disadvantage.

States like Massachusetts and California are bucking the trend, allowing legal distributors to use licensed third-party couriers to provide door-to-door delivery. While the price point is still higher for legal cannabis, offering same-day delivery and a guarantee that the cannabis will be untainted and of the highest quality is important to cannabis users.

 A 2018 Society for the Study of Addiction survey found that given equal access, consumers are willing to pay 50 per cent more for legal cannabis. This would be a significant bottom line boost for legal retailers, while putting a sizable dent in the illicit drug market.

Legal third-party delivery key to boosting economy and eradicating illicit drug market

Enabling same-day delivery through third-party couriers is also expected to boost total consumption figures, ensuring that legal cannabis producers have plenty of buyers for their product. In Canada, producers are harvesting over 62,600 kilograms of cannabis per month, but with the illicit market owning such a significant share of the market, industry experts are warning that cash-strapped producers could have to apply for bankruptcy or merge because legal retailers are not selling fast enough to keep up with the harvest.

Governments across North America are well aware that implementing convenient, same-day cannabis delivery is essential to eradicating the illicit drug market. Not only will it boost retailer and public sector profits, it will also help convince Canadian and United States citizens that the government’s legalization plan did what it set out to do – reduce criminal involvement in the sale of cannabis.

Lacking the resources to execute this move, third party couriers will be integral to the success of door-to-door cannabis delivery. These couriers have the unique opportunity to revolutionize the cannabis industry by guaranteeing consumers a safe, quality-tested product, delivered conveniently to their homes. Door-to-door delivery will empower legal retailers to grow and expand their businesses while eradicating North America’s dangerous and illegal drug distribution network.


Evan Adcock is CEO and co-founder of Verda, a Waterloo-based company that instantly provides legal cannabis retailers e-commerce and delivery solutions, while offering consumers the safety and convenience of same-day delivery.

California: Regulators Finalize Rules Permitting Cannabis Home Deliveries

CALIFORNIA: State regulators gave final approval last week to regulations governing the commercial sale of cannabis, including rulespermitting its home delivery.

Under the plan, licensed businesses will be able to home deliver cannabis to adults — including those who reside in localities that have otherwise prohibited retail cannabis sales. An estimated 390 of the states 482 cities do not currently authorize retail cannabis operations.

The League of California Cities opposes the new home-delivery rules and some experts anticipate that the regulations could eventually lead to litigation between municipalities and state regulators.

The new rules take immediate effect.


For more information, contact Justin Strekal, NORML Political Director, at (202) 483-5500or visit California NORML.

Eaze Launches New CBD Marketplace

Eaze Wellness will take the guesswork out of CBD, ensuring consumers have access to education and curated CBD products

CALIFORNIA: Eaze has announced a major expansion of its offerings with the launch of Eaze Wellness, a new online marketplace shipping hemp-derived CBD products to 41 states across the United States and the District of Columbia. Eaze Wellness launches during a time of heightened public interest in CBD and provides consumers with education and access to prominent, national CBD brands.

eaze

The launch is Eaze’s first expansion outside of California combining the company’s deep understanding of the cannabis industry and strong brand partnerships with its experience building a successful and compliant e-commerce platform.

“Eaze’s mission has always been to educate consumers and provide safe, legal access to cannabis. The launch of Eaze Wellness is a natural next step in our mission,” said Jim Patterson, CEO of Eaze. “Americans are curious about CBD and asking for high-quality CBD products, but until now, there’s been no singular destination where consumers with a variety of experience levels can find the products that are right for them. Eaze Wellness changes that.”

Eaze Wellness will feature an assortment of hemp-derived CBD products from Plant People, Cannuka, BeTrū Wellness, Vital Leaf, and more. Consumers over the age of 21 can visit www.eazewellness.com to learn about CBD, browse the menu and purchase products. Their purchases will be shipped via a third-party provider and will arrive in 4-6 business days.

Eaze Announces New Program To Provide U.S. Veterans With 25% Discount

CALIFORNIA: Eaze, the on-demand cannabis marketplace, today announced the launch of a new program to expand access to cannabis for U.S. veterans. Beginning this Veterans Day (Sunday, November 11), veterans will receive a 25% discount on products purchased through Eaze. The discount reflects Eaze’s commitment to helping veterans safely access sustainable, affordable relief from PTSD, physical disabilities, chronic pain, and other combat-related conditions.

eaze

Through its Social Impact program, Eaze advocates for access to those who rely on cannabis and can’t afford it in many cases. Eaze has worked with veterans’ organizations, including Operation EVAC, over the last year to better understand the barriers preventing veterans from accessing cannabis, which is being studied as a treatment for PTSD. Affordability has remained a persistent issue.

“Helping patients is a cornerstone of Eaze’s mission,” said Jim Patterson, CEO of Eaze. “As an Air Force veteran, I’ve watched friends and colleagues struggle with war injuries and trauma. I strongly believe we should give vets and doctors as many options as possible to help them live their best lives.”

“Veteran’s day is an annual opportunity to salute and celebrate the defenders of our Homeland while properly welcoming them home,” said Ryan Miller, Founder of Operation EVAC. “Educating veterans about the benefits of cannabis and providing support groups has been an ongoing mission of ours. Partnering with Eaze has been a blessing to our community to provide safe, legal channels of access for them.”

To receive the Eaze discount, veterans must email proof of their veteran status to veterans@eaze.com. Once approved, the discount is automatic. For verification, veterans must email front AND back photos of one of the following: Veterans Identification Card (VIC), Veterans Health Identification Card (VHIC), State-Issued Driver’s License or ID card with Veteran Designation, Uniformed Services ID Card, or Common Access Card (CAC). Veterans who want to learn more about the U.S. Department of Veterans’ Affairs policy on cannabis can visit https://www.publichealth.va.gov/marijuana.asp.