Marijuana ‘Dabbing’ Is ‘Exploding Onto The Drug-Use Scene’

NORTH CAROLINA:  Young people who use marijuana and are looking for a new way to get high may be increasingly turning to “dabbing,” a new paper suggests.

Dabbing is inhaling the vapors from a concentrated form of marijuana made by an extraction method that uses butane gas. Dabs, also known as butane hash oil (BHO) — which are sometimes called “budder,” “honeycomb” or “earwax” — are more potent than conventional forms of marijuana because they have much higher concentrations of the psychoactive chemical tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, than is found in regular cannabis, according to the paper.

“We have been seeing an emergence of dabs over the last three years,” said John Stogner, co-author of the new paper and an assistant professor of criminal justice and criminology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. “It is really exploding onto the drug-use scene.”

New Marijuana Trend Sends Smokers To Burn Units

COLORADO:  For marijuana enthusiasts in Colorado, 420, a common nickname for pot, is old news. The new code number is 710. Flip the digits upside down and you get “oil,” a reference to oil-based cannabis concentrates. This wildly potent wax-like substance is one of the fastest growing segments of the marijuana industry.

The psychoactive component in pot is tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. The THC content of pot has been steadily rising for decades, from around 3.5 percent in 1985 to 13 percent today. But these new concentrates can reach a staggering 90 percent THC. The high from smoking them or “dabbing” is so intense, High Times magazine called it a “quantum leap forward” in getting stoned. Concentrates are worth more per gram than gold.

That dizzying concentration also means a higher risk of addiction. Cannabis isn’t usually associated with physical dependency. But Denver’s only burn unit is seeing a rising number of patients burned in dabbing-related explosions, and many of them appear to be in the throes of withdrawal.

‘A Little Dab’ll Do Ya’: Popularity Of ‘Honey Oil,’ Marijuana Concentrates Growing In Maine

MAINE:  A slight change in Maine’s medical marijuana laws earlier this year has sparked a new trend in this sudden growth industry: the manufacture and legal sale of highly concentrated liquid marijuana, better known as “honey oil.”

A little dab’ll do ya, that’s for sure,” said Ryan, a Bangor medical marijuana patient, about the potent substance, which can be smoked or vaporized and inhaled. One hit of the marijuana concentrate feels equivalent to one marijuana cigarette, he said, speaking to the BDN on condition his last name not be published.

Known as “honey oil,” “hash oil,” “dabs,” “earwax” or “shatter,” among other names, homemade marijuana concentrates have caught on quickly because of the popularity and availability of e-cigarettes and vaporizer pens, which offer an easy, discreet way to use the drug.

Yet the rapid spreading of concentrates is a concern for law enforcement, as the potency of marijuana oil can be dangerous, especially for first-time users, and some ways of creating concentrates have led to deadly explosions, according to the National Drug Threat Assessment Summary 2014.

Marijuana 'Hash Oil' Explodes In Popularity, And Kitchens

WASHINGTON:  If you think the recent liberalization of marijuana laws around the country is only about smoking leaves and buds, think again. For users younger than 25, “hash oil” is where it’s really at. This concentrated resin of marijuana is creating new public safety headaches — even in places where it’s legal.

There have always been forms of the substance, but the resins available today are much stronger than in years past. That’s due in part to the expertise developed by medical marijuana producers, who have learned how to make more potent versions of the oil.

Near Seattle, medical marijuana entrepreneur Jeremy Kelsey shows off a sample of a resin that he markets as extreme pain medication for cancer patients. It looks like dark green Karo syrup. Kelsey calls it “pure THC.” [Read more…]

Marijuana 'Hash Oil' Explodes In Popularity, And Kitchens

WASHINGTON:  If you think the recent liberalization of marijuana laws around the country is only about smoking leaves and buds, think again. For users younger than 25, “hash oil” is where it’s really at. This concentrated resin of marijuana is creating new public safety headaches — even in places where it’s legal.

There have always been forms of the substance, but the resins available today are much stronger than in years past. That’s due in part to the expertise developed by medical marijuana producers, who have learned how to make more potent versions of the oil.

Near Seattle, medical marijuana entrepreneur Jeremy Kelsey shows off a sample of a resin that he markets as extreme pain medication for cancer patients. It looks like dark green Karo syrup. Kelsey calls it “pure THC.” [Read more…]

DEA Moves to Create New Drug Code For Marijuana Extracts

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA:  The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is looking to move forward on creating a new controlled substances code number for marijuana extract.

The extract, known as butane hash oil (or BHO) — and also known on the streets as “wax,” or “dabs” — is jacked up with concentrated levels of tetrahydrocannabino (THC), which is the chemical compound in pot that hits brain the hardest.

The code number set by the DEA would allow them to track quantities of extract separately from quantities of marijuana.

According to the United States Federal Register, the DEA defines it as “extracts that have been derived from any plant of the genus cannabis and which contain cannabinols and cannabidiols.”

While BHO gives the user a stronger, more concentrated high, accidents from cooking it up continue to pop up.

Eden Labs – An Education in Concentration

In the news these days, there is a lot of talk about cannabis concentrates – potent extractions which strip desired properties from the cannabis plant. Once extracted, these concentrates are processed and take many forms before being given to patients.

Studies have shown this gooey sticky substance to reduce tumor cells in cancer patients, and others regulate ailments such as epilepsy, ADD, and autism in adults and children. Zero THC and high CBD concoctions are traditionally taken under the tongue or mixed with food.

Recreationally, consumers prefer high THC concentrates aka dabs, oils, wax, shatter, BHO, or budder because it reduces the side effects of traditional pipe or bong smoking. The concentrate is heated to a very high temperature, and the vaporized smoke is inhaled through cigarette-type pen, or new accessory such as an Oil rig.

Prices for concentrates currently available at most Seattle-area medical dispensaries range from $25 to $50 per gram, with THC potency reaching as high as 80% or more.

Since Colorado and Washington first voted to legalize recreational marijuana use in late 2012, the legal cannabis market has grown from $1.5 billion in 2013 to $2.7 billion last year, according to industry estimates. That kind of velocity gets the attention of investors, many of whom focus on tech.

AC Braddock address the MJBA Women’s Alliance

There are a lot of names for basically the same process – it is the solvent that makes a difference. For example, “RSO was originally made with Naphtha,” according to Fritz Chess of Eden Labs. Naphtha is a light hydrocarbon, much like butane and propane, and toxic if not properly purged. There are several companies saying they make RSO with ethanol extractions – but this is not true, and patients should know exactly what solvent is used on each “pull”.

“Isopropyl is also used in some concentrates, but said by some to do a very gross thing in the human body…like weaken the egg walls of Fluke worms in the body resulting in outbreaks internally that may actually cause cancer.” According to AC Braddock, Eden Labs CEO.

Concentrates are extremely dangerous to manufacture, which is why the State of Washington wants to regulate the process and sale of concentrates. There have been several reported accidents of kitchen and garage fires.

60 Liter Co2 System

60 Liter Co2 System

Beginning in the early 90s, Fritz experimented with Coldfinger ethanol extractors and quickly moved to Sub and Supercritical Co2, building his first system in 1997. This year Fritz is being touted as being the “outlier” in the market with the development of the Hi-Flo that was released this year.

While the studies are still coming out, it seems that carbon-dioxide extraction is the safest and cleanest way to make concentrates for both medical and recreational markets. Production equipment can be purchased from $40,000 to $200,000.

Original Reporting MJNN Contributing Editor Morgan

Eden Labs – An Education in Concentration

In the news these days, there is a lot of talk about cannabis concentrates – potent extractions which strip desired properties from the cannabis plant. Once extracted, these concentrates are processed and take many forms before being given to patients.

Studies have shown this gooey sticky substance to reduce tumor cells in cancer patients, and others regulate ailments such as epilepsy, ADD, and autism in adults and children. Zero THC and high CBD concoctions are traditionally taken under the tongue or mixed with food.  [Read more…]

The Marijuana Industry's Latest 'It Product': 'Dabs'

CALIFORNIA: It’s become a daily occurrence. Customers visit Hugs Alternative Care, a medical-marijuana dispensary in Sacramento, Calif., and ask for “dabs.”

They are referring to butane hash oil, an especially potent form of marijuana, also known as “honey,” “honey oil,” “wax” or “earwax” because of its sticky, amber-colored appearance. [Read more…]