Curaleaf Announces New Branding For All Connecticut Dispensary Locations

Curaleaf Brand Coming to Recently Acquired Arrow Alternative Care and Grassroots Dispensaries in GrotonHartfordMilford and Stamford

MASSACHUSETTS: Curaleaf Holdings, Inc., a leading vertically integrated cannabis operator in the United States, announced new Curaleaf dispensary branding for all of the Company’s recently acquired Arrow Alternative Care and GR Companies, Inc. (“Grassroots”) dispensary locations in Connecticut. Curaleaf is the largest national retail dispensary brand in the U.S., and a premium mainstream cannabis brand available in 23 states as well as across a wide range of innovative products and form factors.

Joseph Lusardi, Chief Executive Officer of Curaleaf, said: “Building on our market leading position in Connecticut, we’re pleased to bring the Curaleaf branding to all four of our local medical cannabis dispensaries in the state. The rebranding of these locations directly aligns with our strategy of building strong, national brands that are renowned for high-quality products, backed by science, that deliver exceptional customer satisfaction.  With our Curaleaf brand in health and wellness, and our Select brand ranked as the #1 cannabis oil brand, we remain focused on providing our products directly to an expanding range of Connecticut patients. Overall, we are extremely proud to be active partners within these local communities and we look forward to building long-lasting relationships with them.”

Curaleaf began cultivating and processing medical cannabis in Connecticut in 2014. Today, Curaleaf is one of four licensed growers in Connecticut and operates a 60,000 square foot cultivation facility in Simsbury that provides high-quality cannabis products to over 9,000 patients statewide through its four dispensaries as well as wholesale channels.

In April of 2020, Curaleaf achieved vertical integration in Connecticut with the completion of its acquisition of Arrows’ dispensaries in Harford, Milford and Stamford, three of the largest Connecticut metro-areas. Under Curaleaf’s branding strategy, all three former Arrow dispensaries have been rebranded as Curaleaf dispensaries. Strategically placed in key metro areas, Arrow established itself as a market leader in Connecticut, operating three out of the 18 total dispensaries in the state. The Hartford dispensary opened in 2016, followed by Milford in 2017 and the Stamford store opening to customers in January of 2020. Additionally, in July of 2020, Curaleaf successfully completed the acquisition of Grassroots, including the Grassroots Herbology dispensary located in Groton, which has also been rebranded as a Curaleaf dispensary.

Curaleaf’s Connecticut dispensaries offers a broad range of flower, extracted oil and edible products manufactured to meet the highest product quality and regulatory compliance standards. Connecticut recently added as a qualifying medical condition Chronic Pain of at least six months duration associated with a specified underlying chronic condition refractory to other treatment intervention, which has the potential to significantly expand the size of the addressable market. In June of 2020, Curaleaf expanded its line of Select brand products into Connecticut with Select Elite Live cartridges available at local medical dispensaries across the state. Select, America’s #1 cannabis oil brand, can be found in 14 states including ArizonaCaliforniaColoradoConnecticutFloridaMarylandMichiganNevadaNew YorkOhioOklahomaOregonMassachusetts, and Maine. As a recognized industry leader, Select is committed to meeting high quality control standards and testing transparency as well as delivering a smooth, flavorful experience with all products formulated with strain-specific terpenes.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Curaleaf dispensaries have been deemed an essential service in many states, including Connecticut. Curaleaf continues to serve patients and customers while implementing heightened safety and hygienic measures including increased cleaning protocols, social distancing, mobile pre-ordering, and curbside pickup for at-risk populations.

For additional information about Curaleaf’s Connecticut dispensaries please visit https://ct.curaleaf.com/

Connecticut: Regulators Expand Qualifying Conditions Eligible For Cannabis Therapy

CONNECTICUT:Patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis, spasticity disorders, and neuropathic facial pain are among those who are now eligible for marijuana therapy following a decision this week by regulators to expand the program’s list of qualifying conditions.

Under the just-announced rules, doctors may for the first time recommend medical cannabis to patients with the following diagnoses: spasticity, severe rheumatoid arthritis, post herpetic neuralgia, hydrocephalus, intractable headache, neuropathic facial pain, muscular dystrophy, and osteogenesis imperfecta (aka broken bone disease). Over 27,000 Connecticut are currently enrolled in the state’s medical cannabis program.


For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org.

Marijuana Legalization Could Come To These 12 States This Year

By Eric Weisbrot

Despite strong efforts to maintain the criminalization of marijuana use in the United States, many individuals and lawmakers have taken a step in the direction of legalization over the last several years. Currently, there are 29 states that allow for medical marijuana use, under particular limitations, and a smaller percentage that give residents the ability to use marijuana on a recreational basis under state law. The federal government has been slow to end prohibition of the drug, but recent research shows growing support for legalization on a state level for many reasons.

One of the strongest components of marijuana legalization support revolves around the well-documented success of states that have eliminated prohibition for residents. The states that allow for recreational use of marijuana have systems in place to ensure the tax revenue and economic growth is regulated, mostly through the use of bonding and licensing requirements for dispensaries, growers, and distributors. Based on the positive outcomes legalized states have generated, there are 12 more states considering legalizing marijuana use on some level in 2018.

Michigan: In the state of Michigan, there is a current initiative to gather the 250,000 signatures needed to include a marijuana legalization bill on the ballot in the 2018 election cycle. If approved, the bill would allow for recreational use of the drug for those over the age of 21 who are also residents of the state.

Delaware: In late 2017, a legislative task force was formed in order to analyze the impact marijuana use has on state residents from a recreational standpoint. A bill was shot down in 2017, but the hope is that an opportunity remains in 2018 after the findings of the task force are made public.

New Jersey: With a Democratic-led legislature, New Jersey is poised to legalize the use of marijuana for recreational purposes in 2018. A skyrocketing criminal justice cost along with proven racial injustices in the state are the prime motivators behind passing such legislation this year.

Vermont: A bill legalizing the recreational use of marijuana was approved in Vermont in May 2017, but it was vetoed by the governor at the time. A commission tasked with studying the issues surrounding recreational marijuana use, including health concerns and driving impairment statistics, was created at that time. Based on the results of the commission’s work, legislation is set to pass in Vermont in 2018 allowing adults over the age of 21 to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and cultivation of two mature plants.

Oklahoma: During either the June or November elections, Oklahoma is set to add a bill to the ballot for medical marijuana use legalization for state residents.

Ohio: Lawmakers in Ohio failed to get a bill passed to legalize recreational marijuana use in the last three years, but a ballot proposal is intended to be included during the midterm election cycle this year.

Connecticut: Thanks to local efforts from lawmakers in Harford, Connecticut legislature is set to include a statewide ballot vote for recreational marijuana legalization in November 2018.

Rhode Island: After forming a legislative commission in 2017, Rhode Island may be one of the next states to legalize recreational marijuana use in 2018. The commission sought to research the impacts of the drug on its community, based on neighboring studies in Massachusetts and Maine.

Kentucky: A bill for the legalization of medical marijuana may be on the docket in 2018 for residents of Kentucky. Although there is little support from the current governor, advocates for the drug’s medical use may beat the odds during the midterm election cycle.

Utah: Medical marijuana may be legalized in Utah, following in the footsteps of several other states nearby. The ballot for the midterm elections should include a bill for Utah voters to weigh in on in 2018.

South Dakota: South Dakota may also be close to legalizing medical marijuana, as signatures are currently being gathered for a ballot initiative slated for 2018 election inclusion.

Missouri: Similar to South Dakota, signatures are currently being collected for a medical marijuana bill in Missouri which would allow voters to make the decision in this election cycle.


Eric Weisbrot is the Chief Marketing Officer of JW Surety Bonds. With years of experience in the surety industry under several different roles within the company, he is also a contributing author to the surety bond blog.  

Connecticut House Appropriations Committee Approves Marijuana Legalization Bill

CONNECTICUT: The Joint Committee on Appropriations approved a bill that would legalize and regulate marijuana for adults in Connecticut on Thursday, potentially setting it up for floor consideration before the end of this year’s legislative session.

regulate marijuanaHB 5394, which was introduced by the committee, would task the commissioners of Mental Health and Addiction Services and Consumer Protection and Revenue Services with developing regulations for possession and retail sales of marijuana for adults 21 and older. More details will be added to the bill as it moves forward over the coming weeks.

“This committee vote reiterates what most Connecticut residents already know: it is time to make marijuana legal for adults,” said Becky Dansky, legislative counsel for the Marijuana Policy Project. “The discussions that have taken place in the legislature this year have provided more than enough information to effectively move forward with legalization. Connecticut should stop punishing adults for using a substance that is safer than alcohol, and it has an opportunity to regulate marijuana before it starts losing tax revenue to other states in the region that have already started this process.”

There are nine states that have made marijuana legal for adults, as well as the District of Columbia. Neighboring Massachusetts is in the process of implementing its regulated marijuana market, and in nearby New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy has made legalizing and regulating marijuana a priority this year.

poll conducted by Sacred Heart University in October 2017 showed that 71% of Connecticut residents support regulating and taxing marijuana for adults.

 

Court: Marijuana’s Schedule I Status Does Not Justify Workplace Discrimination Against State-Qualified Patients

CONNECTICUT: A federal district court judge has determined that marijuana’s illicit status under federal law does not preempt statewide protections explicitly prohibiting qualified medical cannabis patients from facing discrimination in the workplace.

The defendant in the case, Bride Brook Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, argued that marijuana’s classification as a Schedule I drug under the US Controlled Substances Act provided a legal basis for its decision to rescind a job offer to a would-be employee after she failed a drug screen. United States District Court Judge Jeffrey Alker Meyer disagreed.

He wrote: “This lawsuit calls upon me to decide if federal law preempts Connecticut law. In particular, I must decide if federal law precludes enforcement of a Connecticut law that prohibits employers from firing or refusing to hire someone who uses marijuana for medicinal purposes. I conclude that the answer to that question is ‘no’ and that a plaintiff who uses marijuana for medicinal purposes in compliance with Connecticut law may maintain a cause of action against an employer who refuses to employ her for this reason.”

The ruling follows that of a similar decision in Massachusetts in July which determined that state-registered medical cannabis patients may sue a private employer for discrimination if they are fired for their off-the-job marijuana use.

The case is Noffsinger v. SSC Niantic Operating Company, LLC.

Connecticut Cops Told To Prepare For Legal Recreational Marijuana

CONNECTICUT: — Robert Ticer is no fan of legalized recreational marijuana.

And the Avon, Colo., police chief said Thursday that more pot in Connecticut’s future would increase challenges for cops on this state’s roads.

“It’s mind-boggling,” he said of marijuana’s spread through Colorado, speaking at the Webster Bank Arena as part of a traffic safety summit. “It’s crazy.”

Full legalization was approved as a Colorado constitutional amendment in 2013, and there are now 505 medical dispensaries and 322 retail stores selling recreational cannabis — outnumbering the 405 Starbucks stores and 227 McDonald’s — Ticer said.

Connecticut Gets 19 Proposals For New Dispensaries

CONNECTICUT: Off of news that the state would be adding as many as three new medical cannabis dispensaries, 19 different groups have submitted proposals to be part of the potential expansion.

No details on who the applicants are or where the proposed dispensaries would be located have been released.

Many speculate they will be located in the more populated New Haven and Fairfield counties. Combined, the two counties account for over 50% of the state’s patient medical cannabis registrations, but only 2 of the 6 currently operating dispensaries are located there.

“We think we had a great response,” Jonathan Harris, the department’s commissioner, said. “We have a healthy pool from which to do our analysis and make an appropriate selection of up to three.”

Feds Should Legalize Hemp Farming, Too

CONNECTICUT:  Federal authorities are way behind the bush on dealing with hemp, but an increasing number of states, now including Connecticut, have it right.

The General Assembly passed a bill this spring that legalizes industrial hemp. Hemp can now be grown, used and sold here. This is good news, because hemp is a remarkably versatile agricultural product, but it comes with a major caveat — it is still illegal under federal law. Should an enterprising Connecticut farmer plant a field of industrial hemp, federal agents could swoop in and pull up the (harmless) plants.

This is idiotic. Industrial hemp should be legal, period.

Hemp has been grown for centuries. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew it; it is one of mankind’s oldest cultivated crops. It has thousands of uses, from food, clothing and paper to body oil, horse bedding and biomass energy.

New Connecticut Law In Effect July 1 Legalizes Hemp Farming: 1st Step To Nullify Federal Ban In Practice

CONNECTICUT:  July 1 a new law takes effect removing the ban on industrial hemp farming in Connecticut, setting the stage to nullify in practice the federal prohibition on the same.

Introduced by State Reps. Melissa Ziobron (R-34) and Aundré Bumgardner (R-41), House Bill 5780 (HB5780) opens the door for a full-scale commercial hemp market in the state by treating it as any other crop for farming. It passed the House by a vote of 142-2 on June 2, and passed the Senate by a vote of 36-0 on June 3.  It became law without a signature from Gov. Malloy and goes into effect on Wednesday as Public Act 15-202.

The new law removes any mention of industrial hemp from the part of the criminal code that classifies marijuana as a banned controlled substance. From the official summary of the bill:

This bill legalizes industrial hemp by removing it from the state “marijuana” and “cannabis-type substances” definitions, thereby removing its status as a controlled substance. Thus, the bill allows industrial hemp to be grown, used, and sold under state law [emphasis added]

Medical Marijuana Patient Rolls Grow 13 Percent

CONNECTICUT:  The number of Connecticut residents registered to buy medical marijuana grew 13 percent in the most recent quarter, the state Department of Consumer Protection said Tuesday.

As of June 5, there were 4,097 registered patients, who must have at least one of 17 health conditions to be eligible. That was up from 3,635 on April 15, and 2,326 on Oct. 15, which was shortly after dispensaries began selling product.

New Haven County has 1,113 registered patients, while Fairfield County has 981 and Hartford County has 868.