Kirke LLC/Metro Denver Telluride Health Center LLC Voluntarily Recalls Medical Marijuana Due to Pesticide Residues

COLORADO: A Denver marijuana cultivation business Kirke LLC/Metro Denver Telluride Health Center LLC, doing business as The Hemp Center Colorado Springs and The Hemp Center, is voluntarily recalling all medical marijuana due to the presence of potentially unsafe pesticide residues.

Samples of marijuana tested during a (DEH) investigation contained residual levels of Avermectin, Bifenazate, Imidacloprid and Myclobutanil, pesticides that the Colorado Department of Agriculture has determined cannot be used legally on marijuana in Colorado.
Medical marijuana plant materials subject to this recall were sold at The Hemp Center Colorado Springs located at 2501 West Colorado Avenue, Suite 106 in Colorado Springs, and The Hemp Center located at 2430 West Main Street in Littleton. All medical marijuana bearing labels with OPC codes of 403-00892 or 403-00899 are subject to this recall. Kirke LLC/Metro Denver Telluride Health Center LLC’s grow facility is located in Denver.
 

Product Identity: Source OPC: Purchased From:
All Medical Marijuana 403-00892, 403-00899 The Hemp Center Colorado Springs
2501 W Colorado Ave. Suite 106
Colorado Springs, CO  80904
License # 402-00597
All Medical Marijuana 403-00892, 403-00899 The Hemp Center
2430 W Main St
Littleton, CO  80120
License # 402-00602

Consumers who have these recalled products should dispose of the products or return them to the store from which they were purchased. For more information about the recall, contact The Hemp Center Colorado Springs or The Hemp Center at info@the-hemp-center.com.

There have been no reports of illness. The possible health impact of consuming marijuana products with unapproved pesticide residues is unknown. Short- and long-term health impacts may exist depending on the specific product, duration, frequency, level of exposure and route of exposure. Consumers with concerns about their personal health should contact their physician with related questions.

The Denver Department of Environmental Health (DEH) is investigating this issue and overseeing the recall process to remove potentially contaminated products from commercial circulation. DEH conducts inspections of marijuana-infused product manufacturers and retail locations in Denver and investigates related complaints.  

Consumers with questions or concerns about recalled product or pesticide residues in marijuana products are encouraged to contact the product retailer and/or the DEH Public Health Inspections division at phicomments@denvergov.org or 720-913-1311.

As Denver’s nationally-accredited local public health agency, the Department of Environmental Health (DEH) is dedicated to advancing Denver’s environmental and public health goals. DEH Divisions include Denver Animal Protection, Community Health, Environmental Quality, Office of the Medical Examiner and Public Health Inspections.
 
For more information about Environmental Health visit www.denvergov.org/EnvironmentalHealth
 

Boulder To Take New Look At Marijuana Regulations

COLORADO: Representatives of the marijuana industry, supported by Boulder City Councilman Macon Cowles, want the city to reconsider its approach to marijuana regulation and come in line with the rest of the state, but top city officials say the more stringent approach has resulted in a safer city while still allowing businesses to be competitive.

Cowles said the city’s regulations may have made sense when legal marijuana first exploded in 2009 and the industry included shady actors with criminal records, but the remaining 77 licensed businesses have shown themselves able and willing to follow exacting rules and shouldn’t have to live with a “zero tolerance” policy for any rule violation and city staff who have the discretion to revoke a license without an administrative review.

“Most people in the industry feel like it isn’t working that well,” Cowles said. “They feel like they’re hanging from a thread that could be cut at any time. Our ordinance says that having a marijuana business is not a property right. It’s a privilege. We say there’s zero tolerance and no administrative review. That makes someone feel pretty insecure, and that’s not fair.”

Pot Products Recalled, Pot Shop Fires Employee For Unapproved Pesticides

COLORADO: Jeremy Kilbourne dropped off a box of jars filled with marijuana. The marijuana could sell for thousands of dollars, but not now.

The inventory from Kilbourne’s marijuana shop on Evans Avenue, Sacred Seed, is being tested to make sure it does not have unapproved pesticides in it. A company called Mahatma tested another batch last Monday and discovered it had unapproved pesticides.

(credit: CBS)

 

Language Of Politics Irks And Inspires Pot-Smoking Mom

COLORADO: Since the publication of my article “Lessons learned from Child Protective Services” I have been silently schooled by the Internet. Browsing early comments of the piece revealed that while I had captured the sentiments of CPS fairly well, I’d apparently really missed the mark on parents’ rights. You do not have to let someone in your home without a warrant, and if someone does want inside — they’d better have one in hand. Heard.

I received more education recently when I was contacted by Laura Pegram of the Drug Policy Alliance about SB14-177 and SB14-178, two Colorado Senate bills introduced during the 2014 legislative session. “As far as we know, the legislation plans to make changes to both the civil and criminal code which might recriminalize some aspects of A64 in regard to parenting,” Pegram wrote.

“I wanted to make sure you were aware of it as it seems especially relevant to your column.” She included the early proposals of the bills and wished me well.

Recreational Marijuana Stores Slow To Open, Driving Up Prices

COLORADO:  Six weeks after recreational marijuana sales started in Colorado, most would-be retailers still haven’t been licensed to sell it. As a result, the price of recreational pot has skyrocketed as shops jump through bureaucratic hoops to open their doors.

On a recent afternoon, outside LoDo Wellness Center in Denver, most customers leave the shop with smiles on their faces and a small bag of marijuana in their hands.

But customers like Justin Riddle have a different perspective.

“I didn’t buy anything, because it’s too expensive,” Riddle says. “That’s ridiculous, I can just go to my dealer right down the road and (expletive) get it, $10 a gram.”

 

Recreational Marijuana Stores Slow To Open, Driving Up Prices

COLORADO:  Six weeks after recreational marijuana sales started in Colorado, most would-be retailers still haven’t been licensed to sell it. As a result, the price of recreational pot has skyrocketed as shops jump through bureaucratic hoops to open their doors.

On a recent afternoon, outside LoDo Wellness Center in Denver, most customers leave the shop with smiles on their faces and a small bag of marijuana in their hands.

But customers like Justin Riddle have a different perspective.

“I didn’t buy anything, because it’s too expensive,” Riddle says. “That’s ridiculous, I can just go to my dealer right down the road and (expletive) get it, $10 a gram.”

 

Marijuana-Laced Treats Leave Colorado Jonesing For Food-Safety Rules

COLORADO: Where there’s pot, there’s pot brownies. But how do you make sure those high-inducing sweets are safe to eat?

Colorado regulators are wrestling with that question now that the state has legalized recreational marijuana. From sodas and truffles to granola bars and butter, food products infused with THC – the chemical in marijuana that gives you a high — are already for sale.

The problem? Marijuana is still illegal under federal law. And that means the existing food safety system, which relies heavily on support from federal agencies, can’t ensure that marijuana-infused foods are safe.

Purveyors of pot-laced foods say they want the regulation.

“We are under a microscope,” says Christie Lunsford, marketing and education director for Dixie Elixirs, a manufacturer of foods infused with THC. ” [Read more…]

Denver International Airport Formalizes Policy Banning Marijuana And Sets Fines for possession

COLORADO:  Denver International Airport held a public hearing Wednesday to formalize its policy banning marijuana and set fines for possession.

Warning signs were installed at airport entrances earlier this month, notifying passengers that marijuana was banned across the entire airport property, despite the new state law legalizing recreational use and possession by adults age 21 and older. [Read more…]

Denver International Airport First Denver Facility To Ban Marijuana Possession

COLORADO:  Denver International Airport will be the first city facility to prohibit marijuana possession on all of its property as it attempts to combat illegal interstate trafficking in the face of federal law.

Airport officials plan to begin enforcing the new policy, which is the furthest-reaching among the city’s marijuana limitations, in early January.

Recently adopted city ordinances ban the display and transfer — but not mere possession — of marijuana on city-owned property including parks, the 16th Street Mall, streets and sidewalks near schools.

“We talked to all of (the federal agencies involved), and they’ve expressed concern for good reason, but it was our decision based on the way the airport operates,” said Stacey Stegman, DIA spokeswoman. “We didn’t want to impact other airports and other agencies, and we didn’t want to facilitate transporting marijuana across state lines.”

Stegman said DIA chose to bar all possession and display of pot to eliminate confusion and make the same rules apply to all. She said the presence of federal agencies at DIA also was a factor; marijuana remains illegal under federal law.

 

Denver City Council Makes Move To Decriminalize Marijuana

COLORADO:  The Denver City Council has made a move to try and make sure kids who are caught with pot aren’t punished too harshly.

A law voters passed last year decriminalized marijuana possession for adults but it didn’t consider the legal repercussions for a minor.

People under 21 with pot were left open to criminal charges that would stay on their permanent record.

Denver city councilors want it to become a civil charge still enforced by a petty fine but with no lasting legal consequences.