Metro’s Top Cop Says He Wants To Keep Medical Pot Businesses Safe

NEVADA:  In a state where selling pot could once net you life in prison, Clark County‘s top law enforcement officer told a room full of marijuana business owners Thursday that he wants to work with them.

Sheriff Joe Lombardo, who heads the 3,200-officer Metropolitan Police Department, made light of the historic nature of his appearance at a lunch meeting of the Las Vegas Medical Marijuana Association.

“Bear with me. I’m still trying to wrap my arms around the fact that the sheriff’s in a marijuana (meeting),” he said to laughter.

Speaking just days after the county’s first legal marijuana dispensary opened, Lombardo told the owners he wants to help make sure their businesses are safe.

First Marijuana Dispensary In Las Vegas Area Opens

NEVADA:  It was a moment more than two years in the making — or 17 years, depending on how you look at it.

The first legal medical marijuana dispensary in Clark County opened Monday morning and made its first sales to invited customers.

Euphoria Wellness, a shop in the southwest Las Vegas Valley, is one of 40 dispensaries approved for Clark County last year by state health officials.

 

Washington Marijuana Market Mellows

WASHINGTON: Ramsey Hamide looked across the packed shelves and piled boxes of product in the cramped backroom of Main Street Marijuana and stretched out his arms.

“Look at this,” the store manager said, smiling victoriously. “Nonstop, growers are coming, bringing us samples, new products.”

It’s a vastly different world from six months ago, when Main Street, Clark County’s first recreational marijuana store, opened its doors on July 9 to widespread shortages.

For the first few months, Hamide spent days on the road, courting growers across the state and trying to build relationships that would secure at least a modest amount of stock for his mostly barren shelves.

But by November and December, the situation had changed significantly, with growers coming to Vancouver to court him, hawking a wide variety of strains, edibles, lozenges and even some oils and concentrates.

Shortly before he spoke to The Columbian on a December afternoon, a new grower dropped by unannounced with a bag of samples for store employees to try, hoping to make a sale. The asking price per gram was too high, so employees sent him away — something unheard of just six months ago.

Washington’s Marijuana Market Mellows

WASHINGTON:  Ramsey Hamide looked across the packed shelves and piled boxes of product in the cramped backroom of Main Street Marijuana and stretched out his arms.

“Look at this,” the store manager said, smiling victoriously. “Nonstop, growers are coming, bringing us samples, new products.”

It’s a vastly different world from six months ago, when Main Street, Clark County‘s first recreational marijuana store, opened its doors on July 9 to widespread shortages.

For the first few months, Hamide spent days on the road, courting growers across the state and trying to build relationships that would secure at least a modest amount of stock for his mostly barren shelves.

But by November and December, the situation had changed significantly, with growers coming to Vancouver to court him, hawking a wide variety of strains, edibles, lozenges and even some oils and concentrates.

Marijuana, Assisted Suicide Spark Lively Debate

NEVADA:  Nearly 1,000 Clark County high school juniors and seniors recently attended the 58th annual Las Vegas Sun Youth Forum at the Las Vegas Convention Center. They gathered in groups and discussed a host of issues affecting the community, Nevada, the nation and the world. Each group selected a representative to write about the experience. Here is one of them.

One of the topics that generated a high level of engagement and controversy at the 2014 Sun Youth Forum was the legalization of marijuana. Initially, students were reluctant about the drug’s legalization, claiming it could cause an increase in driving under the influence and overall drug consumption.

But as the discussion progressed, we concluded that legalization is unlikely to increase drug users.

 

Judge Upholds Ban On Marijuana Businesses In Clark County

WAHSINGTON:  A Cowlitz County judge upheld Clark County’s ban on marijuana businesses Wednesday, making it the fourth court in Washington to uphold local government bans on those types of businesses.

In the court case, Emerald Enterprises and John M. Larson v. Clark County, the judge agreed with an Attorney General’s Office opinion earlier this year that concluded there is nothing in Initiative 502, which legalized recreational marijuana in the state, that overrides local government authority to ban such businesses.

The county ban covers unincorporated parts of Clark County but not cities in the region, which each have authority over their own territory. Vancouver, Battle Ground and parts of Woodland, for instance, allow some marijuana businesses. Other towns, such as Camas and Washougal, have their own bans.

Larson owns Stucky’s, 7831 N.E. Highway 99, a state-permitted marijuana shop in Hazel Dell that can’t sell pot because of the ban. Larson declined to comment on this story.

 

Landlord Workshop Tackles Marijuana Issues

NEVADA:  Marijuana legalization has left Clark County landlords with many questions regarding their rights as property owners.

Can they ban recreational marijuana use in their units? Do smoke-free policies cover marijuana use? And what about marijuana used for medicinal purposes?

Clark County Public Health has been helping landlords get answers to those questions — and questions on a variety of other topics — with free landlord training sessions funded by the county’s Community Transformation Grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But with the grant set to expire at the end of the month, the wildly popular workshops aren’t likely to continue. Public Health hosted its third training session Wednesday at the Vancouver Community Library. About 80 landlords attended the session, and more were turned away.

The training has an emphasis on smoke-free housing since it’s hosted by the department but covers a wide range of other topics. Each training session costs about $2,500.

 

 

More Than 500 Apply For A Slice Of Nevada’s Medical Marijuana Pie

NEVADA:  The state has received more than 500 applications for running medical marijuana establishments in Nevada. Reno Public Radio’s Michelle Bliss reports that after scoring and ranking those applicants, public health officials will announce their choices in November. They expect the first medical marijuana purchases to be made by early next year.

Under new state law approved during the last legislative session, Nevada can house up to 66 medical marijuana establishments, which include dispensaries, cultivation facilities, testing labs, and companies that produce edible marijuana or marijuana-infused products.

Most will set up shop in Clark County, but up to ten can be housed in Washoe.

Chad Westom is the bureau chief of medical marijuana for the state’s division of public and behavioral health. He says applicants had to pay $5,000 just to be considered and that his staff’s decisions will be based on several different factors.

 

County Approves 101 Applications For Medical Marijuana Developers

NEVADA:  Clark County commissioners on Tuesday approved 101 applications from medical marijuana developers seeking to open production, cultivation and laboratory facilities from Laughlin to Las Vegas.

With unanimous votes, commissioners approved the vast majority, rejecting only five applications from a pool of 106. Commissioners started the day with 112 applications. The remaining six withdrew.

The marathon, seven-hour hearing capped the county’s foray into approving medical marijuana applications for special use permits. They approved 58 permits for cultivation facilities, 38 permits for production facilities and five permits for laboratories for testing the medical marijuana.

The applicants will still need approval from the state. Commissioners earlier this month approved 18 applications for dispensaries in unincorporated Clark County.

 

Clark County NV Picks 18 Applicants For Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

NEVADA: They came from near and far. Las Vegas Valley developers, medical marijuana industry veterans from Colorado and area doctors were among them.

The odds were against them. Seventy-nine applicants — down from 81 — aiming for part of the region’s next industry: medical marijuana. And Clark County had just 18 slots for medical marijuana dispensaries.

There were familiar names among the winners that county commissioners picked Friday at the end of a three-day hearing. Longtime developer and gaming executive Randy Black, who retired last year as chief operating officer at Mesquite Gaming, for example, hopes to open a dispensary in Laughlin. He was the only applicant there.