Marijuana And The Growth In Cigarette Alternatives

CALIFORNIA: Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of avoidable death in the US, and chronic exposure to tobacco smoke is related to increased incidences of cancer as well as vascular disease, according to the United States Center for Disease Control. Many substitutes have been created to help individuals quit smoking cigarettes, such as herbal cigarettes, e-cigs, vaping, specialized gum, and many other ways.

Studies found in The Washington Post, pulmonologist Dr. Donald Tashkin, Professor Emeritus at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has assumed that there would be a positive association between marijuana use and lung cancer, and that the association would be more positive with heavier use. What they found instead was no connection at all, and even a suggestion of some protective effect.

CV Sciences is currently in development of Cannabidiol-based potential U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved drugs. The company’s pipeline is the CVSI-007, a chewing gum that contains nicotine and synthetic Cannabidiol to support cessation of smokeless tobacco use and addiction. CV Sciences currently has two distinct operations: the Pharmaceuticals and Consumer Products Divisions. These divisions are supported by its medical and scientific advisory board, and advanced art production facilities.

Daily Marijuana Use By College Students Surpasses Cigarettes For The First Time

OHIO: More college students are using marijuana daily than smoking cigarettes, according to a national survey released Tuesday.

One in 17 students report using marijuana 20 or more times in the past 30 days in 2014, according to the annual survey of students by University of Michigan researchers.

The 5.9 percent rate is the highest since 1980, when the national survey about drug, alcohol and cigarette use was first conducted.

In 2007 the daily or near-daily rate of use was 3.5 percent.

“It’s clear that for the past seven or eight years there has been an increase in marijuana use among the nation’s college students,” Lloyd Johnston, the principal investigator of the study, said in a statement. “And this largely parallels an increase we have been seeing among high school seniors.”