WSLCB Approves Jan. 1, 2020 Date For All Marijuana Products, Packaging & Labeling

WASHINGTON: On December 12, 2018, the Board adopted interim packaging and labeling policies. These policies will remain in effect until adoption of rules to implement them. It is anticipated that once adopted, all changes will be enforced January 1, 2020, giving licensees approximately one year to prepare for the new rules by selling out existing product and updating their packaging and labeling to meet new requirements.

Approved Colors, Shapes and Other Allowances

Clarifying “False and Misleading” Language

Other Resources

Kush Bottles To Open New Facility In Las Vegas

CALIFORNIA:  Kush Bottles, a leading provider of packaging, suppliesvaporizershydrocarbon gasessolventsaccessories and branding solutions for the regulated cannabis industry, today announced it has signed a lease for a new warehouse facility in Las Vegas to meet demand from the consumer market as well as support the current and new businesses entering the industry or expanding operations.

kush bottles

With the 13,000 square foot facility, expected to be operational mid-June, Kush Bottles expects to minimize the time taken to receive and distribute packaging and supplies, streamline its logistics and access more storage space for high-demand products with rapid turnover times, such as exit bags, cartridges, and pre-roll tubes. By opening its first local distribution facility in Las Vegas, the Company aims to become a stronger partner to some of the most advanced cannabis cultivation and retail facilities in the industry, which are located in Nevada. This warehouse will complement the existing Kush Bottles hazmat facility used today to service the Las Vegas and greater Nevada market with a variety of hydrocarbons, which businesses use to turn cannabis plants into oils.

“The new Las Vegas facility will further solidify Kush Bottles’ commitment to the city’s thriving, local cannabis community and strengthen our own mission to be the go-to partner for cannabis companies as they scale their operations,” said Kush Bottles CEO Nick Kovacevich. “The fluctuating demand from the tourism and organic growth in the cannabis market means that a lot of our partners are having a difficult time forecasting their packaging and supply needs. By having a local facility, we give our clients the added flexibility of faster delivery as well as offering on-site pick up if that’s what their business dictates.”

Top 3 Drivers Of North American Cannabis Packaging Market

UNITED KINGDOM: Technavio market research analysts forecast the cannabis packaging market in North America to grow at a CAGR of more than 10% during the forecast period, according to their latest report.

The market study covers the present scenario and growth prospects of the cannabis packaging market in North America for 2017-2021. The report also lists rigid packaging and flexible packaging as the two major segments based on packaging type. The rigid packaging segment dominated the market with close to 62% of the market share in 2016.

 

“Not For Kids” Warning Label: What It Means For Your Cannabis Business

By Jason Lammers

Effective Feb 14th, 2017 the new Not for Kids warning symbol will be required on all cannabis edibles. Here’s what it means for your cannabis business.

  • The LCB is defining marijuana edibles as “marijuana infused products meant to be eaten or swallowed”
  • Warning symbol must be a minimum size of ¾” tall x ½” wide
  • Warning symbol can not be changed in any way except for sizing purposes (as long as the minimum sizes mentioned above are met)
  • Warning symbol can be incorporated into your branded packaging or be applied as a label onto your existing packaging.
  • Warning symbol must be on the front of your cannabis packaging.
  • Warning symbol cannot cover or obscure any other information required to be on the package.
  • Warning symbol must have a black border around the edges when the label or packaging is also white to ensure good visibility

The new warning symbol requirements came about, due to concerns from the Washington Poison Center, because of an increase in calls from kids eating marijuana edibles. The 800 number on the new warning symbol is an emergency helpline, that is a free and confidential resource.

The warning symbol requirement is a great example of how both the public and private sectors worked together to craft sensible legislation to address this issue. Once it was determined that a warning symbol was needed to keep kids away from Marijuana edibles, original drafts were going to require a Mr Yuk sticker be applied to all Cannabis edibles. Clearly, anyone in the edibles industry didn’t want a Mr Yuk sticker on their edibles packaging as that would only create more confusion to the consumer. Thanks to a variety of cannabis industry leaders & organizations providing feedback to the Liquor and Cannabis Board, they listened, and developed a new more sensible warning symbol that would both be an effective warning symbol and not confuse cannabis consumers.

If you work in the cannabis industry this should be an important lesson to us all to get involved and help steer sensible cannabis legislation in the right direction. This is our industry, and the LCB does listen, so it’s on us to make sure our voice is heard. There are a bunch of great cannabis groups you can join to make sure you’re involved. Here’s a few of my favorites.

Cannabis Alliance – http://www.thecannabisalliance.us/

NORML – http://norml.org/wa/item/washington-norml

NCIA – http://thecannabisindustry.org/join-now/

MJBA – http://mjba.net/

 

For more questions on the Not for Kids Warning Symbol and/or general packaging questions you can hear me talk at Canncon on the packaging panel on Feb 18th and come see me at our booth at Cannacon Feb 16-18th, booth #141.

To Purchase Not For Kids Warning Labels you can contact me via email or go to www.420Wholesalepack.com/cannabis-labels

“Not for Kids” Deadline Approaches For Washington Edibles

WASHINGTON: The “Not for Kids” warning symbol will be required to be placed on all packages of marijuana products meant to be eaten or swallowed effective February 14, 2017. The Board recognizes that changing packaging requires time which is why the effective date was extended to 90 days after adoption in mid-February; enforcement of the new requirement will commence at the same time. For your convenience the basic requirements are listed below as well as links to the rules and additional information.

Note: We have received questions about what constitutes a “principal display panel.” The term was included for those packages that do not have a “front” to the packaging, such as a round container or other similar packaging. The principal display panel is what is presented to the consumer under conditions of retail sale. For example, what the consumer will view when the product is displayed on a shelf or case. The principal display panel is not on the back of the package.

1.   The warning symbol cannot be any smaller than three-fourths inch in height by one-half inch in width. It must be of a size so as to be legible, readily visible by the consumer, and effective to alert consumers and children that the product is not for kids.

2.   The warning symbol must be placed on the “principal display panel” or front of the package.

a.    “Principal display panel” is defined as  the portion(s) of the surface of the immediate container, or of any outer container or wrapping, which bear(s) the labeling designed to be most prominently displayed, shown, presented, or examined under conditions of retail sale.

b.    “Immediate container” means the external container holding the marijuana product.

3.    The symbol can be placed on the package/label in threeways:

a.    The digital image can be incorporated onto labels for marijuana edible products;

b.    The digital image may be downloaded and used to print stickers for placement on the front of marijuana edible products; or

c.    Licensees may choose to purchase stickers of the “Not for Kids” warning symbol for placement on the front of marijuana edible products.

4.   The symbol or stickers cannot cover or obscure any other information required to be on packages or labels for marijuana products.

5.   The symbol is trademarked and cannot be changed in any way other than for sizing purposes, except that a licensee must use a black border around the edges of the white background of the warning symbol image when the label or packaging is also white to ensure visibility of the warning symbol.

A digital image of the warning symbol can be found at the Washington Poison Center’s website and additional information is available on the WSLCB website. You can view the rules as adopted by the Board on the WSLCB’s Recently Adopted Rules webpage

The new section appears in the Legislature’s website under WAC 314-55-106. The Legislature’s website contains the most current information and versions of all laws and rules in the state.

A New Twist On Rolling Your Own: Curved Papers

The Rolling Papers Industry and Curved Papers Manufacturing

by Michael O’Malley

Our package design was born of necessity, like many inventions. I had to make Curved Papers myself; they are a true innovation, and no one was set up to make them when we started. It is a non-trivial issue to introduce fundamental innovation in a big established industry. In the way I came up with to make them, the packaging is integral. For decades now, most papers come interleaved. But some are still sold flat. We have been able to use the flat papers to prepare the Curved Papers booklets. I developed a post-process to cut rectangular booklets of flat papers that were complete except for the easy to roll curved edge. The package and the papers are the same shape, and we cut the papers right in the package.

curvedpapers3

Package and Label, and Contents If we could deliver the product without a package, that would be preferable in some ways. This is one of our guiding principles. If you take all 50 leaves out of a fresh pack of Curved Papers package, in your other hand is the packaging. It’s trash. It should be minimal and recyclable. Reduce, re-use, recycle! I’ve seen so much bad packaging from this standpoint already in the tobacco and cannabis aspects of the rolling papers industry. On the tobacco side, they strain for innovation, and have come out with a lot of really horribly un-ecological stuff, like heavy disposable packaging that has metal or plastic hinges and a magnet clasp.

We have tried to stay away from any plastic or metal and we’re trying to source more and more eco-friendly adhesives for the one spot where we stick the sleeve together. We may be able to solve that with an interlocking tab approach. We keep working at it. Packaging should normally be informative about its contents. Curved Papers package reveals the Easy To Roll Curved Edge.

Ecology Recycling is a huge frontier for humanity. I believe all packaging should be designed for its entire life cycle. There are many great ideas percolating in this regard. I have seen plastic six-pack holders that were made of edible hemp plastic, so that instead of strangling sea turtles, it feeds them. Our packaging is paper, and could be made of hemp. In any case, it’s readily recyclable. And we print “don’t litter” and “recycle” on it. We are going to keep on getting better at it. Plastic bottled water is the single biggest disaster in packaging history. curvedtee Branding A critical aspect of the packaging is what we draw and write on it. On the branding front we have developed the name and logo and colors (navy and purple), and the purple smoke motif, homage to Jimi Hendrix. Curved is a big word. Not only the package shows the shape of the papers, the logo shows the curved edge. It’s all pretty smiley. We’ve now done Curved Canada and Curved Mexico in response to political events. We have the ability to white label topically, to be journalistic; and for commercial purposes, too, to print branded Curved Papers as promotional items, or to private label for licensees. The package has become a platform. As one of the oldest industries, rolling papers has a rich history of evolving packaging design. My friend, Paul Rolhom, has a collection of 13,500 booklets from as far back as the early 1700’s.

They are amazing. So we wanted to have a beautiful enough package to be compared in such a grand tradition. We have been included in Paul’s amazing collection. Actually, we’re in kind of a golden age on the cannabis side, and this rolling paper package tradition goes forward. Everybody and their kin can now each easily have their own branded papers, and this has been a lot of fun the past couple of years. You can even print on the rolling papers now. Who would want to do that? People smoke weird things, but ink? Makes no sense. There are so many bad ideas out there.

Regulatory Compliance There are all kinds of local and regional and international standards and they are constantly changing. Everywhere you go, there are different regulations, and you have to have a certain level of business in the area to justify the separate print jobs required for specific compliant text and markings.

curvedhemptube

Other Good Ideas on Packaging from Curved Papers

  • HEMP Tube 

I have to talk about a pet peeve and mystery that is bothering me. When I first visited Denver, for the first MJBA Denver Meetup, I went to a dispensary and tried to buy a joint. The whole experience was interesting, after buying weed on the streets of New York and Boston my whole life. The packaging aspect of it was perplexing. First of all, you couldn’t get a joint, you had to buy a cone. It’s funny how people have strong preferences about these things. After all, it’s a habit. Habits are easy to develop, and hard to change. But I hate cones. Cones are for people who can’t roll joints. They make no sense otherwise. The most horrifying thing was that the wretched cone came in a big PLASTIC tube, bigger than it really had to be, too, since it should have been for a joint, not a cone. It was huge. Curved Papers has developed a new product, a sleek tube that holds one joint, and is made of biodegradable HEMP. I would like to know the politics and economics of how the people who got the contracts to produce pre-packaged doobies got them, and how they came to introduce cones as the standard, and plastic tubes. I think the FDA may have been involved and required the plastic tubes? Any investigative journalists from Colorado want to help me out? curvedblunts

  • Curved Blunts

We also see the beauty of having the cigarette wrap be made of the same material as the smoking material, like hemp or tobacco. Of course it’s quite popular to mix them. Hence our other new product: CURVED BLUNTS.

  • Hemp Wear

We have begun a new t-shirt joint venture to provide a platform for a t-shirt museum and on-demand one-off t-shirt printing, with crowd-pricing for popular styles. Pushing the brand out through appropriate product and merchandise channels is another revenue opportunity.

 


A Hierarchy of Packaging Values Integrated Product Enhancement: Packaging exists first and foremost to optimize the delivery of the product. Sustainability: Too much packaging is generally bad. More contents, less packaging. Green packaging.

Brand Manifestation: Packaging is often the most important, and is clearly a literal, branding touch point. Compliance: There are regulatory packaging and labeling requirements which must be fulfilled by packaging.


Pot Startup Rolls Out Accessories

CALIFORNIA: Time for the marijuana industry to get a makeover, says Josh Gordon, founder and CEO of e-commerce start-up The Bureau.

He’s weeding out tie-dye and leaf graphics for chic new designs. The 27-year-old said he has high hopes to “raise the standards for the [marijuana] industry,” and nix the black-market feel.

“Whether we’re talking about a grandmother dealing with [the] side effects of chemotherapy, or a modern professional that consumes recreationally, they deserve to be treated like the high-value consumer they are,” said Gordon.

Watch this entrepreneur pitch his pot packaging to a panel with Troy Dayton, CEO of ArcView Group, a firm that connects investors to pot start-ups, David Dinenberg, founder and CEO of KindBanking, and Wendy Robbins, producer and director of “The Marijuana Show.” Will the panel be in or nip his start-up in the bud?

Lighting up

Growing up, Gordon spent winters at his family home in Colorado, where the cannabis industry has gone more mainstream.