Arizona: Supreme Court Affirms That Lawmakers Cannot Ban Medical Cannabis Access on College Campuses

ARIZONA:  The Arizona Supreme Court has upheld an appellate court decision striking down a 2012 law that sought to forbid medical cannabis access on college campuses.

Lifetime NORML Legal Committee member Tom Dean represented the patient-defendant in the case pro bono, and called the decision a “victory for democracy.”

Justices opined that the 2012 law was unconstitutional because it impermissibly sought to amend the Arizona Medical Marijuana Act, which voters passed in 2010. State law limits the legislature’s ability to amend, repeal, or supersede voter-initiated laws.

“Because the AMMA sets forth a list of locations where the legislature may impose ‘civil, criminal or other penalties’ when a person possesses or uses marijuana, § 36-2802, and because that list does not include college and university campuses (unlike pre-, primary-, and secondary-school grounds), we assume that the voters did not intend to criminalize AMMA-compliant possession or use of marijuana on public college and university campuses,” the court ruled. It further rejected the state’s claim that a campus-wide ban was necessary in order to preserve universities’ federal funding.

“If the State had prevailed, they could then have tampered with any and all ballot initiatives, past, present, and future,” said Dean. “This is a victory for all Arizona voters and especially for medical marijuana patients.”

The ruling sets aside the felony conviction of defendant Andrew Lee Maestas, who was initially charged and found guilty of the possession of 0.4 grams of marijuana despite his status as a state-registered medical cannabis patient.


For more information, contact Keith Stroup, NORML Legal Counsel, at (202) 483-5500. The case is Arizona v Maestas, No. CR-17-0193-PR.

Daily Marijuana Use By College Students Surpasses Cigarettes For The First Time

OHIO: More college students are using marijuana daily than smoking cigarettes, according to a national survey released Tuesday.

One in 17 students report using marijuana 20 or more times in the past 30 days in 2014, according to the annual survey of students by University of Michigan researchers.

The 5.9 percent rate is the highest since 1980, when the national survey about drug, alcohol and cigarette use was first conducted.

In 2007 the daily or near-daily rate of use was 3.5 percent.

“It’s clear that for the past seven or eight years there has been an increase in marijuana use among the nation’s college students,” Lloyd Johnston, the principal investigator of the study, said in a statement. “And this largely parallels an increase we have been seeing among high school seniors.”

 

Colorado Lawmakers Approve Medical Marijuana For Students In School

COLORADO: Reading, writing … and reefer?

A first-in-the-nation bill that would allow students to have medical marijuana in school is heading to the Colorado governor’s desk after passing the state legislature late Monday night.

The change in the law was sought to let schoolchildren in Colorado who are living with conditions like epilepsy, cerebral palsy and seizures take doses of low-THC medical marijuana. While marijuana possession and use is legal in Colorado, schools are still drug-free zones — but bill supporters argued medical marijuana should be treated no differently than other medications.

“We allow children to take all sorts of psychotropic medications, whether it’s Ritalin or opiate painkillers, under supervised circumstances. We should do the same here,” Rep. Jonathan Singer said.

Pot connection? Colorado Schools Deny Spike In Applications Sparked By Marijuana Law

COLORADO: Colorado colleges and universities have seen a dramatic jump in applications, including from out of state, following the legalization of marijuana, but officials insist there’s no drug connection.

Applications to the University of Colorado are up 30 percent since Amendment 64 made recreational pot legal, according to Director of Admissions Kevin MacLennan. But while several marijuana advocates told FoxNews.com it is hardly surprising that the Centennial State would become a mecca for college-bound tokers, MacLennan disagrees.

“We aren’t getting a lot of questions about this,” MacLennan said, referring to the new law.